Historic House – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 21:34:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://deepwood.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2-150x150.png Historic House – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ 32 32 Princeton University Reaches Compromise With Historic Preservation Supporters Of Prospect Avenue To Save Buildings, With Details Outlined In Memorandum Of Understanding https://deepwood.net/princeton-university-reaches-compromise-with-historic-preservation-supporters-of-prospect-avenue-to-save-buildings-with-details-outlined-in-memorandum-of-understanding/ https://deepwood.net/princeton-university-reaches-compromise-with-historic-preservation-supporters-of-prospect-avenue-to-save-buildings-with-details-outlined-in-memorandum-of-understanding/#respond Thu, 21 Oct 2021 21:29:08 +0000 https://deepwood.net/princeton-university-reaches-compromise-with-historic-preservation-supporters-of-prospect-avenue-to-save-buildings-with-details-outlined-in-memorandum-of-understanding/ The old Court Club building would be moved in front of its current location and one of the three Victorian Queen Anne’s would be moved behind the other two houses, thus saving the three houses. Princeton University officials backed down from threats to demolish a former dining club on Prospect Avenue if the school was […]]]>
The old Court Club building would be moved in front of its current location and one of the three Victorian Queen Anne’s would be moved behind the other two houses, thus saving the three houses.

Princeton University officials backed down from threats to demolish a former dining club on Prospect Avenue if the school was not allowed to demolish three Victorian Queen Anne homes across the street and relocate the old restaurant club on site.

A memorandum of understanding outlines the details of an agreement between Princeton University and the Princeton Prospect Foundation, a non-profit organization that works to preserve and restore buildings of historical and architectural significance owned and occupied by the restoration clubs at Princeton University and to educate the general public about history and architecture buildings. The Princeton Prospect Foundation worked with the Princeton Historic Commission to create a historic district on Prospect Avenue. A subcommittee is working on the language for the creation of the district and is expected to vote on the recommendation to create the district next month. The Planning Board and Princeton Council should then consider the proposal.

Princeton University submitted plans for its new 600,000 square foot Environmental Studies and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences project in November 2020. The project, which will be located along Ivy Lane at south of Prospect Avenue and dining clubs, will provide state-of-the-art facilities for seven university departments focused on science and engineering. A sticking point of the project has been the university’s desire to demolish three houses it owns across from the proposed development at 110, 114 and 116 Prospect Avenue and to relocate the Court Clubhouse building, currently located on the other side. from the street, on the site. The building is still used as an office for the school’s dean of research.

Prospect the houses in the north
The three homes of university officials wanted to demolish them.

Over the past few months, the planning board has heard hours of testimony and public commentary on the homes and the former catering club. Opponents of the plan include several prominent city planners, architectural historians and curators who live in the Princeton area. Nearly 2,000 residents have signed a petition opposing the demolition of the three historic houses. And last month, city staff and a few members of the planning board reacted to the proposal. Last month, a question was also raised regarding the creation of a buffer zone between the residential district and the university buildings almost two decades ago and promises not to construct new buildings on the site.

Details of the new MoU

KyuJung Whang, vice president of facilities at Princeton, wrote a memorandum of understanding on October 20, just a day before the next scheduled planning board hearing on the project, detailing the compromise reached with the Princeton Prospect Foundation.

“Over the past few weeks, based on feedback received during planning council hearings, the university’s project team has been working to assess the feasibility of an alternative design that would preserve the four structures,” it read. in the memorandum of the university officials. “Following recent discussions with (the) Princeton Prospect Foundation, which benefited from expert advice from city staff, on October 18, 2021, the university submitted an updated plan to the Princeton Planning Board for review during its meeting on October 21, 2021. “

The old Court Club would be moved from 91 Prospect Avenue to a site across the street, but closer to the North Garage than the university’s original proposal. 114 Prospect and 116 Prospect would remain in place, but 110 Prospect would be moved by the university to a site near the back of 114 and 116 Prospect.

If the university’s plan to relocate 91 Prospect is approved by the Planning Council and is not challenged by residents or the Princeton Prospect Foundation, Princeton University is committed to:

  1. Support the creation of a new local historic district being considered by the Princeton Historic Preservation Commission called “Prospect Avenue Historic Dlstrlct” which would include the sites where the 91 Prospect Avenue Court Clubhouse has been relocated, the structure moved from 110 Prospect Avenue and the existing 114, 116 and 120 structures from Prospect Avenue. The university would agree to include the Ferris Thompson walkway and associated brick wall in the neighborhood.

2. Within six months of the relocation of 91 Prospect and 110 Prospect, the university would submit an application to the State Historic Preservation Office and the National Park Service requesting an adjustment of the historic district boundaries of the State and Federal Government of Princeton to add the moved 91 Prospect. Court Club, the relocated house from 110 Prospect Avenue, existing homes 114, 116, and 120 Prospect Avenue, as well as the Ferris Thompson walkway and brick wall associated with the neighborhoods.

3. The university promised to rehabilitate the 110, 114 and 116 Prospect in a way that meets the Home Secretary’s standards for handling historic properties. Currently, the houses are dilapidated. The former Court Club building would still serve as the office of the Dean of Research. Both 110 and 114 Prospect would be used for housing, and 116 Prospect would continue to be used for offices.

4. The university would also work with the Princeton Prospect Foundation to develop a landscaping plan for the Prospect Avenue facade of the Theorists’ Pavilion which is part of the new Environmental Studies and Faculty of Engineering and Research Building. Applied Science. The theoreticians’ pavilion will use the land where the Court Club is currently located.

“Finally, we note that we commemorate the above commitments, made during our recent discussions with the PPF and municipal staff, at the request of the Foundation,” reads the memorandum. “PPF, in turn, has assured its full support for the project given the planned update of the site plan and the University commitments described above. “

Princeton Planning Council will continue its review of the plans for Prospect Avenue in 7 p.m. Thursday evening October 21 via Zoom.

The boundaries of the proposed historic district of Prospect Avenue.


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The Tyler wins sustainability and historic preservation awards https://deepwood.net/the-tyler-wins-sustainability-and-historic-preservation-awards/ https://deepwood.net/the-tyler-wins-sustainability-and-historic-preservation-awards/#respond Wed, 20 Oct 2021 13:32:42 +0000 https://deepwood.net/the-tyler-wins-sustainability-and-historic-preservation-awards/ EAST HAVEN, CT – The Tyler, a mixed-income senior apartment community created by WinnDevelopment inside the old East Haven High School has won two more awards for its innovative approach using tax credits federal and state historical heritage to incorporate the most stringent industry standard for energy performance into a historic adaptive reuse residential project. […]]]>

EAST HAVEN, CT – The Tyler, a mixed-income senior apartment community created by WinnDevelopment inside the old East Haven High School has won two more awards for its innovative approach using tax credits federal and state historical heritage to incorporate the most stringent industry standard for energy performance into a historic adaptive reuse residential project.

Patch was there in October 2020 for the opening of the 55+ apartment development in the three-story core of the 84-year-old apartment building, the first in the United States to use historic federal tax credits and states for a passive rehabilitation of the house.

The Connecticut Green Building Council nonprofit recognized the 70-unit development with its 2021 Excellence Award, which honors excellence in the design and construction of green buildings that supports the broader goals of using the built for address climate change in the state of Connecticut and beyond. .

The latest awards follow The Tyler’s recognition as the nation’s best overall development and green building in Affordable Housing Finance magazine’s 2020 Readers’ Choice Awards, as well as a 2021 Connecticut Preservation Merit Award.

Designed and built to the Passive House Institute’s rigorous EnerPHit standard with applicable historical exclusions, the Tyler is expected to use 20% less energy than a new ENERGY STAR building. By reallocating the old school building, the development avoided 18,000 metric tons of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per year, ie the annual energy consumption of 1,900 households. In addition, a 90-kilowatt rooftop solar photovoltaic system contributes even greater carbon reductions by producing more than 100,000 kilowatt-hours of clean, renewable energy each year.

In addition to the CTGBC recognition, The Tyler was also honored last week with the Novogradac Journal of Tax Credit Award 2021 for historic rehabilitation as a residential development best illustrating “major impact on the community”. Based in San Francisco, Novogradac is a national professional services organization that provides accounting, valuation and consulting expertise with a major focus in the real estate industry.

“Projects like The Tyler demonstrate the sustainability inherent in adapting historic structures to meet 21st century environmental expectations,” said Adam Stein, executive vice president of WinnDevelopment. “This award-winning effort would not have been possible without the foresight and support of the Connecticut Department of Housing, the Connecticut Housing Finance Agency, and the State Historic Preservation Office.”

Managed by WinnResidential, The Tyler officially opened in October 2020. The 104,871 square foot brick building had been vacant for almost 21 years after serving as the city’s high school since 1936. The WinnDevelopment project has preserved and restored the property while transforming the university core of the building into 67 one-bedroom units and three two-bedroom units serving the full range of incomes.

“The Tyler addresses a critical need for affordable housing in East Haven,” said CHFA President and CEO Nandini Natarajan. “WinnDevelopment’s adaptive reuse of property has created a lasting asset that will benefit the community for decades to come.”

Funding for the $ 21.5 million project came from federal low-income housing tax credits from CHFA; National Park Service and SHPO historic rehabilitation tax credits; the Connecticut Department of Housing (DOH) Flex program reduced debt; financing the construction of Bank of America and Citizens Bank; Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston Affordable Housing Program Fund; United Illuminating energy rebates; partnership capital from Bank of America and a low-interest permanent loan from BlueHub Capital (formerly Boston Community Capital). As a project partner, the City of East Haven agreed to a 10-year deferred property tax structure.

“The rehabilitation of historic East Haven High School demonstrates what Tories have been saying for decades – that historic preservation, conservation and energy efficiency are not competing goals,” said Julie Carmelich, administrator of the tax credit landmark for the Connecticut State Historic Preservation Office. “Our team thanks WinnDevelopment and its team of architects, contractors and consultants for all their hard work and vision.”

Funding for the $ 21.5 million project came from federal low-income housing tax credits from CHFA; National Park Service and SHPO historic rehabilitation tax credits; the Connecticut Department of Housing (DOH) Flex program reduced debt; financing the construction of Bank of America and Citizen’s Bank; Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston Affordable Housing Program Fund; United Illuminating energy rebates; partnership capital from Bank of America and a permanent low-interest loan from BlueHub Capital (formerly Boston Community Capital). As a project partner, the City of East Haven agreed to a 10-year deferred property tax structure.

East Haven Mayor Joseph A. Carfora praised WinnDevelopment et al and called The Tyler “a real success.”

“I was delighted to learn that Winn had once again been honored for his advanced approach to the use of federal and state tax credits in the development and reallocation of historic residential facilities like The Tyler,” a- he declared. “Winn at all levels has been a partner and continues to be a partner in our community, which is why we continue to discuss with them the absolute best goal for the back of the ‘old’ high school, parts of which are also historic. “


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Morton named IJ player of the week after historic night | High school https://deepwood.net/morton-named-ij-player-of-the-week-after-historic-night-high-school/ https://deepwood.net/morton-named-ij-player-of-the-week-after-historic-night-high-school/#respond Tue, 19 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/morton-named-ij-player-of-the-week-after-historic-night-high-school/ Greenwood full-backs and strength coach Chris Seaborn knew it would be a special night; but like everyone in attendance at JW Babb stadium on Friday, he had no idea how special it was going to be. Then he heard an announcement over the intercom. Greenwood junior full-back Ve Morton broke the ground running record in […]]]>

Greenwood full-backs and strength coach Chris Seaborn knew it would be a special night; but like everyone in attendance at JW Babb stadium on Friday, he had no idea how special it was going to be.

Then he heard an announcement over the intercom.

Greenwood junior full-back Ve Morton broke the ground running record in one game, totaling 335 yards in the Eagles’ 35-28 win over Greer. His efforts earned him IJ Player of the Week honors for the second week in a row.

“He had a few points in the first half and I kind of knew that when everything he was running was for positive gains and nothing was falling apart in the backfield,” Seaborn said. “It was really fun to watch.”

Morton also recorded a high of 39 carries in his first career 300-yard rushing performance. Despite the accolades, Morton will be the first to say that he was not the only one to achieve this accomplishment.

“It feels good to know that I broke the record,” said Morton. “I have to give my offensive lineman a lot of credit. They come weekly and work hard. The whole offense did (well).

Seaborn said that on one of Morton’s two long runs of 50 yards or longer, it was because of the guard and tackle on the weak side that gave Morton the room he needed to break free.

The long runs gave Greenwood the boost he needed against Greer. The Eagles, pioneers in Morton’s performance, dominated possession time holding the ball for over 30 minutes. This is also due in part to Morton, who refused to be denied in the second half.

“I don’t like to lose,” Morton said. “I compete in everything I do.”

Seaborn said he saw this competitiveness firsthand. He and Morton had a billiard rivalry that began after Morton’s tutoring sessions at Seaborn. Seaborn said that whatever the activity, Morton thinks he’s the best whether he’s played it before or not.

The sessions, normally reserved for seniors preparing for the SAT, have been open to juniors this season.

“I beat him more times than he beat me, but he had one night where he beat me two or three times in a row,” Seaborn said. “He’s going to approach that, whether he’s good, bad, or indifferent, saying, ‘I’m the best at it. “”

Contact sports writer James Benedetto at 864-223-1814 or follow on Twitter @james_benedetto.


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Large-scale fire destroys Light-House Recovery Program building in Fresno, leaving 12 people displaced https://deepwood.net/large-scale-fire-destroys-light-house-recovery-program-building-in-fresno-leaving-12-people-displaced/ https://deepwood.net/large-scale-fire-destroys-light-house-recovery-program-building-in-fresno-leaving-12-people-displaced/#respond Mon, 18 Oct 2021 04:32:31 +0000 https://deepwood.net/large-scale-fire-destroys-light-house-recovery-program-building-in-fresno-leaving-12-people-displaced/ FRESNO, Calif. (KGPE) – A historic downtown Fresno home was lost after it caught fire on Sunday afternoon. The house near Van Ness Avenue and San Joaquin Street was used as housing by the women in the Light-House Recovery program. There were 12 people in the house when the fire broke out. All were safely […]]]>

FRESNO, Calif. (KGPE) – A historic downtown Fresno home was lost after it caught fire on Sunday afternoon.

The house near Van Ness Avenue and San Joaquin Street was used as housing by the women in the Light-House Recovery program.

There were 12 people in the house when the fire broke out. All were safely evacuated, but now they need a place to live.

“As we got closer, I could see the smoke, that’s when it came true,” said Vikki Luna, director of the Light-House Recovery Program.

Luna has been sheltering women and helping them recover from their addiction at this downtown Fresno home for nearly a decade.

“This is their home and this is where their life is changed,” Luna said.

Everything changed on Sunday when the house caught fire while work was being done on the roof.

Fresno Fire Battalion Chief Tim Fulmer says because the building is over 100 years old, it is more flammable and the fire spread quickly, requiring 40 firefighters and 10 engines.

“Our teams were able to get inside quickly, but were also quickly overwhelmed by the amount of fires going on,” Fulmer said.

Fortunately, the 12 women living inside the house were safely evacuated. Now Luna hopes other nonprofits will help them find temporary refuge while her organization finds a way to rebuild itself.

“When something like this happens, the community really comes together. We can disagree in different areas of our life, but when it comes to people in need of help, we seem to come together here in our city, ”said Luna.

As to the cause of the fire, it is under investigation, but there is speculation that it relates to the work that was carried out on the roof.

If you would like to donate to the Light-House recovery program, you can visit their website.


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Historic Nob Hill Home with ‘Spectacular’ San Francisco Views Asks $ 17 Million https://deepwood.net/historic-nob-hill-home-with-spectacular-san-francisco-views-asks-17-million/ https://deepwood.net/historic-nob-hill-home-with-spectacular-san-francisco-views-asks-17-million/#respond Sat, 16 Oct 2021 19:57:35 +0000 https://deepwood.net/historic-nob-hill-home-with-spectacular-san-francisco-views-asks-17-million/ Known as the Boggs-Shenson House, the beautiful bay town space is a local landmark and may even have a connection to celebrities. First purchased in 1906 by Angus and Mae Boggs, the original structure of the property was destroyed by the devastating city earthquake and fire a month later. A second building was constructed in […]]]>

Known as the Boggs-Shenson House, the beautiful bay town space is a local landmark and may even have a connection to celebrities.

First purchased in 1906 by Angus and Mae Boggs, the original structure of the property was destroyed by the devastating city earthquake and fire a month later. A second building was constructed in its place, and over time the original two-story house built for the Boggs was extended to four floors plus an elevator.

In the 1940s, Mae sold the house to brothers and doctors Ben and Jess Shenson, according to Business intern.


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The views are “nothing short of spectacular,” the listing notes. Viewpoints include the Golden Gate and Bay Bridges, Coit Tower, Transamerica Pyramid, San Francisco Bay, and Grace Cathedral.

The house last changed hands in 2018 for $ 8 million, although it asked for more than double that earlier in the year.

The house was bought by an LLC linked to the billionaire’s real estate transactions Sean Parker. We don’t know if Facebook’s CEO was the buyer three years ago, but whoever he is, he has to make a package based on the listing price.

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Watch: Everywhere you look, the updated “Full House” will blow your mind

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Serious capital will be needed to land this one-of-a-kind find. Hailed as a “hidden gem” and oasis of luxury, “the five-bedroom brown shingled residence is listed on the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

One of the few single-family homes on Nob Hill, the Craftsman-style structure sits on double lot.

Modernized in the right places, it has three outdoor living areas, an open living and dining area with fireplace, and access to a terrace with an outdoor kitchen and pizza oven.

A spacious chef’s kitchen features wood cabinetry, stone countertops, a breakfast bar, and views of the Golden Gate Bridge.

The rooftop patio has a wet bar and glass doors that open onto another large deck with a gas fireplace and seating areas.

The master suite with private balcony offers views of the Coit Tower. It has two walk-in closets and the private bathroom is fitted with a bathtub and double sinks.

Other amenities include a wine cellar, media room, office, and a two-car garage with an electric vehicle charging station.

The grounds include fruit trees, seating areas and even a putting green.

Franck Costa along with Vanguard Properties owns the list.

The post office Historic Nob Hill Home with ‘Spectacular’ San Francisco Views Asks $ 17 Million appeared first on Real estate news and information | realtor.com®.


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The Black House reopens with reflections on the past and a look to the future https://deepwood.net/the-black-house-reopens-with-reflections-on-the-past-and-a-look-to-the-future/ https://deepwood.net/the-black-house-reopens-with-reflections-on-the-past-and-a-look-to-the-future/#respond Fri, 15 Oct 2021 17:08:17 +0000 https://deepwood.net/the-black-house-reopens-with-reflections-on-the-past-and-a-look-to-the-future/ After a major renovation over the past two years, Northwestern’s historic Black House will be rededicated today, October 15, with a ribbon cut and grand reopening. Events are scheduled during Reunion and Reunion weekend so that the college community can come together to celebrate the past, present and future of the Black House and its […]]]>

After a major renovation over the past two years, Northwestern’s historic Black House will be rededicated today, October 15, with a ribbon cut and grand reopening.

Events are scheduled during Reunion and Reunion weekend so that the college community can come together to celebrate the past, present and future of the Black House and its function as a critical space for the Black Connection on the campus.

“We are delighted to welcome our dedicated Black students and alumni back to this important and vitally important location on campus,” said Julie Payne-Kirchmeier, Vice President of Student Affairs. “The hard work and care that so many of our students, faculty, staff and alumni put into this project can be felt throughout the space, and it shows how much the Black House is revered by so many members. of our community. “

The dedication program, which begins at 3:30 p.m. at 1914 Sheridan Road in Evanston, kicks off a series of events throughout the weekend which honor Northwestern’s black alumni, as well as students, faculty and staff, and their long history of advocacy and activism.

“Many years of preparation”

“This moment has been in the works for many years,” said Lesley-Ann Brown-Henderson, assistant vice president for inclusion and chief of staff in the Student Affairs Division. “Over the past five years, we have worked diligently to center the voices of Black students in every phase of this project while engaging with Black alumni, faculty and staff, and together we have made it happen. completion of the project. There was a lot of intentionality in every aspect of this project, which was overseen by the Black House Renovation Steering Committee.

In addition, three sub-committees were formed: the Black House Policy Committee, the Black House Curating the Space Committee and the Black House Reopening Committee.

“The beauty, thoughtfulness and care that is evident in the home’s design choices, operations, storytelling and aesthetics is the culmination of the diligent work of many,” added Brown-Henderson.

The renovation of the Black House is one of Northwestern’s commitments to racial and social justice as listed in a message from university leaders to the community in June 2020.

“A place that belongs to us”

Black students fought for the creation of the Black House in 1968 during Bursar’s Office Takeover, a protest that transformed the black experience and history of the Northwestern. The occupation by more than 100 students and allies from the Northwest lasted 38 hours, ending in a negotiated resolution in which the administration responded to a list of eight student requests.

One of those requests was for a social space dedicated to black students. The students wrote: “We demand a Black Student Union, a place to be used for social and recreational activities. Black students have nothing to do in Northwestern. We need a place where we can feel free to come and go as we please.

“The Black House served as a safe haven for many students during their time at Northwestern,” said Charla Wilson, University archivist for the Black Experience. “Historically, this is a place that many depended on to connect with the community, participate in cultural programs, or even just have a sympathetic and supportive ear.

‘Be part of the mural heritage’

Visitors to the Black House will see a new mural created by artist and alumnus Dwight White (’16, ’17 MS). A graduate in sociology and communications – and former Wildcat football player – White spent time at the Black House as a student and leader of the For Members Only group.

The renovated facility, which is operated and maintained by Multicultural Student Affairs, has a new floor plan, new furnishings and new finishes. With a priority on accessibility – there is an elevator as well as a gender-neutral washroom – the overriding objective was to create a new space welcoming to all and true to the original sense of character and community of the Black House.

The Black House Renovation Steering Committee, led by Payne-Kirchmeier and Brown-Henderson, guided the renovation from the initial feasibility study conducted by Black-owned architectural firm Moody Nolan to the design phase and through to completion. The construction company, GMA Construction Group, is owned and operated by Northwestern Black alumnus Cornelius Griggs (‘14).

“May this historic renovation be a symbol of our unwavering commitment and collective action to make Northwestern a fairer and more inclusive campus for our black students and certainly for all marginalized students,” said Brown-Henderson.


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Philly funeral homes and mosques hit historic gun violence crisis https://deepwood.net/philly-funeral-homes-and-mosques-hit-historic-gun-violence-crisis/ https://deepwood.net/philly-funeral-homes-and-mosques-hit-historic-gun-violence-crisis/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 10:03:44 +0000 https://deepwood.net/philly-funeral-homes-and-mosques-hit-historic-gun-violence-crisis/ West Philadelphia funeral director Michael Forrest can understand. That’s why he tries his best to leave his job at the office. At the end of each day, he comes home, looks at his children’s faces, and resets himself. “I would have PTSD. I couldn’t do it, ”Forrest said in a recent interview at his tidy […]]]>

West Philadelphia funeral director Michael Forrest can understand. That’s why he tries his best to leave his job at the office.

At the end of each day, he comes home, looks at his children’s faces, and resets himself.

“I would have PTSD. I couldn’t do it, ”Forrest said in a recent interview at his tidy business, Forrest Walker Funeral Home in West Philadelphia.

The work is still taking its toll.

Unlike many of his counterparts, Forrest controls every step of the business. He said everyone was more trying when working with a family that has lost a loved one to violence.

“I’m not necessarily blamed for it, but sometimes I’m the punching bag because I’m the one they can go after because I’m sitting there. I am an easy target, ”he said.

Forrest takes care of all the embalming. The process brings him face to face with every gunshot victim who walks through the doors of his Cobbs Creek funeral home.

And it is not a short process. Embalming a person killed by a gunshot can take up to five hours, more than double what it typically takes to preserve a person who died of natural causes.

“You can have multiple gunshot wounds and you have to sew those holes. You have the exam the medical examiner does, regardless of any cuts he may have. And you have to bring these people together and make them presentable – like it’s never happened, ”Forrest said.

Michael Forrest is the director and owner of Forrest-Walker Funeral Home in West Philadelphia. (Kimberly Paynter / WHYY)

Organizing more funerals for the gunshot victims also made his business more dangerous.

Even before the current city-wide crisis, Forrest said it was not unusual for the perpetrator of a shootout or a member of a rival street group to poke their head in a funeral service. . And he said there is always the possibility of someone showing up in a church or cemetery to fire a few shots, usually from a moving car.

“Some want revenge, some want to make a point, some want to scare the family,” Forrest said.

When it happened last year, Forrest wanted to run.

“I don’t want to get stuck in someone else’s beef, for lack of a better term, and just become a statistic because I was in the wrong place at the wrong time,” he said.

He is also concerned that his staff will be injured.


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Historic locomotives on the return trip from Snoqualmie to Nevada https://deepwood.net/historic-locomotives-on-the-return-trip-from-snoqualmie-to-nevada/ https://deepwood.net/historic-locomotives-on-the-return-trip-from-snoqualmie-to-nevada/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 01:24:09 +0000 https://deepwood.net/historic-locomotives-on-the-return-trip-from-snoqualmie-to-nevada/ RENO, Nevada – Two historic locomotives that were part of the pioneering switch from steam trains to diesel-electric trains in the mid-1900s are returning home to a rail yard in northeastern Nevada. Built in 1951, Locomotive 201 is the last surviving of 38 experimental models manufactured by the American Locomotive Company. It’s scheduled to be […]]]>

RENO, Nevada – Two historic locomotives that were part of the pioneering switch from steam trains to diesel-electric trains in the mid-1900s are returning home to a rail yard in northeastern Nevada.

Built in 1951, Locomotive 201 is the last surviving of 38 experimental models manufactured by the American Locomotive Company. It’s scheduled to be loaded onto a truck Nov. 2 at the Northwest Railway Museum in Snoqualmie, where it still occasionally pulls excursion trains on the museum’s Snoqualmie Valley Railroad.

The truck carrying the 286,000-pound engine will take four or five days at a top speed of about 35 mph to make the 900-mile trip to Ely at the Nevada Northern Railway Museum near the Nevada-Utah line, the chairman of the Mark Bassett Railway. .

Details are still pending for Delta, Utah’s return of No. 401, General Motors’ first special-service model built in 1952 in its Electro-Motive division.

It was the only one painted in the “Desert War Bonnet” scheme, a cream, scarlet, and black design that remains on today. She became the “last Empress of Ely”.

“These two are one of a kind locomotives,” Bassett said. “The two have a story to tell and they are both tied to the early days of the Northern Nevada Railroad diesel engine. “

The railroad purchased both in the 1950s and used them primarily to haul copper to smelters in Nevada, Idaho, and Utah until the railroad closed in 1983. The museum plans to restore them and put them back into service for guided tours.

The diesel-electric locomotive offered many advantages over its steam-powered counterpart, Bassett said. It required less maintenance, used less fuel, and could be operated with a small crew. It also did not require expensive support structures like rotundas, cooling towers and water tanks.

After World War II, the “dieselization” of American railways was rapid. Of the 21,000 new locomotives purchased between 1945 and 1955, 95% were diesel-electric locomotives, the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan, says on its website.

Bassett, the director of the Ely Museum, is leading the fundraising effort of $ 350,000 to cover the cost of returning the locomotives and restoring them. He lives in Ely across from the depot in the CEO’s house which was built by the railroad in 1923.

“It’s frankly unheard of to bring them home around the same time to their house where they worked from the 1950s to the 1980s,” Basset said in a telephone interview. “Any other locomotive (this old one) would have been cut up and scrapped and made into razor blades.”

The number 401 was almost lost in a fire in a rotunda in Cobre, north of West Wendover, near the Utah Line in 1952.

Railroad Superintendent Harold M. Peterson wrote in his autobiography that he was awakened by a phone call around 1 a.m. from a South Pacific Railroad dispatcher who said the engine was still at inside the rotunda as the fire raged. It was about three hours later that he finally learned that an engineer, Jumbo Labate, had come to the rescue.

The dispatcher “reported that the locomotive had been safely removed from the fire, but the rotunda was completely gone. Jumbo Labate had opened the large rotunda doors, stood up in the engine, started it, and backed out of the rotunda before the roof collapsed, ”Peterson wrote.


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The historic Bishops Lane cottage will soon be moved to make way for a new home https://deepwood.net/the-historic-bishops-lane-cottage-will-soon-be-moved-to-make-way-for-a-new-home/ https://deepwood.net/the-historic-bishops-lane-cottage-will-soon-be-moved-to-make-way-for-a-new-home/#respond Mon, 11 Oct 2021 23:06:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/the-historic-bishops-lane-cottage-will-soon-be-moved-to-make-way-for-a-new-home/ Over the next few months, a historically designated house will be moved from Bishops Lane in La Jolla to an adjacent property to make way for a new residential development. According to the San Diego Department of Developmental Services, an application was filed Aug. 26 for a coastal development permit to build a 3,603 square […]]]>

Over the next few months, a historically designated house will be moved from Bishops Lane in La Jolla to an adjacent property to make way for a new residential development.

According to the San Diego Department of Developmental Services, an application was filed Aug. 26 for a coastal development permit to build a 3,603 square foot single-family residence with lower-level accessory housing at 7762 Bishops Lane in the village.

The request will be submitted to local planning groups before construction begins. In the meantime, the Lillian Lentell chalet from 1913 will be moved to 817 Silverado Street. The house was designated historic in 2012 as a resource illustrating the development of the first beach chalets in La Jolla, with a period of significance from 1913 to 15.

“We are moving the 30 foot cottage to the adjacent property in the lane closer to Silverado,” said owner and applicant Taal Safdie of Safdie Rabines Architecture. “It will be more visible from the street than today.”

She said the move “should be soon, in the next couple of months, depending on how long it takes for everything to line up properly,” and that trenches would be made around the property in preparation for the move.

The Lillian Lentell chalet will be moved from 7762 Bishops Lane to 817 Silverado St.

(Bing Maps / La Jolla Light)

Safdie said the future development will be in a “modern chalet” style with parking on the property which will be “completely separate from the front chalet”.

The site where the chalet is moved has another chalet. According to a report from the city associated with the project, “The relocation of the chalet would create a complex of two coastal beach chalets, visually connected by a two-car garage with studio above, into a continuous beach chalet complex facing Bishops Lane, while overlooking Silverado Street. An external staircase will separate the chalet from the proposed garage and the addition of a studio between them.

The San Diego Historic Resources Board voted at its November 19 meeting to support the relocation of the Lintell House with mitigation measures to preserve it.

At the time, Courtney Coyle, a board member and resident of La Jolla, feared the new development would overshadow the old chalet.

“There are a number of little chalets in La Jolla… that have been built, and by the time they are completed it looks like a modern mansion and it loses its scale and the feel of these structures,” he said. she declared. “I hope for the best, but I have seen structures disappear … in the new construction, and I hope that doesn’t happen here.”

A construction schedule has not yet been established as the city has to provide comments on the request, which could be revised accordingly. ??


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Montana history rekindled with historic appointments | national news https://deepwood.net/montana-history-rekindled-with-historic-appointments-national-news/ https://deepwood.net/montana-history-rekindled-with-historic-appointments-national-news/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 15:09:37 +0000 https://deepwood.net/montana-history-rekindled-with-historic-appointments-national-news/ A classically constructed cabin of tragic fate, as well as a relic of early air travel, could become the last pieces of western Montana included in the National Register of Historic Places. The Kruse Hut along the North Fork of the Flathead River, the St. Regis Airway Beacon, and the Hall Pavilion near Helena have […]]]>

A classically constructed cabin of tragic fate, as well as a relic of early air travel, could become the last pieces of western Montana included in the National Register of Historic Places.

The Kruse Hut along the North Fork of the Flathead River, the St. Regis Airway Beacon, and the Hall Pavilion near Helena have been identified by the Montana Historical Preservation Office for recognition.

“These nominations show the variety of property types eligible for the National Register,” said Pete Brown, program manager for the State Historic Preservation Office. “Granted, an airway beacon is not something most people think of as a historic site, but it is a utility that facilitated express transportation in the age of trains, long before interstate highways. “

The red and white checkered beacon sits on the mountainside overlooking the Clark Fork River. Its original goal in 1935 was to shine a lighthouse so that planes flying at night could find their way from Minneapolis to Seattle. Technological improvements kept it in service until 2017.

While not exactly a tourist attraction, Montana Historical Society spokeswoman Eve Byron said it has some fascinating features.

“There is a little cabin where the maintenance workers would seek shelter,” Byron said. “Window coverings not only protect windows, but collapse into a table.”

The Billy Kruse Hut near Polebridge also displays neat architecture in its hand-peeled larch log walls set on gables. But his legend of love gone awry anchored him in North Fork lore, historian says John fraley.

“Larry Wilson, the unofficial ‘Mayor of Polebridge’ gave me the early parts of the story,” said Fraley, who published it in his 2017 book “Rangers Trappers and Trailblazers”. “He told all the different versions of how the shooting happened. Then I looked at newspaper reports and death certificates. I even tried unsuccessfully to find Kruse’s grave.

The story begins with Danish emigrant Wilhelm “Billy” Kruse building his 16ft by 18ft cabin in 1925. A lonely bachelor, Kruse began to correspond with a New York woman named Mary Powell. In 1931, she agreed to come and live with Kruse as a “housekeeper / companion” with one of her daughters.

But Kruse often went to work as a shepherd for the US Forest Service. During an extended trip, the Powell women moved to another house owned by neighbor Gustav “Ed” Peterson. It infuriated Kruse when he found out, and he confronted Peterson.

Fraley recalled that after a night of drinking and threats, Kruse shot Peterson but missed him. Peterson retaliated and fatally injured Kruse. The fight took place in the dead of winter and a coroner’s jury had to stand in Polebridge because North Fork was too snowy to make it to a courthouse.

“Most of the jurors were involved in the tragedy,” Fraley said. “They found out that Peterson shot in self-defense, so it was justifiable homicide. Of course, Billy was not available for his side of the testimony.

Mary Powell became a legendary smuggler known as “Madame Queen” throughout the North Fork. The private cabin remains a popular stopover on historical tours of the region.

The third contender, the Hall Bungalow from 1916, reflects its history as a private summer residence and ranch, according to Byron. Two of the original owners, James Hall and John Scoville, lived in Chicago, while the third principal, Harold “Sol” Hepner, was an attorney for Helena who served in the state legislature and as an attorney for the United States. Lewis and Clark County. William Martin, a Chicago resident, was on the Chicago Board of Trade, as were Scoville and Hall. Together, the four men were part of the Hall Ranch Company.

Originally built as a summer house, the house features tongue-and-groove ceilings and floors, a river stone fireplace, and a square piano delivered to Boulder Valley in the early 1800s. Ranch Company sold the property to John “Jack” Lowrie Patten for $ 150,000 in 1919, it was believed to be the largest real estate transaction ever in the county. He renamed the ranch “Lazy T Ranch” and hired up to 22 men to hay and harvest grain.

“If the review board finds these places worthy, it goes to the National Park Service, which is the keeper of the National Register of Historic Places,” Byron said. “It doesn’t place any burden on homeowners – it doesn’t restrict improvements or maintenance. It’s just recognition that this is a special place.


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