Historic House – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 00:55:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://deepwood.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2-150x150.png Historic House – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ 32 32 Black Dog BBQ features ribs with a side of Harley Davidson https://deepwood.net/black-dog-bbq-features-ribs-with-a-side-of-harley-davidson/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 23:10:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/black-dog-bbq-features-ribs-with-a-side-of-harley-davidson/ TOPEKA, Kan. (WIBW) – The historic Harley Davidson Building, which is located at 21 St. and Topeka Blvd., also offers its visitors a meal at Bar-B-Que Black Dog located inside the historic building. Black Dog Bar-B-Que opened in 2009, and according to owner/partner Ray Moorhead, Black Dog Bar-B-Que is about to reach its 15th anniversary […]]]>

TOPEKA, Kan. (WIBW) – The historic Harley Davidson Building, which is located at 21 St. and Topeka Blvd., also offers its visitors a meal at Bar-B-Que Black Dog located inside the historic building.

Black Dog Bar-B-Que opened in 2009, and according to owner/partner Ray Moorhead, Black Dog Bar-B-Que is about to reach its 15th anniversary in a few months. Moorhead describes the restaurant combined with the historic Harley Davidson building as “one big wedding.”

“It’s a big wedding, historic Harley Davidson and Black Dog Bar-B-Que in the same building, because we lean on each other,” Moorhead said. “We welcome customers; they’re going to see the Harleys. They bring customers in there, they come and have a barbecue. It’s a great wedding. »

According to Moorhead, Black Dog Bar-B-Que offers its daily smokey combos on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. With smoked meatloaf on Tuesday, chunks of smoked sausage on Thursday and baby back ribs on Friday.

“They’ll fall meat from bones, that’s how they are,” Moorhead said. “We start our rib process 24 hours before we start cooking. They’re in an apple juice bath and then after that we put them in the oven for a couple of hours and then they come out and end up on the smoker.

Black Dog Bar-B-Que also sells its own barbecue sauce originally prepared by Moorhead’s mother years ago.

“The initiator of this was actually his mother many years ago,” Moorhead said. “We would only sell that here in the building and we probably sell around 700 bottles a year. It’s a great barbecue sauce, everyone who tries it loves it.

Jeff Lowe, the manager of Black Dog Bar-B-Que, says he enjoys working with Black Dog Bar-B-Que and seeing their regular customers.

“Oh, I love being back here, because I have regular customers,” according to Lowe. “There are guys who come here two or three times a week. You know, we really appreciate them.

Black Dog Bar-B-Que hours of operation include lunch hours Tuesday through Saturday 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and breakfast Saturday 9 a.m. to 10:25 a.m.

Black Dog Bar-B-Que is located at 2047 SW Topeka Blvd.

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Northwood house fire: Eerie CCTV reveals moment $24m waterfront mansion bursts into flames https://deepwood.net/northwood-house-fire-eerie-cctv-reveals-moment-24m-waterfront-mansion-bursts-into-flames/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 03:18:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/northwood-house-fire-eerie-cctv-reveals-moment-24m-waterfront-mansion-bursts-into-flames/ New security footage shows the moment a $24million Sydney mansion caught fire earlier this month. The Northwood house in Sydney’s Lower North Shore was destroyed by fire just after 11pm on Saturday September 3. Now NSW Police have released CCTV footage of a man walking towards the house moments before it was set on fire, […]]]>

New security footage shows the moment a $24million Sydney mansion caught fire earlier this month.

The Northwood house in Sydney’s Lower North Shore was destroyed by fire just after 11pm on Saturday September 3.

Now NSW Police have released CCTV footage of a man walking towards the house moments before it was set on fire, hoping the public can help with their investigation.

Watch the latest news on Channel 7 or stream for free on 7plus >>

WATCH THE VIDEO ABOVE: CCTV shows the moment the Sydney Mansion goes up in flames.

“As investigations continue, strike force investigators have released CCTV footage of a man who they believe may be able to assist them in their investigations,” they said in a statement.

“The man, dressed in dark clothing, can be seen on Cliff Road shortly before and after the fire started.”

No one was home at the time and no injuries were reported.

New security video has been released showing the moment a historic mansion caught fire on Sydney’s Lower North Shore. Credit: New South Wales Police
Firefighters were called to the property on Saturday evening to find it completely on fire. Credit: 7NEWS

Firefighters say they were faced with a massive blaze, with some flames reaching heights of 20m, according to Jim Murphy of Fire and Rescue NSW.

He said “very strong winds” were blowing embers, threatening nearby homes.

Police suspect the fire, which destroyed the house, may be arson.

“At the time, we realized we couldn’t save the house that was on fire,” Murphy told Weekend Sunrise.

“Firefighters were worried about nearby properties so they immediately got to work and protected those properties, while our two teams carried out a very quick search to see if anyone might have been inside.”

It took over an hour for more than 50 firefighters to bring the blaze under control.

The house before the Northwood fire. Credit: White Ray
The remains of the building on Sunday morning. Credit: 7NEWS

The six-bedroom house on Cliff Road – which also included four bathrooms, a wine cellar and a library – sold for $24.1million last November, according to online data.

The cause of the fire is under investigation.

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Why not honor the Queen by opening the gardens of Buckingham Palace? | rowan moore https://deepwood.net/why-not-honor-the-queen-by-opening-the-gardens-of-buckingham-palace-rowan-moore/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 15:15:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/why-not-honor-the-queen-by-opening-the-gardens-of-buckingham-palace-rowan-moore/ AAt some point, thoughts will turn to a monument to the late Queen. It has an £18.9 billion railway line named after it, as well as the old Olympic Park in east London, and some major bridges and other structures, but there is also a value in a place where people can go to remember […]]]>

AAt some point, thoughts will turn to a monument to the late Queen. It has an £18.9 billion railway line named after it, as well as the old Olympic Park in east London, and some major bridges and other structures, but there is also a value in a place where people can go to remember her.

There is some apprehension about the likely festival of absurd proposals on the subject, but there is hope. A tense discussion after Princess Diana’s death eventually led to a memorial fountain in Hyde Park which, after some technical issues were ironed out, turned out to be quite sweet and charming.

The key is to offer a tangible source of enjoyment rather than a pompous monument: my pitch is that the park-sized gardens of Buckingham Palace are open to the public, accessed by walkways in their forbidding wall . To avoid arguments over architectural style, each could be designed in any of the many practiced by British architects.

Last orders ?

A waiter wearing a face mask pours a pint in a London pub on November 3, 2020 on the eve of a second national lockdown due to Covid. Photography: Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images

There should be a special place in hell for people who move into an area and then campaign against a pub or venue that was there before they arrived, on the grounds that it creates disruption. Such seems to be the case with the Compton Arms in Islington, North London, a likely inspiration for George Orwell’s 1946 the description of his ideal pub, which is undergoing licensing review by four neighboring households, a process that could render him financially unviable.

A claim that the complainants came to the neighborhood during the lockdown is unverified, but it can be guessed that they arrived sometime after the pub was founded in the last century. If you don’t like it, the obvious question is, why did you choose to live nearby? One can only hope Islington Council, which will decide on the review later this month, will protect what is clearly an asset to the borough.

Diverse history

Strawberry Hill House, Twickenham, where Horace Walpole lived.
Strawberry Hill House, Twickenham, where Horace Walpole lived. Photograph: Graham Turner/The Guardian

When I visited Strawberry Hill, the fantastic 18th century neo-Gothic house in Twickenham, I found that guidebooks seemed unable to mention the likelihood that its creator, Horace Walpole, was gay, which some believe to be relevant to the way he designed it. They only timidly mentioned his “good friends”. The house’s website is silent on this subject. This suggests that custodians of historic houses need to be more, rather than less, aware of diversity, to be more awake, if you will.

Yet members of the National Trust, which does not own Strawberry Hill but has more than 500 properties in its care, are being asked to ‘deplore’ its involvement in ‘gay pride events’ in a motion ahead of its AGM in November. The motion comes from pressure group Restore Trust, which has also campaigned against highlighting links to colonialism and slavery in historic homes, and the trust itself defends its ‘culture of understanding and respect’ against opponents. Which, if you are one of its more than 5 million members, and can vote against the motion, I respectfully suggest you do.

Overcoming Bigotry

Marseille fans tear down a banner supporting Tottenham Hotspur during the UEFA Champions League match in London on September 7.
Marseille fans tear down a banner supporting Tottenham Hotspur during the UEFA Champions League match in London on September 7. Photography: Marc Atkins/Getty Images

I don’t mean to say that these Restore Trust activists are identical to the fascistic, black-clad ‘ultras’ among the fans of Olympique de Marseille football club, who last week tore down a Pride flag during a mini – riot after their defeat. by Tottenham Hotspur. On the other hand, the difference between the behavior of the two groups seems to be only a question of style. In any case, the action of the ultras shows that there is still a fight to be waged against violent sectarianism. Again, it’s good to vote.

Rowan Moore is the Observer’s architecture correspondent

  • Do you have an opinion on the issues raised in this article? If you would like to submit a letter of up to 250 words to be considered for publication, please email it to us at observer.letters@observer.co.uk

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Ridgewood Historic Site Restoration Delays, But Still Moving Forward https://deepwood.net/ridgewood-historic-site-restoration-delays-but-still-moving-forward/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 20:03:51 +0000 https://deepwood.net/ridgewood-historic-site-restoration-delays-but-still-moving-forward/ RIDGEWOOD, NJ — A long-awaited and much-requested update on the restoration of the Zabriskie-Shedler Historic Home and Estate in Ridgewood was provided Wednesday by Village Superintendent Heather Mailander at a council meeting. Shortly after an update was requested at the meeting by residents, one of whom expressed disappointment that the property several years after purchase […]]]>

RIDGEWOOD, NJ — A long-awaited and much-requested update on the restoration of the Zabriskie-Shedler Historic Home and Estate in Ridgewood was provided Wednesday by Village Superintendent Heather Mailander at a council meeting.

Shortly after an update was requested at the meeting by residents, one of whom expressed disappointment that the property several years after purchase had yet to be completed, Mailander assured that the project, which is now in its final phase, is “moving forward”.

“While updates and information (about the home and property) have been light and almost non-existent, I think we were avoiding interference,” Mayor Susan Knudsen said at the meeting. “I think, in all honesty, it worked out pretty well.”

The fence is in place, and berm work and other site improvements on the property have been approved and are nearing completion, the village said.

Internal demolition took place in late August and restoration of the space will take place very soon, Mailander said. She added that she was not yet sure of the restoration schedule and that she should have an update next week.

“There was a slowdown (in the work),” Knudsen said. “But I had the opportunity to stop by to view the property, and once (the contractor) starts all this work, it will be absolutely stunning.”

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Historic cities: 10 metros with the oldest houses | Entertainment News https://deepwood.net/historic-cities-10-metros-with-the-oldest-houses-entertainment-news/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 22:30:46 +0000 https://deepwood.net/historic-cities-10-metros-with-the-oldest-houses-entertainment-news/ When it comes to home ownership, some buyers prefer cities steeped in history, and given the opportunity, they would choose to restore a historic home to its former glory. Historic preservation is a way to maintain the unique character of a city and show its history. Although a popular concept in many cities, there are […]]]>

When it comes to home ownership, some buyers prefer cities steeped in history, and given the opportunity, they would choose to restore a historic home to its former glory.

Historic preservation is a way to maintain the unique character of a city and show its history. Although a popular concept in many cities, there are many places where some may feel differently. For example, in Japan, houses are often demolished every 30 years. In America, residents of Austin, Texas are also less likely to find historic homes: the city had the highest percentage of new homes, those built after 2014, in this data set.

For those looking for the charm of historic residences, New Jersey Real Estate Network collected Census Bureau data to determine which metropolitan areas have the most older homes. There are 23,842,900 homes built before 1949 in the United States, representing approximately 17% of all housing units.

Some cities on this list date back to colonial times. Other localities boomed as industry and rail transport developed. But in many small towns, people moved out after the collapse of the steel, mining, textile and railway industries, dramatically reducing demand for new construction.

The data for this ranking comes from the Census Bureau’s 2020 5-year American Community Survey. Subways are ranked by the percentage of the total number of housing units in the area that were built in 1949 or earlier. Displayed percentages are rounded.

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Historic house considered a museum for heroes https://deepwood.net/historic-house-considered-a-museum-for-heroes/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 14:11:23 +0000 https://deepwood.net/historic-house-considered-a-museum-for-heroes/ MAYOR Florentino “Ante” Tinio of San Isidro, Nueva Ecija, revealed plans during the recent 126th anniversary celebration of the “First Cry of Nueva Ecija” to convert the Sideco House into a museum for heroes. MALACAÑANG IN NUEVA ECIJA The first municipal hall in San Isidro, Nueva Ecija served as the official residence of General Emilio […]]]>

MAYOR Florentino “Ante” Tinio of San Isidro, Nueva Ecija, revealed plans during the recent 126th anniversary celebration of the “First Cry of Nueva Ecija” to convert the Sideco House into a museum for heroes.

MALACAÑANG IN NUEVA ECIJA The first municipal hall in San Isidro, Nueva Ecija served as the official residence of General Emilio Aguinaldo, the first president of the Philippines. It was actually the house of Captain Crispulo ‘Pulong’ Sideco, in whose honor it was called Sideco House. Also pictured are local government officials from San Isidro during recent wreath laying ceremonies to celebrate the 126th anniversary of the ‘First Cry of Nueva Ecija’. PHOTOS BY CELSO M. CAJUCOM

On March 29, 1899, the city of San Isidro was named the capital of the Philippines, as declared by General Emilio Aguinaldo, the recognized “first president of the Philippines”.

Sideco House, San Isidro’s first municipal hall, served as Aguinaldo’s official residence.

The house belonged to Captain Crispulo Sideco, popularly known at the time as “Pulong”.

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Highlights of the anniversary celebration included wreath laying ceremonies at hero and veteran markers in the town square and the organization of the “Likhang Isidorean Trade Fair”, which was attended by some 26 commercial ventures, and the “First Mayor Ante Tinio Bonsai Show and Contest.”

The San Isidro uprising has been labeled as Nueva Ecija’s first cry, stemming from Andres Bonifacio’s “First Cry of Balintawak” on August 23, 1896, which reverberated throughout the country when the latter led the tearing of their cedulas (residence certificates) as a symbol of the end of their subservience to Spain.

MALACAÑANG IN NUEVA ECIJA The first municipal hall in San Isidro, Nueva Ecija served as the official residence of General Emilio Aguinaldo, the first president of the Philippines.  It was actually the house of Captain Crispulo 'Pulong' Sideco, in whose honor it was called Sideco House.  Also pictured are local government officials from San Isidro during recent wreath laying ceremonies to celebrate the 126th anniversary of the 'First Cry of Nueva Ecija'.  PHOTOS BY CELSO M. CAJUCOM

MALACAÑANG IN NUEVA ECIJA The first municipal hall in San Isidro, Nueva Ecija served as the official residence of General Emilio Aguinaldo, the first president of the Philippines. It was actually the house of Captain Crispulo ‘Pulong’ Sideco, in whose honor it was called Sideco House. Also pictured are local government officials from San Isidro during recent wreath laying ceremonies to celebrate the 126th anniversary of the ‘First Cry of Nueva Ecija’. PHOTOS BY CELSO M. CAJUCOM

When the Novo Ecijanos rose in arms, historians today have called the uprising Nueva Ecija the first cry.

The plan of the rich “ilustrados” was quite well executed.

It was run by a few wealthy people with hardly a patriotic purpose but to get their friends out of jail after learning that Bonifacio was succeeding in his exploits in Manila.

Hundreds of their poor wards armed with homemade rifles and bamboo spears marched from Cabiao to Factoria (San Isidro) followed by a marching band – not the “musikong bumbong” or the “bamboo band”, but a marching band.

The musikong bumbong did not appear until after the Japanese invaded the Philippines.

The revolt was later labeled a “revolution” and “unang sigaw”, with the marchers managing to free some 160 prisoners.

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1811/The historic Kid Ory house closes its doors on October 1 – L’Observateur https://deepwood.net/1811-the-historic-kid-ory-house-closes-its-doors-on-october-1-lobservateur/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 17:04:16 +0000 https://deepwood.net/1811-the-historic-kid-ory-house-closes-its-doors-on-october-1-lobservateur/ 1811/The historic Kid Ory house closes on October 1 Posted 11:56 a.m. on Friday, September 2, 2022 LAPLACE — The historic 1811/Kid Ory house will close on Oct. 1, but museum founder John McCusker hopes the collection can one day reopen to the public. Located on Highway 628 in LaPlace, the former Andry/Woodland Plantation House […]]]>

1811/The historic Kid Ory house closes on October 1

Posted 11:56 a.m. on Friday, September 2, 2022

LAPLACE — The historic 1811/Kid Ory house will close on Oct. 1, but museum founder John McCusker hopes the collection can one day reopen to the public.

Located on Highway 628 in LaPlace, the former Andry/Woodland Plantation House opened in early 2021 and was very successful until the variant COVID-19 Delta and Hurricane Ida put a end to local tourism.

Owner Timothy Sheehan has allowed the museum to operate essentially rent-free for the past two years, giving locals and tourists the chance to visit the site that saw the origin of the largest slave rebellion in history of the United States and, later, the rise of jazz. pioneer Edward “Kid” Ory.

After the museum closes, McCusker intends to spend October applying for grants that would provide the funding needed to resume operations. The collection, which includes Ory’s valve trombone, sheet music and vintage records, will remain in place for the time being.

“We have been in the very good graces of the owner here for two years. The plan was to do it for a year, but the year was taken down by COVID-D and Ida. We did another year, and it really picked up. For the past two weeks, we’ve had so many people. Even then, we have a gap between what it costs to have this place here and the revenue we bring in,” McCusker said. “We are going to close in October and regroup. We’ve been around long enough now to qualify for grants that we wouldn’t have had before. Tim Sheehan has an incredible expense to pay here every month. I hope we can raise funds and find a solution that works for everyone. If we can find a way to make a return, we will.

Parts of the house date from 1790, making it one of the oldest structures in the area. For many years the property remained in the Montegut/Ory family. The house was unoccupied between 2005 and 2017. Without maintenance, the structure fell into disrepair over time. When current owner Sheehan purchased the historic home in March 2017, he embarked on an extensive renovation project to restore it to its former glory.

For the past two years, Sheehan has allowed McCusker and program manager Charlotte Jones to share the historic home with the public.

In addition to offering tours, the 1811/Kid Ory House has hosted several events over the past year, including a photo restoration effort in the aftermath of Hurricane Ida and several archaeological digs.

To commemorate the centenary of Ory’s band making their first recording, a May 2022 event at the house featured a tribute band to Kid Ory and the creation of a recording on a wax cylinder using a phonograph Edison 120 years old. Sybil Morial, former First Lady of New Orleans and descendant of Kid Ory’s family, celebrated Mother’s Day on the grounds of the museum.

McCusker hopes the collection can remain in the parish of St. John to provide insight into two interesting pieces of local history. For many years, McCusker was fascinated by the story of Kid Ory, a boy born in the cane fields who became a music industry legend. A component of American music still resides in the heart of LaPlace’s Woodland Quarters.
“There are so many things here that people can still relate to. When you find someone you can relate to, it makes the story interesting. Hopefully we can be a place for that,” McCusker said. “We are not giving up. From the Lieutenant Governor’s office to the local tourist commission and some of the other local historic sites have been very supportive. We hope we can put all our heads together and find a solution.

Historic 1811/Kid Ory House will continue to operate by appointment Wednesday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., during the month of September. Tickets can be obtained at 1811kidoryhistorichouse.com.

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Urban Archeology Corps helps young people explore New York’s past https://deepwood.net/urban-archeology-corps-helps-young-people-explore-new-yorks-past/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 15:07:54 +0000 https://deepwood.net/urban-archeology-corps-helps-young-people-explore-new-yorks-past/ Sometimes a pile of dirt is just that – and valid archeology nonetheless. Following the lead of Master of Anthropology in Public Archeology (MAPA) graduate students Jacob Bouffard and Kristin Clyne-Lehmann, nine students from the Poughkeepsie area have mapped several heaps, or mounds, in what was once the Kinderhook Orchard. by Martin Van Buren. The […]]]>

Sometimes a pile of dirt is just that – and valid archeology nonetheless.

Following the lead of Master of Anthropology in Public Archeology (MAPA) graduate students Jacob Bouffard and Kristin Clyne-Lehmann, nine students from the Poughkeepsie area have mapped several heaps, or mounds, in what was once the Kinderhook Orchard. by Martin Van Buren. The former president had an interest in agriculture, and the National Park Service (NPS) plans to recreate his prized orchard.

But with 12,000 years of human history, putting a shovel into the ground of the Hudson Valley can be risky business, at least from an archaeological perspective. The dirt piles may contain Aboriginal or historical artifacts.

Or not.

This summer, the NPS first offered the Urban Archeology Corps (UAC) in the Northeast region, with the help of interns from Binghamton University. The opportunity presented itself thanks to MAPA alumnus Lexi Lowe ’21, who decided to conduct a UAC pilot program during her internship at the NPS National Historic Sites in Hyde Park. She suggested that the Public Archeology Facility (PAF) in Binghamton would be a good fit, explained PAF director Laurie Miroff.

“The National Park Service came to see us; one of the reasons is that we do so much public outreach,” Miroff said. “It’s part of our mission at the PAF.”

UAC teaches youth ages 15-26 about archaeology, stewardship, and career opportunities in the parks system and beyond. The inaugural cohort was largely between the ages of 15 and 17.

Bouffard and Clyne-Lehmann are themselves from the Poughkeepsie area. For the first part of their eight-week internship, they designed the program in coordination with the NPS; the program itself lasted three weeks.

“It was a great opportunity to work with the National Park Service and learn about their approach to archeology and how I could be of use to them in advancing their youth and public outreach goals,” Bouffard said.

“Archeology is for everyone”

During their first week, UAC participants received training on the NPS’s Voluntary Archaeological Monitoring Program (VAMP). Archaeological sites require periodic assessment for looting, vandalism, or damage from natural causes, such as rodents or fallen trees; volunteers provide a pair of eyes needed to track this damage.

Students participated in digs during the second week at both the Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site and the Van Buren property. The National Park Service plans to restore the original rose arbor to the Roosevelt House; the students did shovel tests to look for the ancient poles that once supported it. They found post mold, which appeared as a dark spot in the dirt, Miroff said.

“It was one of the hottest weeks on record in the summer, and they were champions; they crossed,” Bouffard said. “We had the opportunity to learn some things while achieving some goals for the parks.”

“They will do hard work for the popsicles,” Clyne-Lehmann joked.

At the former Van Buren Orchard, now a woodlot, students mapped several mounds, noting their location and dimensions on graph paper, and conducted shovel tests. The NPS and the Stockbridge-Munsee Mohican community, whose ancestral land includes the site, are going to great lengths to avoid disturbing the ground, Clyne-Lehmann said.

Some of the mounds contained historical artifacts and required no further investigation. in his report to the NPS, Clyne-Lehmann recommended that they be protected when restoring the orchard.

Excavations have uncovered the mystery under the largest mound: a piece of plastic at the bottom.

The students were disappointed, but Clyne-Lehmann said their work still uncovered something important: data. NPS officials now know they don’t need to go to great lengths to protect this mound during the orchard restoration project.

Participants made field visits throughout the three weeks to contextualize the importance of VAMP. The Hudson Valley has a large number of archaeological sites in varying states of upkeep, ranging from well-preserved mansions to places linked to slaves or indigenous peoples.

“We were trying to give students a more diverse exposure to archaeological representation, because we were very aware that we were working with these rich sites,” Clyne-Lehmann said. “Archeology is for everyone.”

Although this year’s UAC was the first such program in the North East, it will not be the last. Over the past week, this year’s cohort has created training materials for future VAMP volunteers, including a PowerPoint, brochures, and a time-lapse video of an excavation.

The UAC internship was also meaningful for Bouffard and Clyne-Lehmann, offering them a chance to give back to budding archaeologists in their community. Growing up in Pauling, Bouffard didn’t hear about career opportunities in archeology and cultural resource management until he reached Dutchess Community College, he said.

“It was great to be able to spark that interest in the students and introduce them to the world I’ve been so involved in for the past three years,” he said. “It took them out of their comfort zone a bit and also changed the public perception of archeology a bit. It’s not just something that professors do in distant universities; it’s in their own backyard.

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Historic Homes and Large Gardens in Starved Rock Country – Shaw Local https://deepwood.net/historic-homes-and-large-gardens-in-starved-rock-country-shaw-local/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 16:20:25 +0000 https://deepwood.net/historic-homes-and-large-gardens-in-starved-rock-country-shaw-local/ Starved Rock Country is home to beautiful historic homes and extensive manicured gardens. Enjoy the intersection of history, design and nature with six popular home and garden tours. History comes alive in these places, whose legacies intertwine with notable historical moments such as the monumental civil engineering project that was the I&M Canal, the first […]]]>

Starved Rock Country is home to beautiful historic homes and extensive manicured gardens. Enjoy the intersection of history, design and nature with six popular home and garden tours. History comes alive in these places, whose legacies intertwine with notable historical moments such as the monumental civil engineering project that was the I&M Canal, the first Lincoln-Douglas Debate, and the Underground Railroad. To soak up some of the fascinating historical stories or just to relax in nature, visit these exciting attractions.

Hegeler-Carus House

1307 Seventh Street, LaSalle

www.HegelerCarus.org

Designed by WW Boyington, the famous architect of Chicago’s water tower, the Hegeler Carus Mansion in LaSalle has remained virtually unchanged since its completion in 1876. The 16,000 square foot mansion features 56 rooms spread over seven levels. The interior is just as stunning as the exterior, with its intricate parquet floors and hand-painted ceilings. The national monument is open for visits from Wednesday to Sunday all year round.

Weber Home and Garden

1503 Baker Street, St.

www.WeberHouseAndGarden.com

Streator’s Ted Weber, a former nationally syndicated radio interviewer, began renovating his historic childhood home in 1983. The house now sports beautifully decorated bedrooms, each reflecting a different period of design, and a garden of meticulously maintained English style. The unique blend of architecture, horticulture, interior design and broadcast history is open for tours seven days a week from April through October.

Reddick Manor

100 West Lafayette Street, Ottawa

www.ReddickMansion.org

The Reddick Mansion, a wonderfully unique landmark, stands on the corner of Columbus and Lafayette streets in Ottawa, overlooking the site of the Lincoln Douglas Debate. The 150-plus-year-old, 22-bedroom Italianate mansion was painstakingly restored in the 19th-century period, after decades of use as the city’s public library. Now the mansion is open year round for tours from Friday to Monday.

Hornbaker Gardens

22937 1140 North Avenue, Princeton

www.HornbakerGardens.com

Located a short drive from downtown Princeton and less than 45 minutes from Starved Rock State Park, you’ll find a floral oasis in a sea of ​​cornfields and forests. Hornbaker Gardens, known far and wide for the remarkable varieties of hostas it grows, is a top destination for gardening enthusiasts across the Midwest. It merges the best aspects of high-end garden centers and big-name arboretums, making a trip to Hornbaker Gardens a great way to enjoy nature while shopping.

Owen Lovejoy Homestead

Rural Route 3 East Peru Street, Princeton

www.OwenLovejoyHomestead.com

The Owen Lovejoy Homestead, built in 1838, was the home of a famous abolitionist minister, congressman and instrumental member of the Underground Railroad. Inside the impeccably restored Greek Revival-style house, you’ll find bedrooms with period furnishings, including one that contains a concealed compartment in which runaway slaves are said to be hidden. On the property you will also find the fully restored 1849 Colton One-Room Schoolhouse. Call 815-875-2616 for dates and times the farm is available for tours.

House Pulsifer

Highway 71, Hennepin

www.VillageOfHennepin.com

Built in 1844, the Federalist-style townhouse features five fireplaces, elaborate original woodwork, skylights, servants’ quarters and a luxurious kitchen for the time. The property changed hands over the years before being deeded to the town of Hennepin, who restored the 2.5-story brick house, earning it a spot on the National Register of Historic Places. The Pulsifer House now serves as the headquarters of the regional historical society and is generally open for tours from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays.

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Take a look at historic homes before the tour https://deepwood.net/take-a-look-at-historic-homes-before-the-tour/ Sat, 27 Aug 2022 12:00:42 +0000 https://deepwood.net/take-a-look-at-historic-homes-before-the-tour/ Ready to go back in time ? Fort Collins homes rich in history and unique architectural style will be on display Sept. 17 as part of the Poudre Landmarks Foundations Annual Historic Home Tour. The tour will include seven stops, with regular favorites like the 1879 Avery House on Mountain Avenue and the city’s historic […]]]>

Ready to go back in time ?

Fort Collins homes rich in history and unique architectural style will be on display Sept. 17 as part of the Poudre Landmarks Foundations Annual Historic Home Tour.

The tour will include seven stops, with regular favorites like the 1879 Avery House on Mountain Avenue and the city’s historic 1883 Water Works building on the North Overland Trail. But this year will also mark a leap into the mid-20th century, with a handful of mid-century homes, a pair of 1950s and 1960s Airstream trailers, and a 1920 Southern mansion-turned-fraternity home that was saved in the 1970s and moved from College Avenue to a quiet Fort Collins subdivision.

Tickets are $25 in advance or $30 on the day of the visit. They are available for purchase at powderlandmarks.org or at the following locations: Ace Hardware of Fort Collins, 1001 E. Harmony Road; Downtown Ace Hardware, 215 S. College Ave.; The Closet, 152 S. College Ave.; Josephs’ Hardware and Home Center, 2160 W. Drake Road, or The Perennial Gardener and Sense of Place, 154 and 160 N. College Ave.

Here are some of the stops on this year’s tour.

The Shaw House, 1508 Buckeye Street.

The Shaw House was built in 1920 by barrister MH Shaw and his wife.  Throughout its life, the house served various families and a fraternity before being moved from 1325 S. College Ave.  at its current location in the Prospect Estates neighborhood.

Southern antebellum architecture meets a 1960s Fort Collins subdivision with The Shaw House – a stately two-story Classic Revival home with Doric columns in the Prospect Estates neighborhood. So why is this classic home tucked away on an unassuming housing estate street? Well, it hasn’t always been there. The 1920 home was originally built at 1325 S. College Ave. by lawyer MH Shaw, with its architecture serving as a nod to his wife’s Southern roots. After changing hands a few times, the house was finally sold to Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity in 1948 and served as the chapter house until the early 1970s. Although it was nearly demolished in 1974, the Local couple Harry and Evie McCabe stepped in to buy and move the house to its current location.

Source: Bill Whitley and the Landmarks Powder Foundation

The Johnston House, 1432 Meeker Drive

The Johnston House was built at 1432 Meeker Drive in 1964, representing the three-level house design made popular after World War II.

Billed as a “mid-century mashup”, this three-level house was built by Mr. and Mrs. Dick Johnston in 1964. But despite its mid-century construction date, the Powder Landmarks Foundation points out that three-level houses levels originated in the 1930s as architects looked to design more compact housing on smaller lots. After World War II, the tri-level took off in the United States, serving as the anchor house design in subdivisions across the country. While home to modern updates, the Johnston House still has some remnants of its original design, including its 1960s two-sided fireplace and geometric brick exterior patterns.

Source: Robin Stitzel and the Landmarks Powder Foundation

The Riffenburgh Residence, 1424 Meeker Drive

The Riffenburgh Residence, 1424 Meeker Drive, was built in 1963 for Riffenburgh Elementary School's namesake Waldo Riffenburgh and his wife.

The Johnston House isn’t the only mid-century offering on this year’s historic home tour. In fact, it’s not even the only featured house on Meeker Drive – there are actually four. The Riffenburgh Residence was designed and built at 1424 Meeker Drive for attorney Waldo Riffenburgh – the namesake of nearby Riffenburgh Elementary School – and his wife, Pearl, in 1963. After several modifications in the 1980s and 1990s , the current owners of the house have worked to bring it back to its mid-century roots.

Source: Jodie Chamberlain and the Landmarks Powder Foundation

Airstream Trailers

Pearl's 1961 Tradewind Airstream trailer will be on display for the 2022 Historic Homes Tour, showing off its original mid-century fittings.

A pair of Airstream trailers will also be on display as part of this year’s tour. Janell Prussman’s 1950 Flying Cloud Airstream and 1961 Tradewind Airstream serve as little mid-century time capsules. While the 1950 trailer has been refurbished and the 1961 one has also been updated, Prussman still has written records from the first owner of the 1961 trailer, including a typed journal of his cross-country travels.

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