Historic Places – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 06:02:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://deepwood.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2-150x150.png Historic Places – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ 32 32 Returning soon to Green Street, this Christmas tradition celebrates Gainesville’s 20-year history https://deepwood.net/returning-soon-to-green-street-this-christmas-tradition-celebrates-gainesvilles-20-year-history/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 02:13:38 +0000 https://deepwood.net/returning-soon-to-green-street-this-christmas-tradition-celebrates-gainesvilles-20-year-history/ November 22—Everyday, Green Street remains a busy thoroughfare flanked by Victorian and neoclassical architecture from the 19th and 20th centuries. But on the first Sunday in December, dressed in holiday grandeur, the half-mile corridor becomes a passageway to Gainesville’s past. Christmas on the green street When: 4-7 p.m. December 4 Where: Historic Green Street, Gainesville […]]]>

November 22—Everyday, Green Street remains a busy thoroughfare flanked by Victorian and neoclassical architecture from the 19th and 20th centuries.

But on the first Sunday in December, dressed in holiday grandeur, the half-mile corridor becomes a passageway to Gainesville’s past.

Christmas on the green street

When: 4-7 p.m. December 4

Where: Historic Green Street, Gainesville

More information: gainesville.org

Since 2002, Christmas on Green Street has drawn crowds in the thousands to celebrate the holiday season with a parade and tours of historic homes, which claim a spot on the National Register of Historic Places.

The tradition was invented by the Gainesville Historical Society, which held the festivities year after year until it disbanded in 2018, when the event moved to the city of Gainesville.

Today, it remains the largest single-day event the city hosts, according to Main Street Gainesville manager Nicole Parham, and a meaningful way to celebrate the Gainesville of Christmases past, present and future.

“The Historic District is the heart of Gainesville — the origins, the things that helped us become who we are now as a community,” Parham said. “When we can celebrate our past, it’s also a way of celebrating today and also what’s to come. There’s such a mix of generations coming together. I think so often in our culture, we separate all generations – we have programs for children and young adults programs and things for the elderly, but things like Christmas on Green Street bring all generations together to celebrate together.”

This year’s Christmas on Green Street is scheduled for 4-7 p.m. on Sunday, December 4, with vintage cars, festive floats and lively marching bands.

The festivities kick off with the roads closing at 2 p.m. and the food court opening at 3 p.m.

The parade begins at 4 p.m., beginning near the “Y” intersection of Thompson Bridge Road and Riverside Drive and continuing along Green Street to EE Butler Parkway before exiting left onto Spring Street.

True to tradition, Santa Claus will close the march aboard a Gainesville fire truck before magically appearing at the Norton Agency during open houses, which are scheduled to begin around 5:30 p.m. immediately after the parade.

This year, each house has its own QR code that customers can scan and learn more about their historical background.

The solemn lighting of the Rotary Tree, a giant holly bush dominating the corner of Academy and Green streets, is scheduled for 6:30 p.m.

As a beloved tradition that stands the test of time, Christmas on Green Street remains an important way to preserve history and a sense of place amid Gainesville’s continued growth and development, according to Parham.

“It brings a sense of place, a sense of tradition, and as a community it’s part of our foundation,” she said. “These are things that bring our culture to life.”

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Hayward: 7 Incredible Places to Visit in Hayward, California https://deepwood.net/hayward-7-incredible-places-to-visit-in-hayward-california/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 09:08:20 +0000 https://deepwood.net/hayward-7-incredible-places-to-visit-in-hayward-california/ Tourist Attractions – Places to Visit in Hayward, CA Located at the bottom of San Francisco Bay, Hayward, California is an affordable and convenient base for exploring the Bay Area. It is an ideal base for sightseeing and getting involved in the local community. Hayward is a diverse community, with a population of approximately 163,000 […]]]>

Tourist Attractions – Places to Visit in Hayward, CA

Located at the bottom of San Francisco Bay, Hayward, California is an affordable and convenient base for exploring the Bay Area. It is an ideal base for sightseeing and getting involved in the local community.

Hayward is a diverse community, with a population of approximately 163,000 people. Hayward has over 3,000 acres of open space. This area includes parks and trails. It is also home to one of California’s first Japanese gardens.

Hayward, California is also home to several art galleries, including the Sun Gallery. This venue has a great calendar of events, including free art on Saturdays. You can also attend artistic evenings and participate in art camps during the summer.

Hayward Japanese Gardens #1

Located near downtown Hayward, the Japanese Gardens are one of the oldest Japanese gardens in California. The park is maintained by the Hayward Area Recreation and Park District. The park is designed in a traditional Japanese style.

There are many reasons to visit Japanese Gardens, but one of the best is that you get a change of pace from the hustle and bustle of the city. The park is a relaxing and contemplative escape from the daily grind.

Places to visit in Hayward
22373 N 3rd St, Hayward, CA 94546, USA

Although the name Hayward Japanese Gardens means nothing to you, the park is a gem. You can find several interesting buildings, pavilions and even a tea house. The park has a variety of trees, including a mix of Japanese and Californian varieties.

Garin Regional Park #2

With Dry Creek Pioneer Regional Park and Garin Regional Park, visitors can explore over 4,790 acres. The Garin Barn Visitor Center is open Saturdays and Sundays, Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day weekend.

1320 Garin Ave, Hayward, CA 94544, USA

It features artifacts that are part of the region’s agricultural and livestock heritage. The center also houses a tool shop and a blacksmith shop. The barn that houses the visitor center also contains a collection of antique farm machinery.

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center #3

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center, a nature interpretive center, focuses on the ecology and natural history of Hayward. It is mainly used as a resource center for local schools on field trips.

The Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center can be visited by the general public on weekends. The center focuses on the wetland and coastal ecosystems of San Francisco Bay.

4901 Breakwater Ave, Hayward, CA 94545, United States

There are exhibits on native and aquatic wildlife, as well as rotating exhibits on related topics. Built next to restored salt ponds, the interpretive center was opened in 1986.

Sulfur Creek Nature Center #4

Sulfur Creek Nature Center, Hayward, CA is a wildlife education and rehabilitation center. The mission of this nature and wildlife center is to promote a sense of responsibility for the well-being of the planet by connecting people and animals through wildlife rehabilitation and education.

1801 D St, Hayward, CA 94541, USA

Visitors can see the wildlife education programs offered by the Sulfur Creek Nature Center up close. The center offers education and rehabilitation as well as special programs, birthday parties, and volunteer opportunities, among other activities.

Don Castro Regional Recreation Area #5

The Castro Valley border in Hayward is covered by the Don Castro Regional Recreation Area, which covers just over 100 acres. Local residents love the clear blue swimming lagoon of this urban oasis.

Hikers have the opportunity to explore the shoreline of San Lorenzo Creek Reservoir, and anglers are permitted year-round. A large shallow area is available for children in the swimming lagoon.

22400 Woodroe Avenue, Hayward, CA 94541, USA

It is secured with ropes. The Chabot-to Garin Trail and the Bay Area Ridge Trail are also accessible in the Don Castro Regional Recreation Area.

Green Shutter Hotel #6

Located in Hayward, California, the Green Shutter Hotel is a two-story building dating back to the 1920s. It was originally built as a blacksmith shop, but has since evolved into a hotel.

The building has been at the center of controversy. The hotel has been the target of numerous complaints from shopkeepers and even the Hayward police. The hotel has also undergone illegal modifications.

22650 Main Street, Hayward, CA

The hotel has been a stopover for low-income residents. Often tenants were seen in various stages of undressing. Some have even made it their home.

Meek Estate Carriage House #7

Located near Hayward, California, the Meek Estate Carriage House is a historic landmark. The building was constructed in 1869 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The property was once owned by William Meek, who grew up in Iowa.

The house has been renovated several times. It is currently maintained by the Hayward Area Historical Society. As well as being a museum, the mansion is used for plays recreating local history. It also serves as a ballroom.

413 003101304, Hayward, CA 94541, USA

Meek Mansion was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. It underwent renovations to add bedrooms, bathrooms, and a ballroom. It also has a structural bracing system.

FAQs: Hayward, California

Is Hayward CA a good place to live?

Located in the East Bay, Hayward, California is the sixth largest city in the Bay Area. With a population of approximately 150,000, Hayward offers residents an ideal location to explore the Bay Area.
Hayward is located in Alameda County, approximately 25 miles from San Francisco. Its location makes it easy to travel to the rest of the Bay Area. It has two BART stations.

What is Hayward California famous for?

Located on the east side of the bay, Hayward is a town that offers a combination of urban and suburban living. Its central location makes it easy to visit San Francisco and Silicon Valley. With its beautiful natural landscape, it is a perfect place to explore on a day trip.

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This Colorado Springs cemetery is famous for its spooky events https://deepwood.net/this-colorado-springs-cemetery-is-famous-for-its-spooky-events/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 07:18:57 +0000 https://deepwood.net/this-colorado-springs-cemetery-is-famous-for-its-spooky-events/ Walking through any cemetery can be quite scary, but evergreen graveyard in Colorado Springs is particularly strange – even for most people who work there. Indeed, historic cemeteries in El Paso County are believed to be haunted. Evergreen Cemetery was even featured on an episode of Biography Channel “My Ghost Story” during which several people […]]]>

Walking through any cemetery can be quite scary, but evergreen graveyard in Colorado Springs is particularly strange – even for most people who work there.

Indeed, historic cemeteries in El Paso County are believed to be haunted. Evergreen Cemetery was even featured on an episode of Biography Channel “My Ghost Story” during which several people described out-of-the-ordinary experiences that took place in the spooky place in Colorado.

More than 90,000 people are buried beneath the 220 acres of Evergreen Cemetery, but residents aren’t sure which of these souls is responsible for the ongoing bouts of paranormal activity that occur at the site.

History of the cemetery

Evergreen Cemetery was established in 1871, shortly after Colorado Springs was founded. Another cemetery was needed, due to the increasing growth in the area. However, several of the plots inside the cemetery date back even further to the 1860spredates the city altogether.

The cemetery was donated to the city of Colorado Springs in 1875 by the city’s founder, General William Jackson Palmer. Many notable Coloradans are buried here, including the poet Helen Hunt Jackson and General Palmer himself.

In 1910, a small chapel was built to store coffins and accommodate funeral services. Coffins were often kept in the basement of the chapel during cold winters, especially when the ground was too frozen to dig up. A hoist was used to lower the coffins and raise them. To this day, stains from the bodily fluids of those who died in the late 19th century are still visible on the subterranean slabs in the chapel’s basement.

In 1993, Evergreen was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It is only the second cemetery in the state of Colorado to receive such an honor.

RELATED: Legend Says A Vampire Is Buried In This Colorado Cemetery

paranormal activity

Stories involving the presence of spirits in the cemetery have been swirling around for years.

Most haunted events tend to take place inside the historic chapel. Not only are strange and unexplained noises often reported, but there have also been some frightening sightings. Dark figures were seen inside the small building, usually near the coffin lifter and near the staircase.

On two separate occasions, different women had very similar experiences when visiting the basement of the chapel. Both women reportedly felt a cold wave of negativity flow through them as they descended the stairs. Once they got downstairs, both women said they felt extremely uncomfortable.

According to cemetery staff, on several nighttime visits, guests observed a flying figure hovering over a group of headstones. The unknown cat-like entity is said to be about five feet long and its body does not touch the ground.

Finally, a curious cemetery volunteer named Michael Coletta took it upon himself to bring a KII meter to get a better idea of ​​the spirits that linger on the property. Unsurprisingly, abnormally high readings were recorded near the stairwell. Coletta said the experience gave her goosebumps.

Coletta’s unusual readings caught the attention of Biography Channel. In 2011, a television crew was brought to the cemetery for further investigation. During the filming of the episode “The Hand of Death” the spirits certainly came to play – Honestly, Hollywood couldn’t have directed it better. Coletta was in the basement of the chapel reading for ghosts when a very heavy wooden crypt door in the middle of the room opened by itself. No wind was present to cause the door to open. Then the door also closed by itself. The whole scenario was filmed, proving that no ropes, winds or wires caused the movement. Also, cemetery staff explained that the century-old doors are difficult to open and usually stick a little. To this day, no one can explain how this happened, and the door never moved on its own again.

It’s stories like these that lead even some of the biggest skeptics to believe in the paranormal.

Walk through Cedar Hill Cemetery in Colorado

Cedar Hill Cemetery is one of the most historic cemeteries in the state.

Take a virtual tour of the haunted cemetery in downtown Colorado

The abandoned cemetery in Central City, Colorado is said to be one of the most haunted places in the state.

Colorado’s Mount Vernon Cemetery Has Two Graves + Tons Of History

Colorado’s Mount Vernon Cemetery has only two marked graves, and although small and off the beaten path, it is an important part of the state’s history.

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2 Award-Winning Examples of Sonoma County’s Best Home Architecture https://deepwood.net/2-award-winning-examples-of-sonoma-countys-best-home-architecture/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 20:52:08 +0000 https://deepwood.net/2-award-winning-examples-of-sonoma-countys-best-home-architecture/ They sit on opposite ends of Sonoma County — one literally straddling the Marin County line and the other a few miles south of the Mendocino County line on the far north coast. But both are uniquely Sonoma in vernacular and represent some of the best new residential architecture north of the Golden Gate Bridge. […]]]>

They sit on opposite ends of Sonoma County — one literally straddling the Marin County line and the other a few miles south of the Mendocino County line on the far north coast. But both are uniquely Sonoma in vernacular and represent some of the best new residential architecture north of the Golden Gate Bridge.

One is called Owl House and sits comfortably in a hillside bowl, with views of western Marin and Sonoma counties. The other is on a meadow in the historic southern part of Sea Ranch. Both are contemporary, highly sensitive to their placement in the natural setting, and both were singled out for top honors at the recent Redwood Empire chapter of the American Institute of Architects.

The awards, held every two years, recognize outstanding design work submitted by one of the Chapter’s 158 members or an outside architect with a project within the Chapter’s sphere, an area once commonly referred to as “The Redwood Empire”. It includes Sonoma, Mendocino, Lake, Humboldt, Del Norte, Siskiyou, Modoc, and Trinity counties.

Fifteen projects – residential, commercial and public use, built and unbuilt – received awards at ceremonies last month. Some winners have replaced structures lost in the 2017 wildfires, marking a changing vineyard landscape in the wake of so much devastation.

Only MAD Architecture’s Owl House in Petaluma, Sea Ranch Meadow II by Turnbull Griffin Haesloop in Berkeley, and a small spa and retreat in a Napa Valley vineyard by Signum Architecture in St. Helena received the highest honors.

But the judges recognized a number of other projects with awards of merit, the second-highest honour. They included the new science classroom building at Cardinal Newman High School designed by Quattrocchi Kwok Architects of Santa Rosa, a six-story green parking lot in Palo Alto designed by RossDrulisCusenbery Architecture of Sonoma, and a reconstructed Nuns Canyon Fire House in the Sonoma Valley. by Mork. Ulnes Architects of San Francisco.

Merit awards also went to Weddle Gilmore Architects of Scottsdale, Arizona, for the renovation of the former Flamingo Resort in Santa Rosa; V and BAR Architects + Interiors of San Francisco for the new Fountaingrove Golf Club; and Asquared Studios of Santa Rosa for an adobe house in Sonoma with a pagoda-style roof.

The judging team was made up of architects from the Washington, DC chapter of the American Institute of Architects, said Carissa Greene, executive director of the Santa Rosa-based Redwood Empire Group.

Although based on the opposite coast, DC Architects are all familiar with Sonoma County, especially from studying the visionary Sea Ranch in architecture school.

“Sonoma County is on the map now,” Greene said. “We are a destination. Of course, we are known for our food and our drinks, but also for our architecture. »

Sonoma County’s dramatic, diverse landscape and ever-abundant open space can be an architect’s dream palette.

Growing from the meadows

Mary Dooley, co-principal with her husband, Chris Lynch, with MAD Architecture in Petaluma, created a contemporary compact retirement home for two Palo Alto graphic designers on the county line west of Petaluma.

The house was designed to respect the land and its history as part of the old Olompali land grant, which stretched between Novato and Petaluma. The land grant was once held by Camilo Ynitia, a 19th century leader of the Coast Miwoks and the last Hoipu, or leader, of the Miwok community living in Olompali. He was the only Native American in the northern end of Alta California to receive a land grant during the period of Mexican rule.

An old fence line, left over from the days of the rancho, remains on the property. Out of respect for the property’s history, Dooley chose to maintain it and designed the house to follow the fence rather than across it, which meant creating an angle at one end.

The house sits in a bowl-shaped depression in the land, which naturally insulates it from the noise of the road below and the winds that regularly cross the Petaluma Gap. The house is surrounded by native grasses near a grove of blue oaks and sculptural outcrops of serpentine.

Dooley said the site spoke to him, saying, “We all grow up on the prairies here.” She regularly consults the field when setting up and orienting a structure.

To maximize the views over the valley and up the hill, she sloped the roof at both ends, creating a shape that makes the house look like it’s about to take flight, like hawks and red-headed vultures chasing the earth . Solar panels are installed on one half of the roof to capture as much sunlight as possible.

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Grant to Increase Community Events at Governor Sprague Mansion https://deepwood.net/grant-to-increase-community-events-at-governor-sprague-mansion/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 01:02:27 +0000 https://deepwood.net/grant-to-increase-community-events-at-governor-sprague-mansion/ By Pam Schiff Everything old is new again. Or, in this case, something old gets a few new upgrades. Governor Sprague Mansion is the recipient of a $10,000 grant that purchased a large event tent and heaters. Sprague Mansion dates back to 1790 and was the home of two Rhode Island governors; it is located […]]]>

By Pam Schiff

Everything old is new again. Or, in this case, something old gets a few new upgrades.

Governor Sprague Mansion is the recipient of a $10,000 grant that purchased a large event tent and heaters.

Sprague Mansion dates back to 1790 and was the home of two Rhode Island governors; it is located at 1351 Cranston Street and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.

In the fall of 2021, the Cranston YMCA, Cranston Historical Society, Cranston Councilman John Donegan, former Councilman Steve Stycos, and resident and community attorney Grace Swinski teamed up to apply for a Rhode Island grant Foundation to increase community events at the Governor Sprague Mansion. The Governor Sprague Mansion is a historic and cultural centerpiece of Ward 3 and now serves as the headquarters of the Cranston Historical Society.

This project aims to make this place a community hub where the diverse residents of Cranston can come together not only to celebrate, but also for their mental, emotional and physical well-being.

Community partners were pleased to announce that they received the grant earlier this year; all supplies have arrived and are currently stored in the shed on the grounds of the mansion.

“Much of the history of this part of town stems from Governor Sprague’s mansion and Cranston’s printing press. Increasing community access and participation in this space is a way to continue to honor this history and bring people together while creating new memories and building community,” Donegan said.

Tents and heaters will allow Governor Sprague Mansion to expand programming into the spring and fall. They plan to partner with and support the programs and services of community groups such as the Cranston Arts Commission, Cranston Public Library, and OneCranston Health Equity Zone, among others.

Additionally, as part of the grant, the Cranston YMCA will hire and train bilingual Zumba instructors to lead outdoor programs on the grounds of the mansion.

“The Cranston Y is not just a gymnasium and swimming pool, it is a place that welcomes all members of the community and strives to provide programs and services that support youth development, a way of healthy living and social responsibility. Partnering with wonderful organizations like the Cranston Historical Society at Governor Sprague Mansion helps the Y expand its programs and services beyond our four walls, into the community we are here to serve,” said Christy Clausen, executive director of the Cranston YMCA.

This partnership and project creates the opportunity to connect residents to each other, residents to organizations, and to build a more connected and cohesive community.

“Given that the Governor Sprague Mansion is located on one of the largest green spaces in a rather densely populated area, the Cranston Historical Society thought we should open our grounds to community and government groups. We hope that people who visit the venue for one of these events will develop an appreciation for the history of the area and the work the Society does to preserve, protect and promote our city’s past,” said Sandra Moyer. , president of Cranston Historical Society.

The visions of the future of space and the mansion are endless and are only limited by people’s imaginations.

“I have walked past the Sprague Mansion several times but never realized what a wonderful green space we had in the area until the Christmas tree lighting. Seeing the locals come together as a community to celebrate the season was powerful. When I was asked to be part of a group to come up with strategies to make outdoor community events more accessible, I was hooked. I envision many community organizations using the tents and heaters in this space and keeping the corner of Cranston St. and Dyer Ave alive. with events for the city,” said Grace Swinski, Ward 3 resident and community advocate.

For more information about the Cranston Historical Society, call (401) 944-9226, or cranston.historical.society@gmail.com or www.cranstonhistoricalsociety.org.

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Saving History One Landmark at a Time: Ongoing Restoration Work at the Grotto of the Ave Maria | New https://deepwood.net/saving-history-one-landmark-at-a-time-ongoing-restoration-work-at-the-grotto-of-the-ave-maria-new/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/saving-history-one-landmark-at-a-time-ongoing-restoration-work-at-the-grotto-of-the-ave-maria-new/ Weather and time can conspire to degrade and deteriorate even the best constructed landmark, and that’s true whether that landmark is the Shrine of Fatima in Portugal – or a miniature representation of it in Cullman, Ala . Ave Maria Grotto is a four-acre landscape park located on a former quarry on the grounds of […]]]>

Weather and time can conspire to degrade and deteriorate even the best constructed landmark, and that’s true whether that landmark is the Shrine of Fatima in Portugal – or a miniature representation of it in Cullman, Ala .

Ave Maria Grotto is a four-acre landscape park located on a former quarry on the grounds of St. Bernard Abbey. This setting houses 125 miniature reproductions of some of the world’s most famous religious structures – stone and concrete models that were the life work of Brother Joseph Zoettl, a Benedictine monk at the monastery who dedicated five decades to the project. , only stopping work in 1958 due to poor health.

Constructed largely from trash – discarded building materials, bricks, marbles, tiles, pipes, seashells, plastic statues and animals, costume jewelery and even old cosmetic jars – the cave is a cornucopia of religious models and icons, a world pilgrimage site that can be visited in an afternoon.

Those who spend an afternoon visiting today will not only find miniature reproductions of installations such as St. Peter’s Basilica, the Abbey of Monte Cassino or even more secular sites such as the Leaning Tower of Pisa or a German castle, they will probably encounter miniature constructions. sights and artists like Allison Bohorfoush or blacksmith Allen Kress, two members of a team of craftsmen working to repair the damage caused by decades of sun, rain, wind and Mother Nature’s cold on outdoor attractions which will attract more than 35,000 visitors per year.

That number of tourists is not lost on Renee Welsh, and it ties in well with her successful application for a visual arts program grant from the Alabama State Council on the Arts. But the need to renovate the structures of a facility that has been on the National Register since 1984 — the cave was the first nomination of a folk art environment in Alabama to the National Register of Historic Places — was more than that.

“It’s community driven,” Welsh said. “It’s the passion and the love for the cave of the local people.

Turning that passion into a call to action, Welsh and others have identified “between 30 and 35 structures that need love, care and restoration”, starting with the miniature Die Wald Kapelle – the chapel in Woods.

This chapel is representative of one the Bavarian-born monk would have known since his youth, Bohorfoush said. Its restoration took nearly three months, as Birmingham artist Kress and master glassmaker Tom Dameron worked to not only preserve a legacy, but also secure a future.

“I can imagine the influence Brother Joseph’s work has had on people who come here from all walks of life, from all religions,” Bohorfoush said. “That’s the whole story.”

This is also what it is about for Kress, whose local heritage is built on the cave.

“I’m on a loop,” Kress said. “My great-grandfather and my grandfather both worked here. The monks hired local farmers who farmed in the summer, but were hired in the winter when things were slow.

The slow weather meant working in the rock quarry and logging, Kress said, helping to shape the grounds of the monastery, including what would become the Forest Trail that holds Brother Joseph’s masterpieces.

“Now I’m back, 140 years later,” Kress said, and doing work in that same area. As well as building an iron frame needed for Die Wald Kapelle – “You can’t see it now, but it was about to fall on itself,” he said. – Kress is also forging and installing new handrails throughout the park, with no detail too small to overlook.

“I try to mix the new with the old,” Kress said of the railings. “Even the style of the finish, beeswax and linseed oil, is very traditional.”

It’s this tradition that is the most forward-thinking part of the project, said Amy Jenkins, visual arts program manager for the Alabama State Council on the Arts.

Jenkins said the arts council understands that a multi-year restoration of cave structures is important not only for the abbey, but also for Alabama.

“This project has been very well reviewed and researched,” she said. “Ave Grotto is… unprecedented in the state. Safeguarding this artistic environment is essential.

And for the grant to restore the first part of the project, the chapel in the woods, a multi-level review – including approval by the 15-member board appointed by the governor – was only the first of what Jenkins hopes will be an ongoing relationship.

“It was a slam dunk, for us, really,” she said of the council funding the project.

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Carnegie Library on Missouri’s Peril List | Local News https://deepwood.net/carnegie-library-on-missouris-peril-list-local-news/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 00:15:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/carnegie-library-on-missouris-peril-list-local-news/ The Carnegie Library in Joplin has been placed on the Missouri Places in Peril list. Places in Peril is an annual list of endangered historic places in Missouri compiled by Missouri Preservation, a grassroots conservationist organization that advocates saving ancient structures in danger of disappearing. Places on the list are nominated by those affected and […]]]>

The Carnegie Library in Joplin has been placed on the Missouri Places in Peril list.

Places in Peril is an annual list of endangered historic places in Missouri compiled by Missouri Preservation, a grassroots conservationist organization that advocates saving ancient structures in danger of disappearing.

Places on the list are nominated by those affected and decided by a committee of preservation advocates, according to information provided by the organization.

The construction of Joplin’s first library in 1902 was funded by a $40,000 grant from industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. A tax voted by the voters of Joplin paid for the operation of the library.

Historic preservation authorities say it was one of the first libraries in Missouri to be donated by Carnegie, known for his philanthropic efforts toward building libraries. Carnegie gave $40 million of his fortune to cities across the country to pay for more than 1,600 libraries between 1886 and 1919, according to the National Park Service, which maintains the National Register of Historic Places.

Joplin’s two-story building was designed by a regionally renowned architect, August Michaelis, who chose the neoclassical design style using world-renowned Carthage marble.

In 1916, a two-story addition was built and a skylight added above the original structure. This ended up creating problems.

In the 1960s, a structural analysis determined that the second floor was not capable of supporting the weight of the books from the upper floors. This ended the use of these floors for book storage and eventually led to the construction of a library at 302 S. Main St. in 1981.

After the Main Street location opened, the contents of the Carnegie Building were auctioned off and the building was sold to a private landlord who used portions of it for apartment rentals.

In the 1970s, the Carnegie Building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Since then, the building has been periodically vandalized. But despite several decades of vacancy, an assessment of the building earlier this year found there were relatively minor issues for a 120-year-old building, according to Jill Halbach, executive director of the Post Art Library. This raised the hopes of those who were pleading for a project to acquire the building by a local non-profit association.

During these negotiations with the landlord, a fire of suspicious origin broke out in the basement, resulting in what authorities described as severe damage.

Halbach said the Post Art Library submitted the nomination to Places in Peril. She said there were several reasons why the building should be saved.

“I think it’s important architecturally, and it’s important because it’s a Carnegie library and not every city has a Carnegie library,” said Halbach, who is also president of the Joplin Historic Preservation Commission.

Libraries are important institutions because “usually it’s where anyone can go for education or entertainment,” she said.

It is also significant to Joplin because of its ties to the self-taught Michaelis, whose architectural services became in high demand in the Midwest and were used for a number of other locally significant buildings during this period. These include Joplin’s Memorial Hall, First Presbyterian Church, the Christman Building at Fifth and Main streets, and a former Joplin High School building that stood at Fourth Street and Byers Avenue.

Having it listed on Places in Peril draws attention to properties in need for those wishing to invest in historic places.

“It has helped us with buildings in our community,” Halbach said. Union Depot was listed last year and Olivia Apartments was placed on the list in 2020 just before it was purchased by the current developers. Bykota REI and Blue Haven Homes.

The list is important because “it engages more people and fosters collaboration and that’s what it usually takes to save a building,” Halbach said.

The need to try to find a future for the building is more pronounced now because of the fire, according to Halbach and Lori Haun, executive director of the Downtown Joplin Alliance.

“At the time of the fire, negotiations were underway between the owner and a non-profit organization” which was then interested in acquiring the building, Halbach said. These negotiations ceased after the fire.

“Obviously the fire put him in more imminent danger,” Halbach said.

Haun said the Olivia building was listed just months before it was damaged by fire in December 2020.

“We think it’s important,” Haun said of the Carnegie Library. “It’s a Carnegie, which is quite unique,” and like the Olivia, it was a public building that played a role in many people’s lives.

Asked how best to reuse the building, Haun said it was probably more suitable as a public destination, such as for educational purposes.

“It’s got a good square footage and apartments probably aren’t suitable because you don’t want to divide it with too many walls,” Haun said. “You would lose some of the structural integrity of the building.”

The downtown alliance can help move a project forward.

“We really think it’s a building worth saving, and we’ll do everything we can to help,” Haun said.

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Carlisle Mister “CM” Williams, Jr. formerly of the East Coast https://deepwood.net/carlisle-mister-cm-williams-jr-formerly-of-the-east-coast/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 13:43:33 +0000 https://deepwood.net/carlisle-mister-cm-williams-jr-formerly-of-the-east-coast/ Carlisle Mister “CM” Williams, Jr., a native of Painter on the east coast of Virginia, died in the early morning of October 28, 2022 at his home in Falmouth, Stafford County, Virginia. A ‘baysider’ born on his grandparents’ farm, his family moved from Painter to Onancock, Virginia when he was 12. CM graduated from Onancock […]]]>

Carlisle Mister “CM” Williams, Jr., a native of Painter on the east coast of Virginia, died in the early morning of October 28, 2022 at his home in Falmouth, Stafford County, Virginia.

A ‘baysider’ born on his grandparents’ farm, his family moved from Painter to Onancock, Virginia when he was 12. CM graduated from Onancock High School in 1955 and from East Carolina University in Greenville, NC, where he earned a BA in Business Administration in 1960.

An Eagle Scout, he has lived his entire life by the morals and values ​​of Scouting. We have all heard many stories of attending the Boy Scout Jamboree in California with his brother Johnny in 1953, crossing our country by train. He was a lifelong Methodist and a member of the Fredericksburg United Methodist Church.

  1. Mr was the first county trustee of Accomack from 1966 to 1983, moving to what he called the ‘high woods’ of Stafford County, serving there as county trustee from 1984 to 2003 .

He was not one to seek recognition, but received numerous honors throughout his professional life, including the Goldey-Beacom College Distinguished Alum and Doctor of Humane Letters from Mary Washington College and the Monroe Medal, all two in 2003. He considered one of his greatest accomplishments, joining others in acquiring George Washington’s childhood home “Ferry Farm” so that present and future generations would have access to an important segment of the history of our nation.

He was instrumental in bringing about the long-planned 1,000-foot runway extension at Stafford Regional Airport and listing Stafford County Government Island on the National Register of Historic Places and on the National Register of Historic Places. Virginia Landmarks Registry. His commitment not only to the present and future of his county, but also to the past, was evident in that he was responsible for the installation of a history wall at Stafford Hospital depicting the history of Stafford County, and his encouragement of the Stafford County Historical Society to have a museum in which to showcase the county’s rich history.

While he didn’t need to be recognized for his lifetime accomplishments, perhaps sharing the following would be most significant to CM’s legacy: his wish to want us all kind, honest and always strive to do our best.

His survivors include his wife, Barbara Schuyler Williams; his son and daughter, Carlisle Mister “Carl” Williams III and his wife Kim, of Mechanicsville, VA, and Valerie Taylor Williams Smith of Onancock, VA; one sister, Carla Lynn Williams Lloyd of Onancock, VA; two brothers, John Tankard “Johnny” Williams of Parksley, VA, and Brian “Craig” Williams of Onancock, VA; sisters-in-law, Maxine Turlington Williams of Glen Allen, VA, and Dawn Elisabeth Engen and her husband Gunnar, of Chesapeake, VA; two stepsons, Andrew Downs Henderson III, and James Tarleton “Jim” Henderson and his wife Tisha, all of Stafford, VA; grandchildren, Brittany Taylor Biggers (Chad) of Minneapolis, MN, Paige Spencer Smith of Fredericksburg, VA, Taylor Williams Murphy (Patrick) of Mechanicsville, VA, Schuyler Custis Henderson of Arlington, VA, Carlisle Mister “CJ” Williams IV of Mechanicsville, VA, Jackson Cole Henderson of Pasadena, MD, and Wyatt James Henderson of Stafford, VA; the mother of his children, Dolly Taylor Williams of Onancock, VA; and several nieces, nephews, cousins ​​and their families.

  1. M. was predeceased by his parents, Carlisle Mister Williams and Evelyn Hickman Williams; one sister, Evelyn “Lorraine” Williams; one brother, Thomas Wayne “Tommy” Williams; and a sister-in-law, Peggy Gray Williams.

A funeral service to celebrate his life and faith will be held Saturday, November 5, 2022 at 3:00 p.m., from Fredericksburg United Methodist Church, 308 Hanover Street, Fredericksburg, VA 22401, followed by a reception.

A funeral service will be held on Sunday, November 6, 2022 at 1:00 p.m., from Fairview Lawn Cemetery, Hill Street, Onancock, VA 23417, followed by a reception.

Memorial donations in CM’s memory may be made to Fredericksburg United Methodist Church, 308 Hanover Street, Fredericksburg, VA 22401, or to Micah Ecumenical Ministries, 1013 Princess Anne Street, Fredericksburg, VA 22401.

Memorial tributes may be shared with his family at www.williamsfuneralhomes.com.

Arrangements from Williams-Onancock Funeral Home.

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Chief’s Island and Arago Light https://deepwood.net/chiefs-island-and-arago-light/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 00:47:28 +0000 https://deepwood.net/chiefs-island-and-arago-light/ Tales from the End of a South Oregon Coast Lighthouse: Chief’s Island and Arago Light Published on 28/10/22 at 17:33By the staff of the Oregon Coast Beach Connection (Charleston, Oregon) – On August 3, 2013, there was a significant moment in Oregon Coast history that is now somewhat under the radar. It was when the […]]]>

Tales from the End of a South Oregon Coast Lighthouse: Chief’s Island and Arago Light

Published on 28/10/22 at 17:33
By the staff of the Oregon Coast Beach Connection

(Charleston, Oregon) – On August 3, 2013, there was a significant moment in Oregon Coast history that is now somewhat under the radar. It was when the local tribes recovered something valuable that had been stolen from them some 150 years before. Cape Arago Lighthouse – near Coos Bay – originally known as Chief’s Island, was ceded to the Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siletz. In a ceremony led by Captain Mark Reynolds, Commander of Coast Guard Sector North Bend, the promontory which had housed a lighthouse since the 1860s and even a Coast Guard station for a time returned to good hands. . (Cape Arago Lighthouse near Coos Bay, courtesy Manuela Durson – see Manuela Durson Fine Arts for more)

European history around this southern Oregon Coast landmark dates back to 1778, when Captain Robert Cook passed by and named the spot Gregory Point. Regional tribes date back much further here. According to carbon dating, Chief’s Island was occupied by humans between 1,500 and 2,100 years ago.

Chief’s Island / Gregory Point has a variety of stories to tell.

Tales from the End of a South Oregon Coast Lighthouse: Chief's Island and Arago Light
Above: Lighthouse glow, photo Oregon Coast Beach Connection

The area was named Chief’s Island by the local tribes as it was traditionally where the chief had his abode. Yet there are many signs that it has been an intermittent village over these 1,000 years or more. It is a known archaeological site, which partly explains why it is considered so important.

Going back even further, the island is made up of a kind of sandstone and geologically unstable. Some predictions see the area with the lighthouse collapsing over the next decade.

The Cape Arago Lighthouse is certainly not the only story on this small island off the southern coast of Oregon. But it’s a big one. You can see the full history of the Cape Arago Lighthouse here, Surprise Story: There Were Three Cape Arago Lighthouses on the Southern Oregon Coast .


Photo courtesy of Oregon Adventure Coast

The last days of the island in the hands of the United States illustrate this fragility well. According to a 2005 article in the Statesman Journal, a local had seen a new hole in the area emerge. A storm in February of that year brought it to notice. Waves started crossing to the other side, and suddenly you could see across the small island.

At the time, the Bureau of Land Management said you could throw millions of dollars at the thing and it would still go down.

Nearby, on the cliffs overlooking Lighthouse Beach, an elderly woman witnessed the instability of this area. The cliffs are made of the same material as Chief’s Island.

Irene Quick had bought land by the sea there in the 1940s, starting by building a cabin there. Running water didn’t come until the 1970s, so for thirty years they had an addiction to what was called a “million dollar view” of the lighthouse. A full house was eventually built, but in the meantime the cliffs continued to erode. 35 feet has disappeared over the decades, even taking the outhouse with it.

The lighthouse itself was a victim of this collapse. At least one of the structure’s reconstructions was tied to erosion of the area, forcing officials on the Oregon coast to rebuild the next one back.

Quick was 90 when the Statesman Journal spoke to him. She also recounted another tantalizing tidbit: Chief’s Island was sometimes still walkable during extremely low tide events.


The bridge over Cape Arago Light, decades ago

In the mid-2000s, she was lucky enough to be one of the last people to cross the rickety bridge to see the lighthouse. At that time, it had been closed for years. This was largely due to the archaeological importance of the place, the fact that it was sacred to the local tribes because so many ancestors were there, and security concerns. In the bridge’s later years, however, it was dangerous, fragile, and slippery. Even local tribes had to obtain permits to cross for ceremonies or visits with their ancestors.

A group in November 2003 was one of the last forays across, and according to reports, the Coast Guard only allowed two or three at a time to walk across this unstable bridge.

For a time, charter boats were closing in to get a better view, but were not allowed to make landfall.

While the Cape Arago Lighthouse was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1993, its days as a visible attraction were numbered. Even then, the process was slowly brewing to bring it back to the tribes and cut off all access. In the early 2000s, this process began to move forward in earnest, slowly moving through Washington, D.C.

The light was deactivated in 2006.

In 2012, a year before the signing ceremony, the bridge was finally dismantled. Just prior to this, Coast Guard Engineering Officer Lt. Jennifer Lopez was interviewed by The Associated Press saying the lighthouse was being repaired and ready for retirement. The walls were repaired, sealed and repainted to improve its condition and make it watertight.

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Walton Street Park earns Local Historic Landmark designation https://deepwood.net/walton-street-park-earns-local-historic-landmark-designation/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 23:31:58 +0000 https://deepwood.net/walton-street-park-earns-local-historic-landmark-designation/ ASHEVILLE — City Council on October 25 unanimously approved Local Historic Landmark designation for Walton Street Park and Pool, a beloved community venue that is vastly underfunded and undermaintained. The property, which becomes the county’s 50th historic landmark, according to Alex Cole, the city’s historic preservation planner, is a 4.37-acre parcel in the Southside neighborhood […]]]>

ASHEVILLE — City Council on October 25 unanimously approved Local Historic Landmark designation for Walton Street Park and Pool, a beloved community venue that is vastly underfunded and undermaintained.

The property, which becomes the county’s 50th historic landmark, according to Alex Cole, the city’s historic preservation planner, is a 4.37-acre parcel in the Southside neighborhood that is home to the Southside-era swimming pool. segregation of 1947, now closed, but once the only municipal park and swimming area for the black population of Asheville.

Council member Sandra Kilgore said she was one of countless Southside residents who grew up swimming at the Walton Street pool, and when she returned to Asheville in 2012 she was reminded of the controversy that surrounded the restoration of the pool – a controversy that still continues a decade later.

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