artnet: See images from a fantastically kaleidoscopic exhibition in Geneva that does away with old categories of art history

How to bring the story to life? The Geneva Museum of Art and History decided the best way was to bring in a stranger, inviting renowned art historian Jean-Hubert Martin to take a fresh look at its collection.

Martin turned his expert eye to millennia of artworks and objects to assemble the exhibition”Draw your own conclusion“, an exuberant excursion through 500 works of all genres (including a handful of loans from several Geneva institutions) which brings together treasures constituting the fascinating diversity of the museum’s collection.

In total, the exhibition is divided into 20 sections, each based on different themes, from the cross to the globe, and from the breast to motherhood. Overall, the exhibition aims to abolish artistic hierarchies while reaffirming the primary relationship between the work and the viewer, freed from history.

“This exhibition was born from the observation of curator Jean-Hubert Martin that the knowledge accumulated over more than a century and a half, while advancing the history of art, ended up masking and obliterating the essential vitality of museums: the emotion that the pieces and objects are capable of giving rise to,” the museum said in a statement.More specifically, the curator wishes to reconnect with analogical thought, which dominated during the Renaissance before being eclipsed by Cartesian thought.

The exhibition is the second in the museum’s “XL” series, curated by the institution’s director, Marc-Olivier Wahler, in which outside experts are invited to curate exhibitions.

See images from the exhibit below.

Installation view “Draw what you see” at the Museum of Art and History, Geneva, 2022. Courtesy of the Museum of Art and History, Geneva.

Installation view “Draw what you see” at the Museum of Art and History, Geneva, 2022. Courtesy of the Museum of Art and History, Geneva.

Installation view “Draw what you see” at the Museum of Art and History, Geneva, 2022. Courtesy of the Museum of Art and History, Geneva.

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