Historic Places – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ Sat, 03 Jul 2021 01:45:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 http://deepwood.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2-150x150.png Historic Places – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ 32 32 State marks $ 2.75 million to help revitalize Hunt Branch Library in Fullerton, ‘start-up’ programs – Orange County Register http://deepwood.net/state-marks-2-75-million-to-help-revitalize-hunt-branch-library-in-fullerton-start-up-programs-orange-county-register/ http://deepwood.net/state-marks-2-75-million-to-help-revitalize-hunt-branch-library-in-fullerton-start-up-programs-orange-county-register/#respond Sat, 03 Jul 2021 00:45:57 +0000 http://deepwood.net/state-marks-2-75-million-to-help-revitalize-hunt-branch-library-in-fullerton-start-up-programs-orange-county-register/ More than $ 2 million in funding is earmarked in the state’s annual budget to revitalize the Hunt Branch Library in Fullerton, which city officials plan to reopen as an arts and culture center after years of closure to the public. The nearly 60-year-old building, recognizable by its flat roof and glass facade, was designed […]]]>

More than $ 2 million in funding is earmarked in the state’s annual budget to revitalize the Hunt Branch Library in Fullerton, which city officials plan to reopen as an arts and culture center after years of closure to the public.

The nearly 60-year-old building, recognizable by its flat roof and glass facade, was designed by architect William Pereira and built with a $ 500,000 donation from the Hunt Foods and Industries Foundation. Designated a local monument in 2018, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2019.

MP Sharon Quirk-Silva, a former Fullerton City Council member who lobbied for state money with Senator Josh Newman, said the city’s 2013 closure of the library to the public “was , I think, devastating for this community, this kind of to have used it quietly.

The library “is sort of that hidden gem,” Quirk-Silva said, “not only with its well-known architecture, but it’s in a very quiet and gated area that few people know even in Fullerton, which is gone. of its beauty.

Last year, city council selected a joint proposal from two nonprofits, Heritage Future and Arts Orange County, to transform the library into an arts and culture center to host community events, art workshops and literacy programs. Heritage Future offered to bring live podcasts, programs to promote emerging authors, and educational projects in partnership with local universities to Hunt.

Judy Booth, director of the Fullerton Library, said Arts Orange County has conducted public inquiries and contacted the community to assess the types of programs people would like to see in the space. For its eventual reopening, the city’s public library system would provide library services, she said.

A Newport Beach architectural firm, Thirtieth Street Architects, signed a contract with the city in March to plan the major renovations needed at the site, including roof replacement, structural repairs, and mechanical, electrical and plumbing work. . A state grant of $ 2.5 million awarded in 2019 will be earmarked for the improvements, although a staff report written in March notes that “estimates show the costs to fully meet all of the building’s needs and of the surrounding site will exceed this amount “.

“The additional $ 2.75 million in funding will continue to improve the outdoor site and landscaping, some to be used to start programming,” Booth said in an email.

Construction has not yet started on the building, she said, as city officials await cost estimates from the architectural firm.

A hub for after-school programs, the hunt was a place Quirk-Silva took her children for story time when they were young, she said. It was a focal point for schools and families on the west side of the city, which suffered a loss when the space was closed for lack of funding, she said.

“It has always been important for me to replace the civil service where we take it away,” Quirk-Silva said. “And when the city closed it, it looked like a vacant building. And yet the capacity there is enormous.


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8 fantastic places in President Truman’s independence http://deepwood.net/8-fantastic-places-in-president-trumans-independence/ http://deepwood.net/8-fantastic-places-in-president-trumans-independence/#respond Thu, 01 Jul 2021 22:42:35 +0000 http://deepwood.net/8-fantastic-places-in-president-trumans-independence/ Independence, Missouri, located just east of Kansas City, is a charming place full of things to do, see and experience. It also happens to be the hometown of former US President Harry S. Truman. Many history buffs flock here to trace President Truman’s footsteps. It was there that he grew up, first practiced law and […]]]>

Independence, Missouri, located just east of Kansas City, is a charming place full of things to do, see and experience. It also happens to be the hometown of former US President Harry S. Truman. Many history buffs flock here to trace President Truman’s footsteps. It was there that he grew up, first practiced law and entered politics. After his time in the White House, Truman chose to return to the place he had always called his home.

Here are eight must-see places where you, too, can connect with the life and heritage of the 33rd President.

Truman Library Institute

1. Discover the library and the museum

Perhaps the best place to start your Truman adventure is the Presidential Harry S. Truman Library and Museum. Currently undergoing a $ 30 million renovation, the resort is slated to open this summer, and the timing couldn’t be more perfect: it’s the 75th anniversary of when Truman became the country’s 33rd president.

The library stores Truman’s personal documents and archives, and various exhibits and artifacts related to his life and presidency can be found in the museum. The yard here is also the final resting place of Truman, who opted for private service in Missouri instead of a state funeral in Washington, DC His wife, Bess; their daughter Marguerite; and their son-in-law, Clifton Daniel, are also buried here. This is a testament to the importance of independence for the entire Truman family.

Truman’s presidency has been marked by difficult decisions and turbulent times. The son of a Missouri farmer, he rose to the country’s highest office after the death of President Roosevelt in April 1945, and his tenure included the end of World War II, the start of the Cold War, and the start of the war in Korea. . You’ll learn more about these tough calls – and maybe enjoy them all the more – after a visit to the library and museum.

Independence, MO in the fall at Harry S. Truman
VisitIndependence.com

2. Stop at historic sites

The roots of the Truman family were deeply rooted in independence. The magnificent Victorian house where Harry and Bess lived was built by his grandfather in 1867.

Today the house is part of the Harry S Truman National Historic Site. At the Harry S. Truman Home, you’ll get a feel for the life of the couple, who moved into the family home after their honeymoon. They hugged their extended family, sharing the house with Bess’s mother and grandmother. Two of Bess’s brothers also built small houses on the land.

Truman has returned to the Delaware Street family home from time to time during his presidency, calling it the Summer White House. After the Trumans left Washington for good, this was the place they had chosen to call home again, and for good. They stepped away from the spotlight and opted for simplicity instead.

This desire is reflected in the house. Although large, it offers a very personal look at the life they lived here. While the Trumans sometimes hosted guests in their homes, they were intensely private. After Bess’s death, the house was donated to the National Park Service, and rangers continue to protect the privacy of the family to this day: visitors are not allowed on the second floor of the residence.

The historic site also includes the Noland House just across the street, where Truman’s aunt and uncle lived. One day, while visiting them, they asked Harry to bring a cake plate home across the street. There he reconnected with Bess, and their courtship began. Today, the house explains the deep bond – and love of the house – that Harry and Bess shared.

Both places – so important and central in Harry S. Truman’s life – are open for free tours, but you must have a ticket. They are available at the downtown visitor center.

3. Visit to the Truman courtroom

Truman’s path to the presidency was a bit unorthodox. He was certainly not prepared from the start for a life in the public service. His family couldn’t afford to send him to college, so instead he took on various other jobs, until he followed in his father’s footsteps and cultivated for a while. Upon his return from World War I, he opened – and then closed – a clothing store, and he didn’t become a county judge until his late thirties.

The historic courthouse where Truman presided as a judge now houses the Jackson County Historical Society. The group gives tours of Truman’s office and courtroom. While you’re there, don’t forget to take a selfie with the man himself – a bronze statue of Truman is located on the east side of the courthouse.

Family outside Independence, MO
VisitIndependence.com

It is difficult to take more than a few steps towards independence without stumbling upon a Truman landmark. It turns out that it’s easy to combine a good workout with lesser-known Truman locations and spots. It’s also kind of a tribute, as he was known to keep in shape by walking around the city before breakfast. He always kept a steady pace, cane in hand.

Keep an eye out for large navy blue signs depicting a silhouette of President Truman near the city center; these indicate areas of interest for those who wish to see additional places or landmarks related to him or his family and friends. There is also a self-guided walking tour that includes a total of 44 stops along a 2.7 mile route. It’s a great activity for history buffs; download the map or pick one up at the Visitor Center.

Truman depot in Independence, MO
VisitIndependence.com

5. See where the whistle ended

Truman’s famous Whistlestop campaign took place during the summer and fall of 1948 as he was locked in a battle for re-election. He decided to speak directly to the American people, and to as many of them as he could. The resulting 31,000 mile journey was marked by clear speeches and numerous election campaigns. The last step ? Independence, of course!

Today, the historic Missouri Pacific Depot where Truman’s country trips ended is perhaps better known as the Truman Depot. It is the same place where more than 8,000 people came to welcome Truman to his home years later, in January 1953, after he had left the White House.

Built in 1913, the Truman Depot currently serves as an Amtrak station and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.

6. See the spiritual house of the Trumans

Harry S. Truman had known Bess Wallace for most of his life, having first met the blonde-haired, blue-eyed girl in the Sunday School classroom when they were young children. Years later, in 1919, the couple married at Trinity Episcopal Church in downtown Independence, which was first established during the city’s pioneer days in 1844 and was the ‘Bess’s original church. The current building was constructed in 1881 and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

Trinity truly served as a spiritual center for the Truman family: their daughter, Margaret, married here in 1956; President Truman laid the cornerstone of the Trinity Communion Hall in 1959; and Bess Truman’s funeral was held at the church in 1982.

family in KC Royals shirts in Independence, MO
VisitIndependence.com

7. Grab a treat from Clinton’s soda fountain

If, following in Truman’s footsteps, you’re feeling up for a sweet treat, stop by the Clinton Soda Fountain in historic Independence Square. As a teenager, Truman worked at a drugstore and soda fountain right there. It also housed a shoe and jewelry store, but returned to its old candy store in 1988 when Clinton opened.

The Old Fashioned Soda Fountain offers sundaes, ice cream floats, old fashioned phosphates and even edible cookie dough as well as soups and sandwiches. This place feels like a blast from the past, and it’s not too hard to imagine a young Harry S. Truman wiping tables, making ice cream, and serving customers. It’s a great place to sit, sip and relax in the historic heart of Independence!

Finally, if you find that you need a bit of retail work as you learn about Truman’s deep legacy in Independence, head over to Wild About Harry. Named in tribute to the 33rd President, the boutique in the square offers gifts for men, including luxury toiletries, office decor, games and gadgets. This is the perfect place to choose a gift worthy of a president, father, or any other special man in your life!

Pro tip

You could easily spend an entire weekend seeing and experiencing all things Truman in his hometown. Independence offers a wide range of accommodation for all needs and budgets. From historic downtown inns to more traditional hotel chains, the city has a great list here. For more on all the great things to see, do and experience in Independence, check out the city’s online visitor guide and get inspired by all of our Independence content here.

Visit Missouri Tourism

Missouri Tourism Division


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Historic Northwest heat wave may have claimed hundreds of lives http://deepwood.net/historic-northwest-heat-wave-may-have-claimed-hundreds-of-lives/ http://deepwood.net/historic-northwest-heat-wave-may-have-claimed-hundreds-of-lives/#respond Thu, 01 Jul 2021 04:11:52 +0000 http://deepwood.net/historic-northwest-heat-wave-may-have-claimed-hundreds-of-lives/ SALEM, Oregon – Hundreds of deaths in Canada, Oregon and Washington could have been caused by the historic heat wave that ravaged the Pacific Northwest and shattered all-time temperature records in generally temperate cities . Oregon health officials said Wednesday evening that more than 60 deaths were linked to the heat, with the state’s largest […]]]>

SALEM, Oregon – Hundreds of deaths in Canada, Oregon and Washington could have been caused by the historic heat wave that ravaged the Pacific Northwest and shattered all-time temperature records in generally temperate cities .

British Columbia Chief Coroner Lisa Lapointe said her office received reports of at least 486 “sudden and unexpected deaths” between Friday and 1 p.m. Wednesday. Normally, she said about 165 people would die in the province over a five-day period.

“While it is too early to say for sure how many of these deaths are heat-related, it is likely that the significant increase in reported deaths is attributable to extreme weather conditions,” LaPointe said in a statement.

Like Seattle, many homes in Vancouver, British Columbia do not have air conditioning.

“Vancouver has never experienced heat like this and unfortunately dozens of people are dying of it,” said Vancouver Police Sgt. Steve Addison said in a statement.

Authorities in Washington state had linked more than 20 deaths to the heat, but that number was likely to rise.

The heat wave was caused by what meteorologists described as a dome of high pressure over the northwest and made worse by man-made climate change, making these extreme weather events more likely and more intense. . Seattle, Portland and many other cities have broken all-time heat records, with temperatures in some places reaching above 115 degrees Fahrenheit (46 Celsius).

As temperatures cooled significantly in western Washington, Oregon and British Columbia on Wednesday, interior regions were still experiencing triple-digit temperatures as the weather system was moving east into the Intermountain West and Plains.

Environment Canada issued heat warnings for southern Alberta and Saskatchewan on Wednesday. Heat warnings were also in place for parts of Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Montana.

In Alberta, “a prolonged, dangerous and historic heat wave will persist this week,” Environment Canada said.

Very high temperatures or humidity conditions posed a high risk of heat stroke or heat exhaustion.

In a statement, the Multnomah County, Oregon, medical examiner blamed 45 heat deaths on hyperthermia, an abnormally high body temperature caused by the body’s inability to manage heat. The victims were between 44 and 97 years old.

The county that includes Portland said that between 2017 and 2019, there were just 12 hyperthermia deaths in all of Oregon.

“This was a real health crisis that highlighted just how deadly an extreme heat wave can be, especially for otherwise vulnerable people,” said Dr Jennifer Vines, county health official, in a statement.

The King County Medical Examiner’s Office, which covers an area including Seattle, said at least 13 people have died from the heat. The victims were between 61 and 97 years old.

In eastern Washington, Spokane firefighters on Wednesday found two people who died in an apartment building suffering from symptoms of heat stress, KREM television reported.

The heat has led a utility company in Spokane to impose gradual blackouts due to strain on the power grid. Avista Utilities says it tries to limit outages to one hour per customer.

Renee Swecker, 66, of Clayton, Wash., Visited a fountain in downtown Spokane’s Riverfront Park on Wednesday with her grandchildren, saying they “went wherever there was water. ‘water”.

“I pray for rain every day,” Swecker said.

———

Morris reported from Vancouver, British Columbia. Associated Press writer Nicholas K. Geranios contributed from Spokane, Washington.


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County replaces windows of historic courthouse http://deepwood.net/county-replaces-windows-of-historic-courthouse/ http://deepwood.net/county-replaces-windows-of-historic-courthouse/#respond Thu, 01 Jul 2021 04:05:25 +0000 http://deepwood.net/county-replaces-windows-of-historic-courthouse/ Crews are working Wednesday morning to replace aging third floor and dome windows at the Chaves County Courthouse on North Main Street. The work is the first phase of a larger window replacement project. (Photo by Lisa Dunlap) Copyright © 2021 Roswell Daily Record Contractors in Chaves County are expected to work another week on […]]]>

Crews are working Wednesday morning to replace aging third floor and dome windows at the Chaves County Courthouse on North Main Street. The work is the first phase of a larger window replacement project. (Photo by Lisa Dunlap)

Copyright © 2021 Roswell Daily Record

Contractors in Chaves County are expected to work another week on the first phase of replacing the historic 110-year-old windows in the downtown courthouse.

Construction crews began replacing the older – and, in some cases, leaking – windows on the third floor and dome about two weeks ago, with the elevator being used to reach the higher windows seen these last days.

“So far, not all the rains have been too much of a problem,” said Mac Rogers, director of utilities for Chaves County. “The contractors did a good job making sure they took care of it and re-filling the windows as needed to help protect our building. “

He said the works and the elevator are not expected to impact AlienFest activities, as these are coordinated by MainStreet Roswell alongside the city-sponsored UFO festival. AlienFest activities are scheduled to begin today and continue through Saturday on the courthouse lawn.

The county received state funding for the first phase, and the Chaves County Board of Commissioners awarded the $ 285,277 contract in October to Phoenix Restoration and Construction Ltd. from Texas. The project architect is John Layman of NCA Architects based in Albuquerque.

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The replacement of the first and second story windows will likely take place in 2022. This project is expected to cost around $ 1 million, with the county receiving $ 600,000 in capital spending from the 2021 New Mexico Legislature and Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham. for the works. .

“It’s hard to program because all of these windows are in the judges’ offices,” he said. “But I think we would be looking to start this in the winter of 2022.”

Rogers said the basement windows have already been replaced.

The county has been planning the restoration project for about eight years. The Chaves County Courthouse and the original prison were designated a State Historic Site in 1984 and a National Historic Site in 1989, so any work on the historic structures of the building must be done in accordance with the standards of the New Mexico State Preservation Division.

“In dealing with the (Preservation Division), the windows had to meet their architectural standards, so they were specially constructed on the West Coast and shipped to the site,” Rogers said.

He said the frames were built by Sierra Pacific Windows. The windows themselves are being modernized, he said, to meet current energy efficiency codes.

According to documents submitted in 1987 for the National Register of Historic Places and the National Historic Monuments Program, the courthouse was built in 1911 for $ 164,000. A prison that was built as a separate structure but attached by later additions was also part of the historic designations.

The national program approved the historic designation because of the architectural significance of the building. The documents state that “the 1911 Chaves County Courthouse is architecturally significant as a rare example of Georgian Revival (Federal) style in New Mexico and for its association with architects (Isaac Hamilton) Rapp and (William Morris) Rapp.

Lisa Dunlap can be reached at 575-622-7710, ext. 351, or at reporter02@rdrnews.com.


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Finding a Better Place for the Cell Phone Tower Letters to the Editor http://deepwood.net/finding-a-better-place-for-the-cell-phone-tower-letters-to-the-editor/ http://deepwood.net/finding-a-better-place-for-the-cell-phone-tower-letters-to-the-editor/#respond Thu, 01 Jul 2021 03:00:00 +0000 http://deepwood.net/finding-a-better-place-for-the-cell-phone-tower-letters-to-the-editor/ On the cell tower proposed by AT&T in the play Cerrillos (“A Difficult Call to Cerrollis”, June 24), I will address two important omissions. The proposed location is within the boundaries of the Los Cerrillos Historic Mining District (New Mexico State’s National Register of Historic Places and Cultural Property since 1973). The placement of the […]]]>

On the cell tower proposed by AT&T in the play Cerrillos (“A Difficult Call to Cerrollis”, June 24), I will address two important omissions. The proposed location is within the boundaries of the Los Cerrillos Historic Mining District (New Mexico State’s National Register of Historic Places and Cultural Property since 1973). The placement of the tower there would degrade the unique historical value of this rural village and be permanently visible everywhere, as well as from the trails of Cerrillos Hills State Park and the distinctive mining landscape.

Second, the tower would negatively impact the view of the Turquoise Trail National Scenic Route (NM 14), degrading the nationally valued scenic quality of the region. The location of the tower is permanent; the destruction of the incomparable visual and historical quality of this place would be tragic. Cerrillos and the residents of the area are in dire need of cellphone access. Don’t put the tower there. Finding a suitable tour site is a challenge. But pushing through a bad solution is not the answer. Move it.

Inaction and procrastination characterize many politicians. These attributes are evident after reading Mayor Alan Webber’s My View (“A Way Forward on the Obelisk,” June 27). Webber said he didn’t make the rash decision to do nothing when the Plaza disruption began; instead, he consulted many people before deciding to do nothing. Don’t worry, a substantive discussion of the Obelisk issue and a rewarding solution will be found just before the election.

Certainly, the newspaper has the right to support a mobile phone tower in Cerrillos (“The mobile phone tower is a necessity,” Our View, June 28); but editors, you are not the subject matter experts. Only professional engineers licensed in New Mexico can certify that a proposed tower is necessary, conveniently located, and that its safety risks have been mitigated. Until the builder provides PE certified documents, Cerrillos must protect its citizens and ban the installation of the tower.

The National Fire Protection Association recognizes five hazards associated with electrical equipment (including cell towers): electrical contact, thermal effects, fault current, overcurrent, and overvoltage. When designing the tower, to ensure that it will not endanger life, health or property, a state-approved electrical PE must assess each hazard and certify that it has been mitigated. A state licensed professional structural engineer must also certify the structural integrity of the tower. Only then can a building permit be issued. To see cell phone towers that have collapsed and / or caught on fire, visit www.OurWeb.tech/fires-and-collapses.

Some of the hardest working people in our state live in Alamogordo, including many brave men and women who serve our country’s military at Holloman Air Force Base. Our White Sands National Park brought in $ 26 million in economic benefits to our state last year alone, and the Tularosa Basin is essential for agriculture and ranching.

Sam Pick suddenly standing next to his comment, “If you’ve only got one year to live, move to Alamogordo, and it would seem like an eternity,” shows that he does not respect the citizens of our state or l our country’s army (“Hmmm, Wasn’t Wrong About Alamogordo”, Letters to the Editor, June 27). Degrading other New Mexicans based on where they live shows why elitists like Mr. Pick do not belong to positions of power. Alamogordo works hard for New Mexico, and I’m proud to call him home.


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Trump CFO Allen Weisselberg has been helping his boss lie for years http://deepwood.net/trump-cfo-allen-weisselberg-has-been-helping-his-boss-lie-for-years/ http://deepwood.net/trump-cfo-allen-weisselberg-has-been-helping-his-boss-lie-for-years/#respond Thu, 01 Jul 2021 01:49:04 +0000 http://deepwood.net/trump-cfo-allen-weisselberg-has-been-helping-his-boss-lie-for-years/ Trump Organization CFO Allen Weisselberg watches then Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaking at a press conference at Trump Tower in Manhattan in 2016. REUTERS / Carlo Allegri – RC2BAO96JT05 REUTERS There is probably no one who knows the truth about Trump’s finances better than Allen Weisselberg. Not that he always said it. IIt is […]]]>

There is probably no one who knows the truth about Trump’s finances better than Allen Weisselberg. Not that he always said it.


IIt is September 2015, and Donald Trump is walking through Trump Tower, showing off his breathtaking view of the New York City skyline. In the distance is 40 Wall Street, which the real estate mogul is focusing on right now. “By the way,” he said, turning to his right arm, “do you know what the mortgage is? The mortgage pays, what, 2.5%?

“Yeah, that’s what we get,” his lieutenant dutifully replies. “It’s very low.”

Trump, three months after starting his presidential bid, waged a different campaign that day to get Forbes to get him as high as possible on the Forbes 400 list of the richest people in America. Which is why he’s so keen on bragging about something as small as his low interest rate. Regardless of the facts, it’s actually 3.665%, not 2.5%.

Trump has long been used to lying about his finances. And for years, his masquerade relied on the support of his best soldier: Allen Weisselberg, longtime CFO of the Trump Organization. For those familiar with Weisselberg’s role, it’s no surprise that the CFO is now facing an indictment for alleged financial crimes. (Weisselberg did not respond to a request for comment.)

For nearly 50 years, Weisselberg worked with Trump, looking after his money and, when times got tough, renegotiating payments. The two businessmen aren’t necessarily alike: Trump loves to be the center of attention and endless ramblings, while Weisselberg is known for going backstage and speaking succinctly. But they’ve been teaming up for a long time, including in a persistent effort to convince Forbes that Trump is richer than he really is.

Over the years, reporters have fought with Weisselberg in countless phone calls and meetings, and even over lunch at a Michelin-starred restaurant in the 1990s. But in 2015, in the midst of the race for the presidential election that would propel Trump to the White House, Weisselberg and his boss went all in, welcoming two editors and a reporter to Trump Tower for nearly two hours to rant over the assets of the Trump Organization, with little allegiance to the facts, while several recorders captured the conversation for posterity.

While Trump was lying freely and recklessly, Weisselberg was lying primarily to support his boss. “We’ll make at least $ 75 million this year,” Trump said at one point, referring to his Miami golf resort Doral. “Yes,” Weisselberg was quick to assert, even though the resort was on track to earn just $ 13.8 million, according to documents the Trump Organization subsequently submitted to local authorities.

“You know what we pay [in] interest on this mortgage? Trump asked, again referring to the golf resort. “Two percent.” No, says Weisselberg: “Less”. “What, 1.75%? Asked Ivanka Trump, whose father had urged her to apply pressure. Forbes as well as. “Yes, 1.75%,” Donald Trump said. “Okay, 1.75%,” Weisselberg confirmed. But according to Trump’s financial disclosure report, filed with federal officials, he was actually paying 1.75% more a benchmark interest rate, which then hovered around 0.5%. So, in other words, he was really paying more than 2% interest, not less.

Back to 40 Wall Street, where the lies got bolder. “It’s a 78-story building,” Trump said, referring to the 63-story building. “Fully rented. Throw a fortune. It’s gonna rock, how about $ 50 million maybe this year? He asked before answering his own question. “$ 50 million. “Yes,” Weisselberg confirmed. The building was actually only going to generate $ 11.9 million, according to a document later filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

There was also a more subtle deception. Take, for example, Weisselberg’s attempts to increase the value placed on Trump’s Mar-a-Lago club. “There was a sale — here’s the item that was in the Palm Beach Daily News“Weisselberg said, picking up a story on a property he described as 8.8 acres.” It was a combined sale of $ 116.1 million. Not our property, another property in Palm Beach. But they don’t have half of what we have on our property. Weisselberg continued, “We have about 19 acres – you do the multiplication.” He added that Trump had invested an additional $ 14 million in the ballroom, $ 4 million in waterfront cabanas and $ 700,000 in a tennis center. “Total $ 267 [million]. ”

The problem was that Trump’s property – listed on the National Register of Historic Places – couldn’t be subdivided into lots for multi-millionaires to build homes. And that meant he was actually worth around $ 100 million less than what Weisselberg was offering.

He and Trump attempted a similar stunt with Trump Tower, noting that the Crown Building across the street had recently sold for $ 1.8 billion. “It’s bigger,” Trump boasted, even though his property was actually 25% smaller. Weisselberg dismissed our own independent research on the building, insisting that Forbes evaluate it based on the megavent. “You have a great lineup across the street,” he said. “How can you say, ‘No, let’s go get 500 sources.’ How do you ignore this? This mockup for me is worth gold.

Weisselberg wasn’t the only MP to demean himself by helping his boss. Former Trump Organization executive Michael Cohen has also worked on taking stock of the numbers over the years. In testimony to Congress in 2019, Cohen admitted to helping rig Trump’s finances – and not just Forbes.

“These financial statements have been used by me for two purposes,” Cohen said. “One was discussing with the media, if it was Forbes or other magazines, to demonstrate Mr. Trump’s significant net worth. It was a function. Another was that when we later deal with the insurance companies, we provide them with these copies so that they understand that the premium – which is based, sometimes, on the individual’s ability to pay – would be reduced. Cohen also explained that the Trump Organization submitted the documents to Deutsche Bank, one of its lenders.

In a court file, the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office later suggested it was investigating allegations that the Trump Organization committed insurance and banking fraud. The big question at this point is whether an indictment will pressure Weisselberg, who has always had a more intimate role in Trump’s financial machinations than Cohen, to turn on the former president as well.


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Partnerships lead to a new future for Fort Owen http://deepwood.net/partnerships-lead-to-a-new-future-for-fort-owen/ http://deepwood.net/partnerships-lead-to-a-new-future-for-fort-owen/#respond Thu, 01 Jul 2021 01:39:46 +0000 http://deepwood.net/partnerships-lead-to-a-new-future-for-fort-owen/ STEVENSVILLE – On the hottest day of the year, people who have teamed up to restore one of Montana’s most historic places are remembered not only a legacy, but a bit of the pioneering conditions as well. Leaders from Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks, the State Parks Foundation and the Friends of Fort Owen gather […]]]>

STEVENSVILLE – On the hottest day of the year, people who have teamed up to restore one of Montana’s most historic places are remembered not only a legacy, but a bit of the pioneering conditions as well.

Leaders from Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks, the State Parks Foundation and the Friends of Fort Owen gather at the newly redesigned site north of Stevensville, marking the completion of the first phase of change.

These include a new paved access road, better parking and better signage. Everything to improve the visitor experience in the small park, but also to be a better neighbor for the surrounding Fort Owen Ranch. Owner Myla Yahraus, who bought the ranch three years ago, cooperated with the expansion, recognizing the importance of the park. FWP staff praised his thoughtfulness and inspiration.

“So that it can be managed easily. So that it can be managed in a way that a neighbor can bear some of the impacts of recreation, as well as some of that tourism and that interest,” said Randy Arnold, FWP Regional Supervisor. “But for me, it’s not over, we’ve solved it. It’s just the start of a new trajectory.”

Coby Gierke, executive director of the Montana State Parks Foundation, says the changes are a prime example of what can happen when partnerships are forged.

“We wanted to preserve what is here and protect these historic assets, Montana’s oldest permanently inhabited space. And we wanted to provide better access. So we achieved those goals and we really wanted to create a long-term sustainable solution for ourselves and the private owner next door. “

These changes will provide a buffer zone between park visitors and ranch operations.

“It feels good to be able to kind of celebrate this place now and encourage people to come here,” Loren Flynn, Area 2 FWP park manager told me. haven’t been able to do it for a long time, so it looks like a win today. ”

Ahead, efforts to restore the remaining adobe walls of the old barracks building and steps to improve historical exhibits, telling not only the story of John Owen and the Bitterroot, but the contributions of the Salish tribe and others in this first Montana community. And also by researching artifacts collected from the site over the years.

The park opens to the public Thursday.


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