Historic House – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ Fri, 13 May 2022 12:23:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://deepwood.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2-150x150.png Historic House – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ 32 32 Council assesses historic value of Lenroot House – Superior Telegram https://deepwood.net/council-assesses-historic-value-of-lenroot-house-superior-telegram/ Fri, 13 May 2022 12:04:17 +0000 https://deepwood.net/council-assesses-historic-value-of-lenroot-house-superior-telegram/ SUPERIOR — The home built by Superior’s only man who could have been President of the United States may soon be recognized on the Municipal Register of Historic Places as the Lenroot House. It’s a story that was unknown to Brent and Ashley Fennessey when they purchased their home at 810 E. Third St. in […]]]>

SUPERIOR — The home built by Superior’s only man who could have been President of the United States may soon be recognized on the Municipal Register of Historic Places as the Lenroot House.

It’s a story that was unknown to Brent and Ashley Fennessey when they purchased their home at 810 E. Third St. in 2013.

It was the character of the house that attracted them.

“He just has a ton of character inside,” councilman Brent Fennessey said. “He’s got a ton of character on the outside – a character you don’t see very often anymore.”

As the house fell into disrepair, they could imagine the house’s potential.

The house was built with a round tower and a polygonal dormer that merges with the main gable of the house. With wide cantilevered eaves, the house was clad in a variety of shingles, which evolved from the Queen Anne style. The rare style is best represented by the Lenroot House at 810 E. Third St., according to the 2019 Intensive Architecture and History Survey Report by the Wisconsin Historical Society.

After the couple bought the house, Fennessey said local librarian, author and historian Teddie Meronek contacted him after writing an article about the Lenroots that she thought he would find interesting.

He launched Fennessey on a project to find out more about the house’s history.

“It was a fun process because it’s like we find this little nugget of information and there’s nothing there for a few years and then we find another little piece,” Fennessey said. “Surprisingly, there wasn’t much that we were able to gather. We still haven’t been able to find an original image of it.

Built in the kitten corner of Fairlawn Mansion, he said they even searched for photographs of the museum that housed Martin and Grace Pattison, but had no luck finding a glimpse of their back home -plan.

“We found a photo of the (Lenroot) family standing next to the house, but it’s a close-up photo and there’s not a lot of architecture that’s shown in that photo,” Fennessey said. .

Irvine Lenroot, who built the house in the early 1890s, lived there with his wife, Clara (Clough) Lenroot and two daughters. He got his start in Wisconsin politics as an ally of Governor Robert La Follette while serving in the state assembly from 1901 to 1907.

In 1909, Lenroot took office in Washington, D.C., serving in the United States House of Representatives as a Republican from Wisconsin’s 11th congressional district. He served four successive terms until resigning in 1918 after being elected to the United States Senate to fill a position left vacant by the death of United States Senator Paul Husting, who was killed in a hunting accident.

“He was the only U.S. senator to come out of Superior,” Fennessey said.

But it was the 1920 Republican National Convention in Chicago that created one of the most interesting events in American political history, according to a 1977 article in “The Wisconsin Magazine of History.” After U.S. Senator Warren G. Harding of Ohio was nominated for president, delegates ignored advice from party leaders who believed the more progressive Lenroot would balance the ticket with the more conservative Harding. Instead, delegates elected Massachusetts Governor Calvin Coolidge as Harding’s running mate by a 4-1 margin.

Coolidge became the country’s 30th president when Harding died in 1923.

Besides Lenroot, the house has long been owned by community leaders, Fennessey said. In 1913, the house was sold to Edward McMahon, owner of McMahon Co., followed by a sale in 1938 to an Evening Telegram managing director, Sidney Buchanan, Fennessey said.

In 1950 it was sold to Emerick Pohling, a district engineer for Ramapo Ajax, who made brake shoes, he said. After sitting vacant for two years in the early 1950s, the house was sold to Richard Sell, a salesman for Howard & Sell, an Oldsmobile dealership, before being sold to Robert Cole, also a salesman at Howard & Sell, who owned it for over 50 years before the Fennessey family bought the house.

Fennessey said he decided to seek a spot on the Municipal Register of Historic Places to recognize and display his home’s history. He also hopes for statewide recognition in the future.

According to a survey of historic properties in Superior conducted by the Wisconsin Historical Society in 2019, the house may be eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Upper City Council will consider listing the property on the City Register following a public hearing at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, May 17, in Room 201 of the Government Center.

“Superior has a super rich history,” Fennessey said. “I think it’s important that we highlight that whenever we can.”

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Kansas City Council Members Take ‘Extraordinary Step’ to Save Midtown’s Historic Buildings | KCUR 89.3 https://deepwood.net/kansas-city-council-members-take-extraordinary-step-to-save-midtowns-historic-buildings-kcur-89-3/ Mon, 09 May 2022 11:50:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/kansas-city-council-members-take-extraordinary-step-to-save-midtowns-historic-buildings-kcur-89-3/ The group of buildings at the corner of 31st and Main streets in downtown Kansas City are over a century old. Their empty storefronts and brick and limestone exteriors face a busy thoroughfare, and brightly colored murals cover their walls. Earlier this month, a development company said it planned to demolish the buildings, sparking a […]]]>

The group of buildings at the corner of 31st and Main streets in downtown Kansas City are over a century old. Their empty storefronts and brick and limestone exteriors face a busy thoroughfare, and brightly colored murals cover their walls.

Earlier this month, a development company said it planned to demolish the buildings, sparking a backlash among some Kansas City and downtown residents.

“When the news of the demolition came, the neighborhood association really came together and said, ‘What can we do to try to preserve what’s there, or at least as much of what’s there? as possible?'” said Stacy Garrett, president of the Union Hill Neighborhood Association.

Eric Bunch and Katheryn Shields, members of the 4th District Council, whose district includes downtown, moved quickly to stop the proposed demolition. Last week the two applied to put the buildings on the Kansas City Register of Historic Places, creating six months of respite during which nothing can be done to the structures. If buildings obtain historic monument status, they become eligible for historic tax credits.

Normally, these applications for historic designation are filed by building owners. Bunch said the last time similar action was taken was when officials acted to preserve Union Station about three decades ago.

“I realize that’s a pretty extraordinary measure to save this building,” Bunch said. “But we felt it was important enough, historic enough to move forward with a way to save it.”

The landmark application will be reviewed by the Kansas City Historic Preservation Commission and requires City Council approval.

The buildings are owned by Price Management Co., a property manager based in Overland Park. Flat terrain reported last week that Price planned to raze the buildings. Price said he does not plan to redevelop the site until the tram extension is complete.

“There’s no reason to believe the developer is going to preserve the historic feel of this corner, or even factor the gateway to Union Hill into the development plan,” Garrett said.

Price did not respond to requests for comment.

Lively business

In the years between 1880 and 1890, the buildings, located along the old Kansas City streetcar route, were places of commerce and business at a time when Kansas City was experiencing a population boom and rapid economic growth.

The businesses they housed included hardware stores, saddlery, investment company, shoe repair and other businesses. The name of an old company, Lufti’s Fish Fry, is still engraved on a bright orange panel in front.

The Jeserich building, which dates from 1888 and is the oldest building in the group, has Victorian architectural features. Garrett said the Union Hill neighborhood had houses with similar characteristics.

“If you look at the intersection of 31st and Main, that specific corner is the last remaining corner of any architectural interest,” Garrett said. “… We consider 31st and Main to be one of our main entry points into the neighborhood.”

Carlos Moreno

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KCUR 89.3

The turret at the front of the Jeserich Building sits in other older homes in the downtown Union Hill neighborhood.

Preserving local history

Because they’re among the oldest structures still standing on Main Street, it’s all the more important to preserve them, Bunch said.

“It would have been a huge loss. We already have a lot of teeth missing on Main Street, and that would have been just another horrible hailstone,” Bunch said.

He noted that the city had already lost much of its historic building stock.

“We’re never going to get that back,” he said. “What I’d like to see is that instead of tearing down more historic buildings without a plan in place…I’d rather see people reusing buildings, historic buildings that are there as much as possible, and start filling in those that are empty. empty, dusty, gravelly lots and parking lots instead and add density to the city center.

Kevin Klinkenberg, president of Midtown KC Now, said his group supports a plan that reuses and preserves buildings.

“With the board action, maybe it gives people some time to dig deeper and see if there’s a way to make something work that’s doable for the developer and salvage some of the historic structures,” said he declared.

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Renaissance House Writers’ Retreat returns to Martha’s Vineyard in Dorothy West’s historic writing home – Our Time Press https://deepwood.net/renaissance-house-writers-retreat-returns-to-marthas-vineyard-in-dorothy-wests-historic-writing-home-our-time-press/ Sat, 07 May 2022 12:19:52 +0000 https://deepwood.net/renaissance-house-writers-retreat-returns-to-marthas-vineyard-in-dorothy-wests-historic-writing-home-our-time-press/ Renaissance House Retreat for Writers and Artists in Martha’s Vineyard will celebrate its 23rd season by offering three exciting writing programs in June, July and September 2022 at its original location in Oak Bluffs – a home where legendary novelist Dorothy West (“The marriage”) would write. Renaissance House is one of the few retreats designed […]]]>

Renaissance House Retreat for Writers and Artists in Martha’s Vineyard will celebrate its 23rd season by offering three exciting writing programs in June, July and September 2022 at its original location in Oak Bluffs – a home where legendary novelist Dorothy West (“The marriage”) would write.

Renaissance House is one of the few retreats designed for issue-oriented writers, writers of color, and social justice writers. Renaissance House offers writers and other artists a subsidized retreat from the responsibilities of life and a safe space in which to create new works of art. It is one of the few retreats designed for scholarly writers, writers of color, and social justice writers.

Abigail McGrath, Founder and CEO, Renaissance House Writers Retreat.

“Renaissance House focuses on writers who are going through different stages of their careers, from emerging writers working 9-5 jobs, to notable award winners,” explained Abigail McGrath, Founder of Renaissance House. “The goal of the program is to give artists time ‘alone’, away from their family, their work and the daily tasks that make up life. The retreat, located in the historic home where Helene Johnson and Dorothy West wrote, provides a safe space in which to create new works or complete existing ones. There are workshops in memoir writing, journalism, poetry, and many other aspects of writing. But the key is to have time to “stare into space”.

In addition to the traditional Renaissance House Writers-in-Residence program, a commuter program for island residents will be offered at a discounted rate. Additionally, a weekend writer’s retreat will be available for writer activists in September. The available dates are:

Weeks of June 19, June 26 and July 3 – Writing workshops for residential and suburban programs

September 16 – September 18 – Activist Writers Workshop Retreat

July 4 – Renaissance House will hold its annual public reading of Frederick Douglass’ historic speech on Inkwell Beach.

Renaissance House, a retreat for writers on social issues, is a program of the nonprofit Helene Johnson and Dorothy West Foundation for Artists In Need. Both of these women were residents of Martha’s Vineyard Island and prominent writers of the Harlem Renaissance. The application deadline for this program is June 6, 2022.

The Renaissance House program salons featured interviews with literary giants of Martha’s Vineyard such as Jill Nelson, Jessica Harris, Kate Feiffer, Susan Klein, Robert Hayden, Marty Nadler, Nat Benjamin, Shirley Craig, Brooks Robards, Janet Hill, Justen Ahern, Daniel Waters, Mike West and others.

Writers have educational workshops, one-on-one editorial advice, and most importantly, time. The retreat offers time to create new works or complete existing ones. Applicants may submit fiction, non-fiction, creative and problem-oriented non-fiction works to be submitted.
McGrath, author, actress and playwright, was raised by the leading ladies of the Harlem Renaissance. “My mother, Helene Johnson was a poet and summer resident who had to stop writing to support her family,” McGrath recalled. “My aunt, Dorothy West, was a year-round resident of Martha’s Vineyard who, despite her talent and previous fame, worked as a cashier at the Harbor Side restaurant in Edgartown until a Doubleday editor spotted her. writing in the local newspaper and giving him the opportunity to just “look at the trees and do nothing”. This allowed West to write “The Wedding,” a bestselling novel inspired by the interracial marriage of McGrath, the founder, and her niece. It was one of the last novels edited by fellow Vineyarder, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.
Participating writers include non-fiction writers Carolyn Brown, Linda Burnham, Jessica B. Harris and activist Caroline Hunter.

For more information, please contact Renaissance House at renaissancehse@aol.com

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Historic inauguration of the Hull-Daisetta rotating building https://deepwood.net/historic-inauguration-of-the-hull-daisetta-rotating-building/ Thu, 05 May 2022 21:00:03 +0000 https://deepwood.net/historic-inauguration-of-the-hull-daisetta-rotating-building/ Dignitaries and staff from the Texas State Archives and Library Commission in Austin and Rotary International clubs in southeast Texas gathered Saturday, April 30, on the grounds of the Sam Houston Regional Library and Research Center, affectionately known as locally the “Sam Center”. The reason for this was the inauguration and opening of the historic […]]]>

Dignitaries and staff from the Texas State Archives and Library Commission in Austin and Rotary International clubs in southeast Texas gathered Saturday, April 30, on the grounds of the Sam Houston Regional Library and Research Center, affectionately known as locally the “Sam Center”. The reason for this was the inauguration and opening of the historic Rotary Club Hull-Daisetta building and its permanent exhibition on the history of the building and the Hull-Daisetta club, which operated from 1926 until its dissolution in 1982. Built in 1927 and originally an octagonal shaped log cabin, the building was an important community center in early Hull-Daisetta after Hull Field went into full production in 1921, sparking a boom that led Hull and Daisetta to have a combined population of over 4,000 in the 1930s. The event was sponsored by the Lone Star Rotary E-Club, which meets via Zoom in the Southeast Texas Rotary District 5910. Many founding members of the E-Club were in attendance, including current president Ellen Pate and founding member Alana Inman, director of our Sam Center. Also in attendance was District 5910 Governor candidate Amy Killgore.

According to Inman, the Sam Center Library and Research Center has returned to normal business hours, meaning advance reservations are no longer required. The museum and park are also open Tuesday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. With its permanent exhibits, the Rotary Building is always accessible by visiting reception to obtain an access code.

One story caught this reporter’s attention among the many interesting stories about the historic building and the club. This is the story of how a small group of Liberty Rotarians and East Liberty County historians saved and preserved the building. According to long-time Rotarian Bill Buchanan and historian Patti Atkins, the story began when Patti’s father, associated with the Hull Water District, which used the old Rotary building for storage, called it a day , saying the district was considering tearing it down. Before they did, he asked if anyone might be interested in preserving it. Patti said she immediately called Bill Buchanan. Bill said he immediately called fellow Rotarian and friend Norman Dykes

In true Rotary spirit of “service above self” and an old-school “Get It Done” attitude, the three kicked into high gear. Simultaneously, the trio raised more than $5,000 and created a pledge from the Liberty Rotary Club, the Liberty County Historical Commission, and others for preservation efforts and a relocation agreement with the Sam Center to move the building to their property. Time passed and the wrecking crew was reduced, but the fun was just beginning. According to Bill, Norman Dykes, PE, and retired Liberty City manager took the lead. While Norman passed away in 2020, his wife Brenda was in attendance Saturday. She and Bill remembered Norman’s precise engineering drawings of the club building. Bill recounted how Norman personally led the dismantling of the faux fireplace, numbering each brick before cleaning and rebuilding. Buchanan has repeatedly praised Dykes saying, “None of this would have happened without Norman Dykes.”

Moving day finally arrived about 12 years ago; the original moving contractors to whom most of the $5,000 had been paid reneged on the job at the last minute, refusing to refund the money. According to Patti, she received another phone call, this time from Bill. Explaining the situation, which was complicated, Bill finally said, “We’re going to need a little more money: $6,700. Patti asked, “When?”

Bill replied, “By this afternoon to pay the new movers.” The move was in progress.

Accustomed to meeting such a challenge, Patti has moved up a gear. Reminiscent of an oil field project requiring an essential tool on a drilling rig or a rotating fried fish suddenly without enough cooking oil or worse, fish, this project was about to happen. But money was not the last obstacle.

On FM 1011, locally “Governor’s Road”, there were two bridges to cross. The measurements looked good but did not include the height of the bridge abutments. The house was 18 inches too low on the trailer. The new movers needed more old-fashioned cowboy engineering. According to Buchanan, using hydraulic jacks, the movers lifted the building onto blocks aboard the trailer, slowly crossing and repeating the process at each bridge.

Finally, the building was safely delivered to the Sam Center, where Patti was on hand with the $6,700 in cash raised on a Saturday morning. Restoration work would continue for another decade, culminating in today’s exhibit. While the stories of these three people tell only part of the story and are just three of many people involved, they are emblematic of how Rotary works and gets things done.

In Kitty Shivers Key’s 2013 book Hull in a Hand-basket and More, she reflects on how she and her father viewed life in “The Hub of the Universe”. If the Hull area was a hub, the octagonal Rotary building, emblematic of the Rotary logo, was a wheel. These Rotary members stimulated much more than the local economy of Hull.

Attending from Austin were Texas State Library and Archives Commission Chair Martha Wong; Jelain Chubb, State Archivist and Director of Archives and Information Services; Peggy Price, Education Outreach Coordinator; and Rebekah Manley, Center Book Coordinator.

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Plans for new homes near historic Nottinghamshire cottage denied https://deepwood.net/plans-for-new-homes-near-historic-nottinghamshire-cottage-denied/ Tue, 03 May 2022 13:15:49 +0000 https://deepwood.net/plans-for-new-homes-near-historic-nottinghamshire-cottage-denied/ Plans for new homes near a historic cottage that once housed a 19th-century artist should be turned down by councilors. In April, a decision on the application for up to three new homes to the rear of Ullyats Cottage was postponed by the Newark and Sherwood District Council Planning Committee. Opponents argue the building has […]]]>

Plans for new homes near a historic cottage that once housed a 19th-century artist should be turned down by councilors.

In April, a decision on the application for up to three new homes to the rear of Ullyats Cottage was postponed by the Newark and Sherwood District Council Planning Committee.

Opponents argue the building has historical significance because Victorian artist and illustrator Kate Greenaway grew up in the cottage in Fiskerton Road, Rolleston.

The Nottinghamshire county candidate also wants to realign a public footpath as part of the plan, which Rolleston Parish Council opposed.

The bid site was officially part of a Nottinghamshire County Council smallholding.

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But officers are recommending councilors deny the request at a May 10 planning meeting.

Ward Member Councilor Roger Blaney (Con) called the request to a planning committee because of the “too intensive development”.

The local parish council said: ‘The proposals were deemed to represent an overly intensive development of the site which would also adversely impact the setting and viability of the adjacent property, Ullyats Cottage, which is of significant local historical and cultural significance.

“Wider concerns have also been raised about insufficient secure parking, loss of trail amenity and provision of adequate service.”

Nottinghamshire Building Preservation Trust (NBPT) also objected to the plans and added that ‘land development would also have a detrimental effect on the amenity of the cottage’.

They said: “The loss of this open space and the effect on the existing public footpath, hedgerow and wildlife is unacceptable.”

Neighbors also commented on Ullyats Cottage’s ‘historical significance’ and raised concerns about wildlife impacts, parking and loss of privacy.

A decision on the plans will be made on May 10.

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Habitat for Humanity of Greater BR needs more volunteers to help build homes https://deepwood.net/habitat-for-humanity-of-greater-br-needs-more-volunteers-to-help-build-homes/ Sun, 01 May 2022 20:30:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/habitat-for-humanity-of-greater-br-needs-more-volunteers-to-help-build-homes/ BATON ROUGE, La. (WAFB) – Habitat for Humanity of Greater Baton Rouge is looking for volunteers to help build homes for the town. Habitat for Humanity of Greater Baton Rouge targets vacant and degraded properties to build new homes Richmond Park is an older historic neighborhood located near Mid City in Baton Rouge, but over […]]]>

BATON ROUGE, La. (WAFB) – Habitat for Humanity of Greater Baton Rouge is looking for volunteers to help build homes for the town.

Habitat for Humanity of Greater Baton Rouge targets vacant and degraded properties to build new homes

Richmond Park is an older historic neighborhood located near Mid City in Baton Rouge, but over time many of these homes are not in the best condition.

“The property was vacant, overused and really served as a dumping ground,” said Lynn Clark, executive director of Habitat for Humanity of Greater Baton Rouge.

However, near North 31st Street, a few properties are getting a makeover. What may look like an empty, demolished home will turn into a brand new home made entirely by Habitat for Humanity of Greater Baton Rouge.

“So to be able to acquire this property and build a beautiful home there, where a wonderful family will move in and take care of this property,” Clark added.

Habitat for Humanity works with the city to repair these abandoned homes, working specifically on properties that have been repossessed by the city due to tax liens.

“If we can take that and put it into commerce by building homes that will allow families to thrive and grow. It’s so much better for the community. It elevates the neighborhood, it makes the neighbors proud that their community is coming back,” Clark explained.

So far, the organization says 50 properties that were officially vacant and adjudicated are now in the hands of volunteers, who not only repair homes but also make other improvements in the neighborhood.

“We’re focusing on what we call infill, which is building into existing neighborhoods that may not have seen much development in recent years. So we’re building new houses next to existing houses,” Clark said.

It takes 220 volunteers to build just one house, and Habitat for Humanity is looking for others to help, so they can continue to help neighborhoods across the city.

Anyone interested in volunteering or enrolling in the home ownership program can click HERE.

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Copyright 2022 WAFB. All rights reserved.

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The owner of a historic building could be charged more than 60 times what he paid for the property https://deepwood.net/the-owner-of-a-historic-building-could-be-charged-more-than-60-times-what-he-paid-for-the-property/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 22:48:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/the-owner-of-a-historic-building-could-be-charged-more-than-60-times-what-he-paid-for-the-property/ SOUTH BEND, Ind. (WNDU) – A historic building, which once housed the South Bend Brewing Association, is to be demolished. Bought for just over $5,000.00 at a city-mandated tax certificate sale, demolishing the building will cost the owner at least 60 times that amount. The city said that due to the negligence of the new […]]]>

SOUTH BEND, Ind. (WNDU) – A historic building, which once housed the South Bend Brewing Association, is to be demolished.

Bought for just over $5,000.00 at a city-mandated tax certificate sale, demolishing the building will cost the owner at least 60 times that amount.

The city said that due to the negligence of the new owner, the building has become a risk to public safety.

S/Caleb Bauer/Deputy Executive Director of Community Investment/City of South Bend

“We saw and recovered bricks that fell on the street,” said Caleb Bauer, deputy executive director of Community Investment.

Built in 1905, the former South Bend Brewing Association building has steadily deteriorated since it was taken over by its new owner in 2019.

“We’re at the end of a long road of effort by many departments in the City of South Bend to try to get this building on the right track,” Bauer said.

According to Bauer, the city hoped the new owner would revitalize the building, and therefore the neighborhood, but instead said it neglected the building, putting it at a point of no return.

“The City of South Bend does not want to get into the demolition of historic buildings. In this case, this building poses a significant imminent risk to public safety, and therefore, because of this, it must be demolished,” Bauer said.

Bauer told 16 News Now that this not only posed a risk to public safety, but also posed a risk to people the owner allowed safely inside the structure.

“The owner is irresponsibly housing people on this site, in unsafe conditions,” Bauer said, adding that “the owner will be responsible for paying the cost of this demolition.”

Bauer said the owner will be charged at least 60 times what he paid for the building, although it could be much more than that because the owner has not allowed the city inside the building to fully assess the damage.

“That’s why the range is $300,000 to $1 million,” Bauer said.

According to Bauer, after the city relocates the people living illegally inside the building, demolition will begin in May.

We contacted the property owner, but he did not respond to our request for comment.

Copyright 2022 WNDU. All rights reserved.

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FACT SHEET: The small business boom under the Biden-Harris administration https://deepwood.net/fact-sheet-the-small-business-boom-under-the-biden-harris-administration/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/fact-sheet-the-small-business-boom-under-the-biden-harris-administration/ Thanks to the US bailout and the fair implementation of emergency relief programs, President Biden and Vice President Harris have fostered the strongest recovery on record for Main Street. In 2021, Americans asked to start 5.4 million new businesses, more than 20% more than any previous year on record. The boom in new business creation […]]]>

Thanks to the US bailout and the fair implementation of emergency relief programs, President Biden and Vice President Harris have fostered the strongest recovery on record for Main Street. In 2021, Americans asked to start 5.4 million new businesses, more than 20% more than any previous year on record.

The boom in new business creation has been particularly strong for entrepreneurs of color. In 2021, Hispanic Americans built new businesses at the fastest pace in over a decade and 23% faster than before the pandemic.

And, over three-quarters of 2021, small businesses with fewer than 50 employees added 1.9 million jobs, the fastest start to small business job growth on record.

This new White House report details America’s historic small business recovery and shows how the Biden-Harris program laid the foundation for this small business boom. By focusing on fighting the pandemic, providing Americans with greater financial security, and providing more than $450 billion in emergency relief for small businesses, the Biden-Harris administration has helped create the conditions of unprecedented business and job creation.

The Biden-Harris strategy to save and revitalize Main Street stands in stark contrast to Republicans’ latest tax plan in Congress. The Republican congressional proposal introduced by Sen. Rick Scott to impose a minimum tax on middle-class families would raise taxes on small businesses across the country. In addition to detailing the historic economic progress the Biden-Harris administration has made to date, the appendix includes a new state-by-state analysis of Congress’ Republican fiscal plan. Analysis shows that this tax plan would raise taxes for almost half of small business owners (6.1 million people), including 82% of small business owners earning less than $50,000 a year. Under Congressional Republicans’ plan, the typical small-business owner would see their taxes rise by nearly $1,200.

President Biden rejects Congressional Republicans’ plan to raise taxes on half of small business owners. Its four-pillar economic strategy for small business will reduce costs and level the playing field for families and small businesses. The plan focuses on:

1. Broaden access to capital,

2. Make landmark investments to help small businesses navigate available resources,

3. Leverage federal spending to support small businesses, and

4. Level the playing field for small business owners by reforming the tax code.

Read the full report here: https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/President-Biden-Small-Biz-Boom-full-report-2022.04.28.pdf

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Holiday home plan for historic Shrewsbury property https://deepwood.net/holiday-home-plan-for-historic-shrewsbury-property/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 05:01:30 +0000 https://deepwood.net/holiday-home-plan-for-historic-shrewsbury-property/ Shrewsbury Town Walls Tower is being converted into a holiday home The National Trust plans to convert Town Walls Tower in Shrewsbury into a holiday rental. The building is the last existing example of the defenses that would have surrounded the city in the 14th century. The heritage organization received plans approval from Shropshire Council […]]]>
Shrewsbury Town Walls Tower is being converted into a holiday home

The National Trust plans to convert Town Walls Tower in Shrewsbury into a holiday rental.

The building is the last existing example of the defenses that would have surrounded the city in the 14th century.

The heritage organization received plans approval from Shropshire Council earlier this year.

The building was occupied by tenants, and mainly used for storage, before the idea of ​​turning it into a seasonal rental.

As part of the proposal, the National Trust has now drawn up plans for a specially appointed architect to have a mandate to oversee work in the building – to ensure that any archaeological finds are properly maintained.

Town Walls is one of Shrewsbury’s most important historical sites and dates back to 1220.

Mark Agnew, managing director of Town Walls Tower, said they had already held open days in the building and planned to do so in the future.

He said: “The National Trust is currently undertaking conservation and refurbishment work on the Town Walls tower block in Shrewsbury, to create a one-bedroom holiday home.

“The work on the medieval watchtower will allow this historic building to return to regular use, while generating vital income to continue to care for it.

“As a conservation charity, the National Trust will preserve the historic features and appearance of the City Walls Tower, with no structural changes to the building in order to complete the conversion, nor any visual changes to the building exterior.

“The trust has also commissioned an external architect to undertake a monitoring mission while the work is in progress, to ensure that no archaeological features or artefacts are discovered and, if found, that they are carefully identified. and cared for.

“Over the past few years, the tower has been rented out to tenants and mainly used for storage.

“The National Trust has historically held six to eight open days for visitors throughout the year, with limited capacity due to the small nature of the building. These open arrangements will continue, to allow those interested to see inside this piece of Shrewsbury’s history.”

The tower of the town ramparts bears witness to Shrewsbury’s history as a strategically important settlement near the border with Wales.

It formed a key part of the defensive walls that once surrounded the city and is now the last surviving example of such defences.

The construction of the outer walls of Shrewsbury dates from 1220 and 1242.

Henry III issued a royal warrant urging the “men of Salop” to fortify the city, and grants for the construction of walls were granted during his reign.

The King visited Shrewsbury on several occasions, continuing his campaign against the Welsh forces.

By the 14th century the walls had fallen into disrepair and Henry IV commissioned a new rebuild.

The tower of the city walls was probably added at this time, when the city was in danger of being attacked.

A map from 1575 shows the city almost entirely encircled by walls featuring several similar towers.

Once it ceased to have a defensive purpose, the tower of the city walls was leased to the local population.

For the past 200 years it was the workshop of a watchmaker, John Massey in 1816, and was converted into a coachman’s dwelling in the 1860s.

The National Trust acquired it in 1930 and the tower was last occupied in the 1980s.

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Rediscovered slave quarters on West Campus help tell the story of urban slavery in Austin https://deepwood.net/rediscovered-slave-quarters-on-west-campus-help-tell-the-story-of-urban-slavery-in-austin/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 15:57:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/rediscovered-slave-quarters-on-west-campus-help-tell-the-story-of-urban-slavery-in-austin/ When Joe McGill visits Austin this weekend, he won’t be sleeping in a hotel or Airbnb like most travelers do. Instead, he’ll roll out a sleeping bag on the floor of a small, 167-year-old stone building and spend the night in what’s believed to be the only intact slave quarters in Austin. “That’s what I […]]]>

When Joe McGill visits Austin this weekend, he won’t be sleeping in a hotel or Airbnb like most travelers do. Instead, he’ll roll out a sleeping bag on the floor of a small, 167-year-old stone building and spend the night in what’s believed to be the only intact slave quarters in Austin.

“That’s what I do,” he said. “I find slave dwellings all over the country and ask the owners if I can spend the night in these spaces.”

McGill is the founder of The slave housing project. He travels the country to sleep in places where slaves once lived in order to draw attention to these spaces and the history of slavery in the United States. It also organizes presentations and discussions. on racism and racial equity that are open to the public. The project began 12 years ago when McGill, which does preservation work in South Carolina, noticed how sites, such as plantations or estates, often leave out stories of the slaves who lived there.

“They told the stories of the slavers, but they very rarely told the stories of those they enslaved,” he said. “And when they started telling their story, it was from the angle of the slavers. …So The Slave Dwelling Project gives slaves a voice and tells the story from their perspective.

This weekend, McGill is staying in the slave quarters at the Neill-Cochran House Museum, a Greek Revival house built in 1856 that now hosts exhibits of Austin art and history. Hundreds of UT Austin students walk the site daily. Located on San Gabriel Street in the heart of West Campus, the museum is surrounded by student apartment complexes and sorority and fraternity houses.

The Neill-Cochran House is one of Austin’s oldest homes, but it wasn’t until recent years that museum staff discovered that the two-story outbuilding behind the main house was originally used for house slaves. Now the Neill-Cochran House is trying to reincorporate that story into the museum’s narrative – and the story of Austin as a whole.

“Recognize the Past”

With researchers from UT Austin, the museum has started a project called “Reckoning with the Past: The Untold Story of Race in Austin.” Over the next year they will restore the slave quarters to their pre-war appearance and create exhibits and tours that focus on the structure’s connection to slavery in Austin. McGill’s visit this weekend marks the start of the project. the two day event includes talks and presentations on historic preservation and racial equity, as well as museum tours and community events.

“Most people don’t know [the slave quarters are] here,” said Rowena Houghton Dasch, the museum’s executive director. “It is the last intact slave home in Austin and a resource for all of us who would like to better understand our city’s past.”

The Neill-Cochran House Museum is a Greek Revival residence built in 1856. The slave quarters are visible to the right of the building and constructed of materials similar to those of the main house.

What is now known as the Neill-Cochran House Museum, named after the two families who lived there the longest, was originally an estate built on nearly 18 acres of land. In 1855, Washington and Mary Hill, a young married couple, commissioned established builder Abner Cook to build the house northwest of Austin. Cook, who was the architect behind several other historic sites in the city like Woodlawn and the Governor’s Mansion, used slave labor in his designs.

Like most white residents of the area at the time, the Hills were slavers. Their property included slave quarters outside the main house where the slaves worked and lived. The house was an expensive business for the Hills, and they struggled to keep it. They took out loans and sold five enslaved people to help pay. But when the house was finished, the Hills immediately sold it and never moved in. Over the next two decades, the new owners leased the site to various tenants, who brought slaves with them.

After the Civil War, new families who moved in used the former slave quarters for other purposes, and the history of the addiction was lost over time, Dasch said. When the National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in the State of Texas, the organization that turned the property into a museum, purchased the site in 1958, its former residents, the Cochrans, used the outbuilding as storage space. The family thought it might have been an old smokehouse, Dasch said.

Rowena Houghton Dasch (left), executive director of the Neill-Cochran House Museum, and Tara Dudley, a professor at the UT Austin School of Architecture, lead a project to reintegrate slave quarters into the museum's programming.

Rowena Houghton Dasch (left), executive director of the Neill-Cochran House Museum, and Tara Dudley, a professor at the UT Austin School of Architecture, are leading an effort to reintegrate slave quarters into the museum’s programming.

Then, around 2016, Dasch was researching and writing about the house when she realized that the original house had no space dedicated to house maintenance – no space for laundry. , cooking or storing cleaning products. So, she realized, all these things must have been done in buildings outside the main house. And by the time the house was built in the 1850s, a third of Austin’s population was enslaved. This domestic work would have been done by slaves, she concluded, and they would have lived in dependency.

“Once we realized what we had here, what we were stewards of,” she said, “it became, very quickly, very clear for us it was a story that we had to be able to share with the public.

Dasch reached out to Tara Dudley, an assistant professor at UT Austin’s School of Architecture, to help research and tell the story of this building. Over the past few years, the two, along with UT students, have delved into the history of the structure, determining what it was used for and who lived there.

Urban Servicing in Austin

Dudley says much of “Reckoning with the Past” will tell the stories of the slaves and laborers who inhabited space. One of the slaves that researchers were able to link to the site was named Lam. When the estate was used as a Texas Asylum for the Blind in the 1850s, the institute leased Lam, who was about 10 or 12 years old, to his slaver, who received compensation. Lam taught visually impaired students how to weave baskets.

“He did not have access to his body [and] certainly not the money his slaver got,” Dudley said. “But he was teaching a skill to these visually impaired youngsters…so they could have financial independence in their own lives, something he wasn’t. allowed to have even in his endeavors on this property.”

When the estate was inhabited by the Neill and Cochran families decades later, the slave quarters were used by domestic workers, Dudley said. Many of these workers were former slaves who lived just down the street in Wheatville, one of 15 freed communities established in Austin after emancipation. These workers will also be highlighted in the project.

“Being able to find these stories and repopulate this site with some of these people and their voices,” Dudley said, “is a hugely important part of this project and a practice that I think is helpful in engaging more closely with the story of Austin.

The slave dwelling is a two-story square building, and each floor is approximately 225 square feet.

The slave dwelling is a two-story square building, and each floor is approximately 225 square feet. A hatch in the ceiling connected the two floors.

Dasch says she thinks part of the reason this building has been misinterpreted for so long is that there aren’t many remnants of urban slavery left in Texas to compare it to. Most people associate slavery in Texas with the plantations, where small buildings or cabins away from the main house were typically used as slave dwellings. But in cities, slave quarters were often closer and aesthetically similar to the main house.

“As far as Texans talk about slavery in the antebellum period…it was about plantation slavery,” Dasch said. “So the fact that this building still exists opens a door to understanding urban slavery in Austin that the city really never acknowledged.”

The researchers say a major theme of this project will highlight the contributions of enslaved peoples in Austin.

“The focus here is on honoring skills, honoring work, honoring people and their lives, soul worth and all the things that are related to our site,” he said. Dash said. “And how those people who were human beings, regardless of what agency they were authorized or not, helped make Austin what it is today.”

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