Historic Places – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 10:49:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://deepwood.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2-150x150.png Historic Places – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ 32 32 The Compass Inn Museum in Laughlintown celebrates its 50th anniversary https://deepwood.net/the-compass-inn-museum-in-laughlintown-celebrates-its-50th-anniversary/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/the-compass-inn-museum-in-laughlintown-celebrates-its-50th-anniversary/ The 18th century Laughlintown Inn originally provided respite and lodging for travelers and herdsmen for 63 years. In its present form, as a restored museum, it has been welcoming tourists for 50 years. The Ligonier Valley Historical Society, which runs the museum, celebrated this modern milestone at its recent annual dinner. The festivities will continue […]]]>

The 18th century Laughlintown Inn originally provided respite and lodging for travelers and herdsmen for 63 years.

In its present form, as a restored museum, it has been welcoming tourists for 50 years.

The Ligonier Valley Historical Society, which runs the museum, celebrated this modern milestone at its recent annual dinner. The festivities will continue with a Régence ball, scheduled for July 16.

Details of the dance will be available soon, according to Theresa Gay Rohall, the company’s executive director.

“We’re going to have a ball on a summer night, on a dance floor,” she said, noting that the event will feature the type of country dancing familiar to fans of Jane Austen novels or the Bridgerton TV series.

Accompaniment will be provided by The Wayward Companions of Pittsburgh, specializing in 18th century music for the tavern and parlor. Brett Walker will serve as dance master.

In keeping with the inn’s role in the area’s transportation history, Rohall said, the company is in the process of acquiring a horse-drawn delivery wagon. The company already owns other historic vehicles, including a Conestoga wagon and an 1830s-style Concord stagecoach.

The inn opened in 1799, two years after Laughlintown was founded, in a log building built by the first landowner Philip Freeman. After several changes of ownership, Robert and Rachel Armor took over the business in 1814 and named it Compass Inn, after an inn they previously operated in their home town of Compassville, Chester County.

They expanded the building to serve the growing traffic on the Philadelphia-Pittsburgh Turnpike, which was completed in 1817 and roughly followed the modern Route 30 corridor.

“Five generations of Armor have lived on the property,” Rohall said. For a time, part of the inn was used as a general store and post office.

The property, which had been converted into apartments, was granted in 1966 to the fledgling historical society, thanks to a donation from the Richard King Mellon Foundation.

“The society was looking for permanent housing and space for its archives when this opportunity arose,” Rohall said. “When they realized what they had, they raised additional funds from the community to turn it into a museum,” which opened in 1972.

With the help of an architect, the society restored the inn to resemble its 1830s heyday and rebuilt several outbuildings, including a kitchen, blacksmith shop, and barn.

Over the years, the company purchased two adjacent lots. “It now gives us the full footprint of the original Compass Inn along Route 30,” Rohall said. “It’s a big problem for us.”

The society’s museum was not the first to open to the public on the property. Charlie Armor exhibits his collection of antiquities from 1894.

“He was the first historian here,” Rohall said. “When he died, many of those items went to the Western Pennsylvania Historical Society, but some may have been brought back here.”

This includes spinning wheels. Robert and Rachel Armor’s marriage license and Robert’s top hat and desk are also on display at the museum.

The museum is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

At the society’s annual meeting, State Representative Leslie Rossi (R-Unity) presented a House proclamation recognizing the museum’s 50th anniversary.

The company named new board members Michael Doucette, Diane Harshberger, Angela Moffat and Eric Wallis and honored two outgoing members for their six years of service – Jim O’Connor and George Conte, who served as chairman for three year.

Visit www.compassinn.org for more information on the historical society and the museum.

Jeff Himler is an editor of the Tribune-Review. You can contact Jeff at 724-836-6622, jhimler@triblive.com or via Twitter .

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The plaque designating a Bourne site as a historic place is ready to hang https://deepwood.net/the-plaque-designating-a-bourne-site-as-a-historic-place-is-ready-to-hang/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 07:43:25 +0000 https://deepwood.net/the-plaque-designating-a-bourne-site-as-a-historic-place-is-ready-to-hang/ BOURNE – The City Historic Commission has obtained the plaque recently issued by the United States Register of Historic Places for the Jonathan Bourne Historic Center beside the Keene Street Canal in the Village of Bourne. The distinctive yellow-brick structure was funded by the daughter of New Bedford whaling merchant Jonathan Bourne and opened as […]]]>

BOURNE – The City Historic Commission has obtained the plaque recently issued by the United States Register of Historic Places for the Jonathan Bourne Historic Center beside the Keene Street Canal in the Village of Bourne.

The distinctive yellow-brick structure was funded by the daughter of New Bedford whaling merchant Jonathan Bourne and opened as the city’s central library in 1897.

Library operations were moved to the former Bourne Grammar/Frances Stowell Primary School and opened in Sandwich Road in 1988.

The original function of the current archives building is named on the American plaque, Historic Commission acting chairwoman Deborah Burgess said June 14. Thus, the historic center is designated by the federal government as the municipal library in memory of Jonathan Bourne.

Burgess said the commission was coordinating with the Bourne facilities department to secure the plaque to the structure, which when opened directly overlooked the River Scusset.

The Cape Cod Military Museum is located at the Jonathan Bourne Historic Center, 30 Keene St., in Bourne Village.

The building has architectural flourishes of yesteryear; including a distinctive cupola of form and function; think of a functional weather vane at the top.

There are two other US Register sites in the village; the restored yellow clapboard Briggs-McDermott House in Sandwich Road and the Aptucxet Trading Post off Shore Road.

The Briggs campus includes the horseshoe/blacksmith shop that served President Grover Cleveland, who vacationed at what is now Gray Gables.

]]> Review of the history and significance of four LGBTQ sites newly listed by the National Trust for Historic Places | New https://deepwood.net/review-of-the-history-and-significance-of-four-lgbtq-sites-newly-listed-by-the-national-trust-for-historic-places-new/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 22:43:26 +0000 https://deepwood.net/review-of-the-history-and-significance-of-four-lgbtq-sites-newly-listed-by-the-national-trust-for-historic-places-new/ Preserving spaces is integral to sustaining America’s gay communities and remembering the hard work of their members in the physical establishment. places of resistance in the face of judicial repression, violence and generational intolerance. Terms like “Gay power” convey the desire for visibility in these spaces that have evolved due to their fiercely contested existence. […]]]>

Preserving spaces is integral to sustaining America’s gay communities and remembering the hard work of their members in the physical establishment. places of resistance in the face of judicial repression, violence and generational intolerance. Terms like “Gay power” convey the desire for visibility in these spaces that have evolved due to their fiercely contested existence. Today, they serve as a rallying cry for different scholarly interventions initiated to protect the significant history of queer history in the United States.

In honor of the list of Pride celebrations taking place in June, the National Trust for Historic Preservation continues to expand documentary research of these sites. Thanks to the 2016 National Park Service Influencer Thematic study which identified several new sites to be proposed to join the group’s two official heritage designations, four new sites have been added to the list since its initial publication.

The cover of the LGBTQ America publication. Designed by Beth Pruitt. Image courtesy of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

In an update released by the Trust this week, the chairman of the board of the Hampton, Va.-based company Rainbow Heritage Network, Jeffrey A. “Free” Harris, detailed the need to include each of the four sites, which he said “represents the diversity that exists within the LGBTQ community as a whole.” This final set of historic sites joins the historic Stonewall Inn on the National registerwhich was added in 1999.

Related on Archinect: The Enduring Importance of Gay Bars in American Cities

“Historically, these historic places have been allowed to exist in communities that have often been overlooked, forgotten, or not considered ‘desirable.’ And, as we know from historic preservation, neighborhood change can visit cities and towns, and that change often happens for the most marginalized communities,” says Harris. “There has been a lot of loss among LGBTQ historic places, and the scholarship we have often shows what once was. Yet one of the best aspects of the scholarship that has been produced is that places that have not been lost will have a chance of survival and possible preservation/adaptive reuse.

Below is a list of the four newly added historic sites contextualized by Harris since the thematic study was published.

Residence Lorraine HansberryNew York City (Enrolled in 2021)

Image Christopher D. Brazee/NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project, 2020/ Courtesy of NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project

The description: Hansberry, a playwright and activist, wrote the play “A Raisin in the Sun” while living in this residence. She was also an activist in the civil rights movement, working with a coalition of African-American artists to advance this cause.

The Slowe Burrill HouseWashington, DC (Enrolled in 2020)

Image Farragutful via Wikimedia CC BY-SA 4.0/Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons User Farragutful (CC BY-SA 4.0)

The description: Lucy Diggs Slowe was Dean of Women at Howard University and a leader in the education of African-American women in the early 20th century, and Mary Burrill was a teacher at Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, one of the top high schools in the nation. . in his days.

Denver’s First Unitary SocietyDenver, Colorado (Joined 2017)

Image courtesy of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

The description: The church was the site of the first gay marriage ceremony in Colorado in 1975. It was also the home, briefly, of the Metropolitan Community Church of the Rockies (a denomination that affirms the LGBTQ community).

Darcelle XVPortland, Oregon (Enrolled in 2021)

Dan Dickinson image via Flickr CC BY-NC 2.0 / Courtesy of Oregon State Historic Preservation Office

The description: Jhe eponymous drag club is one of the oldest clubs in continuous operation with the owner (Walter Cole/Darcelle) still in business. The club opened in 1967.

Harris added, “I’m confident there will be continued growth in the number of designated historic places associated with the LGBTQ community in the years to come. The momentum is there.”

More details on the thematic study on LGBTQ heritage can be read here.

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Mellon Foundation and Lilly Endowment Inc. Award Grants Totaling $1.6 Million to Support Indianapolis-Based Urban Legacy Lands Initiative https://deepwood.net/mellon-foundation-and-lilly-endowment-inc-award-grants-totaling-1-6-million-to-support-indianapolis-based-urban-legacy-lands-initiative/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 23:32:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/mellon-foundation-and-lilly-endowment-inc-award-grants-totaling-1-6-million-to-support-indianapolis-based-urban-legacy-lands-initiative/ Grants for the benefit of the preservation of cultural heritage and education by Collaborative Community Engagement and Land Use Strategies for black heritage in Indianapolis and northeastern Indiana INDIANAPOLIS, June 15, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Urban Legacy Lands Initiative Inc. (ULLI)a newly created Cultural Heritage Development Corporation (CHDC), receives support from two $800,000 grants, totaling $1.6 […]]]>

Grants for the benefit of the preservation of cultural heritage and education by Collaborative Community Engagement and Land Use Strategies for black heritage in Indianapolis and northeastern Indiana

INDIANAPOLIS, June 15, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Urban Legacy Lands Initiative Inc. (ULLI)a newly created Cultural Heritage Development Corporation (CHDC), receives support from two $800,000 grants, totaling $1.6 millionfrom New YorkMellon Foundation and the Indianapolis-based Lilly Endowment Inc. Funding was awarded to the Episcopal Diocese of Indianapolis, which serves as ULLI’s fiscal sponsor. The head of the diocese, the bishop Jennifer Baskerville Burrowswas one of the main promoters of ULLI’s mission and commitment to cultural heritage.

Indiana Avenue, 1964. Source: Indiana Album, Paul W. Wetzel Collection

ULLI will showcase its leadership team and inaugural scope on Wednesday, June 22, 2022at Saint-Philippe Episcopal Church, 720 Dr. Martin Luther King jr. St, Indianapolis, Indianaat 11:30 a.m. Saint-Philippeone of the few remaining historically black congregations in the area, has served the large Indiana Avenue community since the 1880s.

The grants will support ULLI’s focus on centering black cultural heritage in historic revitalization, land use planning, and placemaking. This new CHDC will seek to create a model for the preservation and stewardship of Black heritage communities through equitable and inclusive neighborhood growth and development. ULLI will primarily focus on Historic Indiana Avenue, one of the nation’s most prominent black heritage communities, which had nearly 5,000 homes and businesses razed between 1958 and 2000. League, Goodwin SquareLockefield Gardens*, Saint-Philippe Episcopal Church*, Crispus Attucks High School *, Historic Ransom Place*, Fayette Street Historic Neighborhood, the 500 block of Indiana Avenue*, the headquarters of the “colored” Knights of Pythias* and Flanner House Homes*. *listed on the National Register of Historic Places

Additional work will focus on the preservation of historic Fox Lake, a resort community located Steuben County in northeast Indiana also listed in the National Register. It is about to celebrate its hundredth anniversary and is one of only two existing Black Lake resorts in the country. Fox Lake founding families included executives of the Madam Walker Manufacturing Company who, along with other black professionals from Indianapolis, Fort Wayne, Detroitand Chicagosought a safe place for their families to recreate.

“We are extremely grateful and incredibly proud of the support we have received from the Mellon Foundation and the Lilly Endowment to preserve and rebuild Black Heritage communities,” said Indianapolis– native speaker and ULLI Claudia Polley. “For generations, Indiana Avenue has suffered significant neglect and disrepair. This funding changes that trajectory. Instead of accepting the worst of its past, we now have the opportunity to restore the story of vibrancy, connectivity, and culture of the avenue. ULLI allows us to use the best of the past as a catalyst for the best of the future.”

The non-profit CHDC will champion two key projects –ULLI Land and ULLI Heritage:

  • ULLI Land is the ongoing study and application of best practices and land use planning in/for Black heritage communities, beginning with Historic Indiana Avenue and Historic Fox Lake.

  • ULLI Heritage will focus on black scholarship – within the academy and through personal inquiry – and the practical application of it to support heritage preservation in black communities. The grants will support the establishment of the ULLI Heritage and Humanities Scholarship Program at IUPUI’s Center for African Studies and Culture (CASC), which will be housed at the Madam Walker Legacy Center, the district’s only National Historic Landmark. The scholarship program is unique because ACCS graduate and undergraduate students will receive immersive training and then research black history in Indianapolis to find out how this story can inform the future. This is especially important for these research teams as it allows them to see the positive effect of the work they are doing in their own communities of color.

In 2020, OG Ink Ltd, a small group of elders focused on black heritage, came together to find better solutions for the future of Historic Indiana Avenue. Their efforts followed the example of work started by Reclaim Indiana Avenue and were energized by the Black Lives Matter movement due to the demand for change that emerged after by George Floyd murder. ULLI was born out of these urgent and creative times.

Not only rooted in the past, ULLI is headquartered at 16 Tech, the innovation district at the north end of Indiana Avenue, a tangible demonstration of ULLI’s investment in the future of the neighborhood.

ABOUT URBAN LEGACY LANDS INITIATIVE INC. (ULLI)

Urban Legacy Lands Initiative Inc. is a Cultural Heritage Development Corporation (CHDC) focused on black cultural heritage in historic revitalization, land use planning and placemaking. ULLI’s primary focus begins with the revitalization of historic Indiana Avenue and continues its work with the preservation of historic Fox Lake, one of only two Black Lake resorts in the country. For more information, please visit www.ulli1.org.

Contact:
Tracey Royal
Tracey Royal Communications
(917) 309-0440

Lockefield Gardens and Canal, 2000. Source: Indiana Historical Society

Lockefield Gardens and Canal, 2000. Source: Indiana Historical Society

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SOURCE Urban Legacy Lands Initiative

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Flag and Banner Building Little Rock Black History Monument https://deepwood.net/flag-and-banner-building-little-rock-black-history-monument/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 07:38:21 +0000 https://deepwood.net/flag-and-banner-building-little-rock-black-history-monument/ Two vacations with disparate roots collide this month in a historic building in Little Rock. Flag Day, an annual tribute to “The Star-Spangled Banner”, takes place today. Juneteenth, which celebrates the liberation of black Americans from slavery, is on the calendar Sunday and will be marked as a federal holiday Monday. Both occasions have links […]]]>

Two vacations with disparate roots collide this month in a historic building in Little Rock. Flag Day, an annual tribute to “The Star-Spangled Banner”, takes place today. Juneteenth, which celebrates the liberation of black Americans from slavery, is on the calendar Sunday and will be marked as a federal holiday Monday.

Both occasions have links to the three-story building at 800 W. Ninth St. Listed in 1982 on the National Register of Historic Places – it is now home to TheFlagandBanner.com. Known as Arkansas Flag & Banner, the company manufactures and sells American flags and patriotic badges as well as novelty banners. The besieged Ukraine flag, recently added to the inventory, is selling well.

Dedicated in 1918 as Taborian Temple and renamed Taborian Hall in the 1950s, the masonry structure was built by the black fraternal group Knights and Daughters of the Tabor. It has long served as an anchor for five business blocks. This stretch of Ninth Street was widely known as “The Line”, referring to the Jim Crow colored line that black Americans faced for many decades.

The hall’s first floor served in 1918 as an informal black soldiers’ club for black service members stationed at what was then called Camp Pike, but prohibited by segregation from base recreation facilities. During World War II, the three floors were converted into a USO club for black men at the renamed Camp Robinson as well as the Stuttgart Army Airfield.

Taborian Hall rose to fame beyond the black community after its Dreamland ballroom on the third floor opened in 1937. From then until the early 1960s, Dreamland hosted stars such as Billie Holiday, Dizzy Gillespie, Ella Fitzgerald, Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Nat “King” Cole, Fats Waller, Louis Jordan, Count Basie, Ray Charles, Otis Redding and BB King. Two other nightclubs operated on other floors of the building in the 1950s.

As “The Line” was eroded and then erased as social change was followed by the construction of Interstate-630, the clubs at Taborian Hall died out in 1970. The vacant building became a homeless shelter . A fire possibly started by a vagrant caused the roof to collapse, leaving the building under threat of condemnation and demolition.

It was purchased for renovation in 1992 by Kerry McCoy as the headquarters of her fledgling Arkansas Flag & Banner business, which she developed into a thriving business with a second outlet in Florida. She is determined to restore Dreamland Ballroom to some semblance of its former glory.

McCoy’s son, Matthew, leads Friends of Dreamland’s efforts to return the third-floor space to its former role as a social and entertainment venue. Funding for this ambitious project includes 2018 and 2020 grants totaling $999,391 from the U.S. Department of the Interior. One of the money’s goals is to bring the ballroom into compliance with the Americans With Disabilities Act.

In a brochure, Matthew notes that the challenges of reopening were daunting, “but the biggest hurdle for a business model was the unprofitable nature of the structure itself – a very large, old empty space on the third floor with no elevator no running water. “A portion of the federal funds was used to install an elevator.

A poster shows what part of a restored Dreamland Ballroom might look like. (Special for the Democrat-Gazette/Marcia Schnedler)
Adrienne McNally, the showroom manager, is happy to show visitors around Dreamland, taking the new elevator to the third floor. Partial roof repairs are evident, but air conditioning and heating are still lacking. Stripes of pink, shades of blue and other hues that brightened up the ballroom are still visible. Evidence of the venue’s use as a nightclub includes an industrial-grade corkscrew mounted on a counter.

Back on the first floor, the exhibit halls are filled with an array of flags, banners, and other patriotic merchandise appropriate for Flag Day and Independence Day. American flags for pole mounting come in 16 sizes, depending on the height of the pole, with the largest fluttering measuring 40 feet by 70 feet.

In addition to the national flag of Ukraine in various sizes, the store offers a novelty item “for a good laugh”. It’s a whoopee cushion emblazoned with Vladimir Putin’s face, priced at $15.99 – including $5 to help the Ukrainian Red Cross.

TheFlagandBanner.com (Flag and Banner of Arkansas)

  • Address: 800 W. Ninth St., Little Rock
  • Hours: 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday to Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.
  • Information: Visit theflagandbanner.com, or call (800) 445-0653. More details about Dreamland Ballroom can be found at dreamlandballroom.org or (501) 255-5700.
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Amid global warming, Bangladesh’s historic coastal mosques look to an uncertain future https://deepwood.net/amid-global-warming-bangladeshs-historic-coastal-mosques-look-to-an-uncertain-future/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/amid-global-warming-bangladeshs-historic-coastal-mosques-look-to-an-uncertain-future/ Since the 15th century, the “mosque city” of southern Bangladesh, dominated by the imposing brick Sixty Dome mosque, has been a place of pilgrimage for devout Bangladeshis and tourists alike. “I believe that if I wish for something and visit the mosque, Allah will grant my wish and I will see success in the future,” […]]]>

Since the 15th century, the “mosque city” of southern Bangladesh, dominated by the imposing brick Sixty Dome mosque, has been a place of pilgrimage for devout Bangladeshis and tourists alike.

“I believe that if I wish for something and visit the mosque, Allah will grant my wish and I will see success in the future,” said Shofik Ahamed, a university student who has explored the monument, a World Heritage Site. , during his recent Eid holiday.

But the Sixty Dome Mosque and a host of other medieval mosques, public buildings, tombs and cemeteries at the confluence of the estuary of the Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers face an increasingly uncertain future as the planet warms.

Climate change is bringing more extreme heat and rainfall, flooding, erosion and surges of salt water to Bangladesh’s southern delta, cut by hundreds of rivers.

Friends Asad Hossain and Monir Hossain visit the Sixty Dome Mosque site in Bagherhat, southern Bangladesh. Photo credit: Mosabber Hossain/Thomson Reuters Foundation

In the City of the Mosque, such changes undermine historic structures, causing the surface of aging bricks and masonry, for example, to disintegrate more quickly and allowing fungi and plants to take hold.

Stronger hurricanes and storm surges are also damaging structures, as is increasing saltwater intrusion through soil and air seeping into historic buildings, researchers say.

Sea level rise due to climate change “is a great threat to heritage sites”, warned Khandoker Mahfuz-ud-Darain, a professor at the University of Khulna who since 2017 has been studying these impacts on the cultural heritage of southern Bangladesh.

The threats to Mosque City are similar to those faced by around 127 protected archaeological sites – many of which are historic mosques – in coastal districts of Bangladesh.

The main entrance gate to the Sixty Dome Mosque, part of the City of Mosque, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Bagherhat, southern Bangladesh. Photo credit: Mosabber Hossain/Thomson Reuters Foundation

Already, at least 50 have been damaged by worsening climate impacts, said Afroza Khan, director of Khulna region for the Government of Bangladesh’s Department of Archeology..

Mahfuz-ud-Darain believes that by mid-century the impacts of climate change will be the main threat to the country’s heritage sites – and said planning should start now to protect them. As climate impacts intensify, “normal renovation will not work in these mosques,” he warned.

“The Biggest Threats”

The Mosque City of Bagerhat – formerly known as Khalifatabad – was founded by the Turkish general Ulugh Khan Jahan and flourished until his death in 1459.

Today, the mostly brick structures, restored at the turn of the last century after being abandoned and covered by jungle after Jahan’s death, offer some of the best examples of the Bengal Sultanate’s style of Muslim architecture.

Such monuments “represent the tradition of a country”, said Sufi Mostafizur Rahman, a professor in the department of archeology at Jahangirnagar University.

An interior view of the Sixty Dome Mosque in Bagherhat, southern Bangladesh. Photo credit: Mosabber Hossain/Thomson Reuters Foundation

But history is in danger in Bangladesh and around the world as global warming jeopardizes world heritage sites, from Venice’s frequently flooded St. Mark’s Square to statues threatened with erosion on Easter Island.

“Climate change is one of the greatest threats facing cultural and natural heritage sites worldwide”, with at least one in five monuments already under threat, said Thomas Mallard, spokesman for the World Heritage Centre. of UNESCO.

The UN agency is working with countries and communities that are home to heritage sites to build resilience to new pressures, he said. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization offers emergency funding to support disaster damage assessment and reconstruction.

These funds have already been used to carry out post-flood assessments and repair work in places ranging from Old Sana’a in Yemen to Sudan, where ancient buildings near the Nile were flooded in 2020. But Mahfuz-ud -Darain, who sits on the steering committee of the International Climate Heritage Network, said countries like Bangladesh also need to step up their own protection efforts.

It recommends increased funding for research into the impacts of climate on heritage and increased efforts to adapt historic structures to future changes, as well as to ensure that historic preservation efforts are part of a larger national climate policy. wide.

Khan, from the government’s Department of Archeology, said efforts were already underway this year to identify the most endangered coastal historic sites. The ministry has also proposed changes to the Antiquities Act that would make historic sites threatened or damaged by climate impacts eligible for state funding for protection and repairs.

Mohamed Helal Uddin, who for 30 years served as the imam of the Sixty Dome Mosque, hopes help will come soon, noting that damage to the historic building “would be a great loss for us”. Rahman, from Jahangirnagar University, agrees. “We have to save it for future generations,” he said.

This article first appeared on News from the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

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Catchy menu and ketchup in Collinsville https://deepwood.net/catchy-menu-and-ketchup-in-collinsville/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 00:22:35 +0000 https://deepwood.net/catchy-menu-and-ketchup-in-collinsville/ COLLINSVILLE – I had the opportunity to try the Old Herald Brewery and Distillery this week, and it was a perfect place to grab a light bite for a tour with the world’s largest bottle of ketchup. The locally owned Old Herald Brewery and Distillery, located at 115 E. Clay St., Collinsville, offers an extensive […]]]>

COLLINSVILLE – I had the opportunity to try the Old Herald Brewery and Distillery this week, and it was a perfect place to grab a light bite for a tour with the world’s largest bottle of ketchup.

The locally owned Old Herald Brewery and Distillery, located at 115 E. Clay St., Collinsville, offers an extensive menu of draft and craft beers, as well as a collection of tasty dishes with names any journalist would appreciate.

I ordered the Paper Route Pretzel, a freshly baked soft Bavarian pretzel served with horseradish mustard or beer cheese, of which I chose the latter. The beer cheese is homemade.


I also ordered the Front Page Style Flatbread Margherita which is a home baked flatbread topped with fresh basil, mozzarella cheese, roma tomatoes and drizzled with a balsamic reduction. Let me tell you, it’s delicious, easy to bite into, and loaded with basil, which I love, like basil pesto.

I also love summer salads, especially for dinner on a hot day after a bit of gardening. So I ordered two salads, one for later.

I had the apple craisin salad made with mixed greens, marinated roma tomatoes, red onion, feta cheese, cucumber and chimichurri dressing; and the pub salad, fresh greens, baby spinach, crumbled bacon, hard-boiled egg, limoncello-marinated onions, croutons, and bacon ranch dressing. I chose the latter for dinner.

Their current list of smartly named draft beers, which I’ll have to try next time, included Weekend Edition, a citrusy wheat hefeweizen; Backspace Brown, a light ale; Sports Page Light Lager, German style; The Story Gose, a sour fruit gose; Vienna Times Lager; Camera Ready, a farm beer season; late edition IPA; Printer’s Ink, a dark beer; and Miner’s Coalsch, a kölsch.

The Old Herald Brewery and Distillery is also an experience to revisit the history of the Collinsville Herald, as well as the city’s brewing and distilling past.

The Collinsville Herald was established in 1879 by James N. Peers, a photographer. The Herald’s first location was on South Chestnut Street. Peers ran the newspaper until 1906 when a group of businessmen bought it. The Herald’s second home was at the corner of Main and Morrison streets, which more recently housed Home Furnishings Co.

In 1917, James O. Monroe purchased the Herald, and in the first week took steps to bring it into the modern world by purchasing a linotype machine. Monroe moved the press company to Clay Street in 1924 and added another building in the 1930s.

Throughout its 100-year history, the newspaper has won numerous awards and played a vital role in the community. In 1985 the Herald was purchased by Suburban Journals and moved to Eastport Plaza.

The Old Herald Brewery and Distillery also offers craft distillery tours with thoughtful private event spaces celebrating the history of the paper and the city.

Take a day to tour Collinsville and stop at the world’s largest bottle of ketchup just three minutes from the Old Herald by car. Put the name World’s Largest Catsup Bottle in your Google maps and it will take you straight to the brewery.

The roadside architecture, which is actually a water tower, stands beside Illinois 159 just south of downtown Collinsville. The 170-foot tower was built in 1949 by WE Caldwell Co. for ketchup bottling plant GS Suppiger, who were bottlers of Brooks’ old original rich and tart ketchup.

In 1995, through the efforts of the Catsup Bottle Preservation Group, the historic roadside attraction was saved from demolition and beautifully restored to its original appearance. In August 2002, the world’s largest ketchup bottle was named to the National Register of Historic Places.

Recognized as a prime example of 20th-century roadside America, the world’s largest ketchup bottle regularly attracts national attention and attracts visitors. There is a handy little picnic table for enjoying delicious bites and thinking about history.

For more information, visit https://www.catsupbottle.com/history.html. To learn more about the Old Herald Brewery and Distillery, visit https://www.oldheraldbrewing.com/about/.

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New owners of historic Captain Searsport Searsport house reopen closed restaurant https://deepwood.net/new-owners-of-historic-captain-searsport-searsport-house-reopen-closed-restaurant/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/new-owners-of-historic-captain-searsport-searsport-house-reopen-closed-restaurant/ SEARSPORT, Maine — Inside the new Homeport Tavern last week was a blur of activity as owners prepared for opening night on Friday, June 17. With vendors passing by and a dining room still under renovation, there was plenty to do. But the little grand piano was already in place and a pot of okra […]]]>

SEARSPORT, Maine — Inside the new Homeport Tavern last week was a blur of activity as owners prepared for opening night on Friday, June 17.

With vendors passing by and a dining room still under renovation, there was plenty to do. But the little grand piano was already in place and a pot of okra was simmering on the stove, which seemed to match the emphasis on hospitality and good food that owners Arnaud Lessard, Allison Lessard and Kip Dixon have in head for the restaurant.

Arnaud Lessard, Allison Lessard and Kip Dixon are the owners of The Homeport Tavern, part of the Homeport Inn on East Main Street in Searsport. They are preparing for a soft opening which they hope to have later this month. Credit: Linda Coan O’Kresik / BDN

“We really want to have fun here. We want to bring live music and great food,” said Arnaud Lessard, 45. “It will not be a seasonal restaurant. It is a commitment to our future and to this city.

The Homeport Tavern, part of the Homeport Inn on East Main Street, is one of many new restaurants to open in Searsport over the past year, a sign of a restaurant boom in the small coastal town. He joins other newcomers including Rio’s Spiked Cafe, Hey Sailor! and Ras Dal Falafel.

Although in the recent past the seaside community has been overshadowed by its neighbor to the south, Belfast, Searsport is now having a moment – and it’s happy to be a part of it, says Arnaud Lessard.

“I think we have a huge push for travel tourism in Maine, and I think Searsport is really booming,” he said. “A lot of great things are happening here.”

The Lessards, who are married, and Dixon have a long history in the hospitality industry. They met while working at the same restaurant in Newburyport, Massachusetts, over 20 years ago. Dixon, 53, from Mobile, Alabama, is a chef. Allison Lessard, 49, who grew up in Farmington, Maine, has a degree in interior design and a background in project management. Arnaud Lessaurd has worked in hotel management for 25 years and was recently part of a team that opened The Whitney Hotel, a luxury boutique hotel on Boston’s Beacon Hill.

But the work they do at Searsport, on a captain’s mansion built in 1865 by Captain John P. Nichols, is different. The trio purchased the inn and tavern in February, after searching for property on the coast of Maine. The Italianate building, with an elaborate cupola, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983.

The Homeport Inn was open seasonally, with the previous owners trying to sell it for several years. The tavern – formerly the Mermaid Pub – had been closed for seven years.

A sign reads
The Homeport Tavern, a new Searsport restaurant, will offer year-round fine dining in a former sea captain’s house dating back to 1865. Credit: Linda Coan O’Kresik/BDN

As the new owners dug deeper into the project, they found water damage and a general feeling of benign neglect that they needed to address. One thing that didn’t bother them was the ghosts that supposedly haunt the inn. Despite the time they spent redeveloping the building, Arnaud Lessard says he felt no spirit.

Long working days have followed and in the past 13 weeks they have only taken three days off.

“It’s probably the hardest thing I’ve ever done in my life,” said Allison Lessard.

The results are worth it, they said.

“People say ‘it looks amazing’,” said Arnaud Lessard. “We are proud of all the work we have done. We recover floors that had four coats of paint and carpeted. We are just trying to bring back the beauty and charm of this building and hope it will be well received.

The Tavern is a cozy and welcoming space with a stone fireplace in the sitting area. The restaurant was originally built in the 1980s for a landlord who dreamed of opening an English-style pub, and the stonework, wall lights and inviting wooden bar all ring true to that dream.

The interior of a tavern with chairs and a fireplace.
The Homeport Tavern, a new Searsport restaurant, will offer year-round fine dining in a former sea captain’s house dating back to 1865. Credit: Linda Coan O’Kresik/BDN

“It’s a place where you can come and relax, escape and almost hide. It’s a refuge,” said Arnaud Lessard.

The separate dining room has a different appeal, with black painted walls and the aforementioned piano.

“The mood is black and brass and gold,” said Arnaud Lessard. “It really is simplicity in elegance.”

It’s a good backdrop for Dixon’s creations, which will incorporate both classic New England flavors and Louisiana Cajun-style favorites. There’s mouth-watering okra, a savory stew that serves as a satisfying postcard from its roots. But there will also be seasonal specialties like summer risotto and caprese burrata salad as well as sandwiches and burgers that will be on the menu every day. Other options will include bangers and mash and smoked ribs cut a la St. Louis, with most meats like bacon and pork belly cured and smoked on site.

Desserts can include specialties like bourbon praline bread pudding.

“I look forward to all the seafood here,” Dixon said. “I want to use as many local products as possible. I want to change it. I want to keep people surprised and excited.

He has been pleasantly surprised by the warm welcome he has found since moving to Maine in February.

The Homeport Tavern in Searsport. Credit: Linda Coan O’Kresik / BDN

“I love Maine so far. I’m completely in love with the hospitality here,” he said. “People are friendly. It’s a breath of fresh air.”

The Homeport Tavern dining room at 121 East Main St. in Searsport will be open from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. The bar will be open until 22:00 on these days. For more information, visit homeporthistoricinn.com or call 207-548-2259.

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Arson suspect in Morrow’s The District, $10,000 reward offered for information | New https://deepwood.net/arson-suspect-in-morrows-the-district-10000-reward-offered-for-information-new/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 00:24:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/arson-suspect-in-morrows-the-district-10000-reward-offered-for-information-new/ MORROW – Morrow Police are offering a $10,000 reward for information about the person or person suspected of burning down The District, formerly known as Olde Towne Morrow on Saturday morning. According to police, it took Morrow and Clayton County Fire Departments several hours to extinguish the blaze which spread to three historic homes on […]]]>

MORROW – Morrow Police are offering a $10,000 reward for information about the person or person suspected of burning down The District, formerly known as Olde Towne Morrow on Saturday morning.

According to police, it took Morrow and Clayton County Fire Departments several hours to extinguish the blaze which spread to three historic homes on the property. Acting Morrow Police Chief David Snively said the district was a frequent target of vandals.

“Our detectives have successfully identified several former offenders, including an attempted arson; and we will work tirelessly with fire investigators to determine the exact events surrounding this incident as well,” Snively said in a statement.

Morrow Fire Chief Roger Swint said the location and intensity of the fire were suspicious.

“Early indications suggest this fire was likely the result of arson or arson by one or more people.”

Swint requested assistance from the state fire marshal’s investigative unit, which will include the use of canines to determine the origin and cause of the fire.

City manager Jeff Baker said two of the buildings had been under contract and architectural plans were being reviewed for two others for commercial space.

He called the loss a devastating setback as well as a tragic loss of history referring to the Napier-Small House, an 1846 Greek Revival house listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

“This is a very sad day for our community,” Mayor John Lampl said.

He said the district has become an important community gathering space, home to many civic events and the site of several new businesses.

“The loss of these beautiful historic homes in the heart of our city is a huge blow to residents and community members who use this area,” Lampl said. “We mourn with our community and with the business owners who invested their dreams in this place; and we are committed to identifying and holding accountable anyone involved in the catastrophic damage caused by this fire.

The fire broke out around midnight on June 4. At approximately 8:45 p.m. on June 3, police said a group of individuals had been in the area of ​​The District.

Anyone with information about the fire or those seen around the location hours prior is asked to call the Morrow Police Department at 770-961-4006 or Georgia Arson Control at 1-800-282-5804 .

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Suspension bridge looks brighter with fresh coat of paint | News, Sports, Jobs https://deepwood.net/suspension-bridge-looks-brighter-with-fresh-coat-of-paint-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 06:05:03 +0000 https://deepwood.net/suspension-bridge-looks-brighter-with-fresh-coat-of-paint-news-sports-jobs/ WHEELING – Those who travel in and around the city of Wheeling have probably noticed the historic suspension bridge taking on a brighter new hue. The fresh paint job is part of the $17 million project to restore the bridge that spans the Ohio River between downtown and Wheeling Island. It has been […]]]>

WHEELING – Those who travel in and around the city of Wheeling have probably noticed the historic suspension bridge taking on a brighter new hue.

The fresh paint job is part of the $17 million project to restore the bridge that spans the Ohio River between downtown and Wheeling Island.

It has been many years since the bridge has been repainted. The wooden parts are painted red again, but with the new coat they now appear much bolder and brighter. The red color makes the bridge stand out even more, especially for motorists traveling on Interstate 70.

The cables will be painted white.

The old paint is removed via a more environmentally friendly method using a sponge blast. This method does not use water or air, but pieces of sponge. The tarps catch the pieces of sponge which can be vacuumed up, recycled and reused in the process.

Prior to paint application, a gray primer was used.

Structural work is also planned for the bridge which will begin in June or July.

The main cables of the bridge will remain, located on the downtown side, but new anchorages will be drilled for them.

Some steel work will be done on the bridge, but there is not much steel to replace.

The Wheeling Suspension Bridge was built in 1849 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. The span has a weight limit of 2 tons. In recent years, it has temporarily closed due to damage caused by oversized vehicles traveling there.

Over the years, some of the supporting cables have also broken, forcing temporary closures of the bridge. Finally, in September 2019, it was closed to all vehicle traffic. Until then, it was the oldest suspension bridge still in continuous use in the United States.

State Highway Division officials previously said it remains undetermined whether the bridge will reopen to vehicular traffic after the renovation.

The contractor hired to perform the renovation was Advantage Steel & Construction of Saxonburg, Pennsylvania. The painting contractor is 446 Painting of Canonsburg, Pennsylvania.



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