Historical Garden – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 05:24:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://deepwood.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2-150x150.png Historical Garden – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ 32 32 Fallen Fruit Collective is coming to Reno https://deepwood.net/fallen-fruit-collective-is-coming-to-reno/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 23:31:21 +0000 https://deepwood.net/fallen-fruit-collective-is-coming-to-reno/ OIn the Nevada Museum of Art’s online calendar of events, one of the most recent installations has an abnormally long date of September 1, 2022 to September 1, 2030. This is only an estimate though – fruit trees properly cared for will live much longer than just eight years. “Monument to Sharing” is a new […]]]>

OIn the Nevada Museum of Art’s online calendar of events, one of the most recent installations has an abnormally long date of September 1, 2022 to September 1, 2030. This is only an estimate though – fruit trees properly cared for will live much longer than just eight years.

“Monument to Sharing” is a new installation by artists David Allen Burns and Austin Young, who operate together as the Fallen Fruit Collective. The piece is made up of 21 fruit trees, various edible pollinating plants, and a patch of berries, and is currently installed at the Wilbur D. May Sculpture Plaza on the grounds of the Nevada Museum of Art.

Austin Young and David Allen Burns form the Fallen Fruit Collective. Photo: Kimberly Genevieve, courtesy Nevada Museum of Art

“It’s a sculpture garden, and we literally look at all the plants as sculptures — they happen to be alive,” Burns said. “And so the idea of ​​a monument is less about thinking that monuments should be a physical object that represents an idea or a name. And instead, what if a monument is an action or a gesture ?

Apparently, “Monument to Sharing” will look and function like an edible garden, with audiences encouraged to harvest whatever produce they wear, though the artists believe there won’t be any fruit for at least a few years. The artistic ethos behind the sculpture comes from examining themes of resource stewardship, community and how public space is used – ideas the Fallen Fruit Collective has spent nearly two decades exploring. in projects all over the world.

The collective, along with several community members from Victorville, California, installed the Fallen Fruit of Victorville Fruit Park in 2020. Photo courtesy of Nevada Museum of Art

“We started in 2004 by mapping fruit in public space in Los Angeles,” Young said. “We were just looking at this ignored resource that existed in the public space at the time. We started thinking about how to connect people in the community through this resource and thinking about public and private space and how we could use public space as a way to share resources. Sharing has therefore always been a central theme of our work.

This original work still exists as part of the endless orchard, an online collaboration that allows people to map publicly available fruit trees in their area. The Fallen Fruit Collective has since created other projects that use fruit plants to build community and encourage participation, such as “Urban Fruit Trails, Omaha” which used a network of apple trees to create a walking trail with encouraging bilingual signage. people to take the apples to maturity, or another iteration of “Monument to Share” in the Los Angeles State Historic Park – 32 orange trees in individual planters bearing quotes collected from people living in the surrounding neighborhood. members of the public are invited to help plant the trees, maintain them and share their fruits.

“Our work has always been about trust because public space is normally run by fear and fear of what people are going to do,” Young said. “We always want to turn that around and think, you know, we should trust each other and we can share.”

A living portrait

According to Burns, while each project may appear “chaotic and maximalist” in the end result, each plant and element of the sculpture is carefully chosen not just for its aesthetic appeal or ecological necessity, but seen through a local cultural and historical context. . For the NMA installation, the artists referenced the Indigenous heritage of Truckee Meadows and the history of European colonialism and trade.

“It’s a balance of select plants that are native to this Sierra Nevada and the coastal plains, kind of going across a few hundred miles,” Burns said. “And then that’s combined with things that have been brought here over the last two hundred years that are mostly European and some are Asian, so plums or quinces or pomegranates or figs. It’s about creating this kind of new way of seeing how plants could tell a story about Reno.

New in this episode, Neverthelessis the addition of edible pollinating plantssaid Burns, a tribute to the trail that once connected Reno to San Francisco.

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Fallen Fruit Collective often spends weeks or even months researching the town they are in building The artists read historical documents and, more often than not, just chat with the residents. In the case of NMA’s “Monument,” however, both artists had a pre-existing knowledge base.

“It’s kind of lucky that Austin was raised here,” Burns said. And Burns has visited Reno several times. The artists also sought advice from local expert Tom Stille of River School Farm.

The project also includes a written aspect in the form of Fallen Fruit Magazine – a collaborative collage made by community members that the artists will collect and print.

The artists invite the community to contribute to a related project, Fallen Fruit Magazine. They released previous releases in London, San Francisco, New Orleans, San Bernardino, and Charlotte. Image courtesy of Nevada Museum of Art.

“We create writing prompts,” Burns said. “Like, we talk about myths and legends, and then we just say, ‘When I was a kid, period, period, period. But what they are, more than anything, is hopefully summoning someone to feel compelled to share something personal about Reno. We’re less interested in a simple fact, but like a poem would be cool, or something you’d hear in a coffee shop.

Attendees of the museum’s first Thursday event on September 1 were invited to contribute to the collage. The invitation will continue on First Thursdays for the next six months.

NMA Director of Communications and Marketing Rebecca Eckland participates in the Fallen Fruit Magazine project at the event on the first Thursday of September 1. Photo: Matt Bieker

Much of the Collective’s association with the NMA is a long-term one. “Monument to Sharing” is considered a permanent installation, and in fact, it is expected to produce its first batch of fruit in 2025, when the museum’s 50,000 square foot expansion is set to open.

Burns and Young hope to have most of the plants installed by the end of October. After that, it will be up to museum patrons and passers-by to decide how the resources will be distributed, whether there is enough for everyone, and what a single piece of food can mean to whoever receives it.

“The fruit is always political,” Burns said. “You could come to the museum and instead of just seeing something and telling your family or friends about it, you could leave the museum and say, ‘I’m going to pick out a few items and then do something with them. So that the ideas you learned at the museum will revive because you only have a handful of rosemary. The rosemary has nothing to do with what you saw upstairs, but now they’re connected. »

Fallen Fruit Collective”Monument to Sharingcan be viewed indefinitely on the grounds of the Nevada Museum of Art.

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Reservations are open for the Historical Society’s Fall Picnic https://deepwood.net/reservations-are-open-for-the-historical-societys-fall-picnic/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 14:42:56 +0000 https://deepwood.net/reservations-are-open-for-the-historical-societys-fall-picnic/ Reservations are open through September 28 for the 2022 Finney County Historical Society Fall Picnic. The annual indoor picnic is scheduled for 1 p.m. Oct. 2 in the Grandstand Assembly Hall at the Finney County Fairgrounds in Garden City, with a presentation by Kristi Newland, Zoo Director Lee Richardson. Newland will focus on the history […]]]>

Reservations are open through September 28 for the 2022 Finney County Historical Society Fall Picnic.

The annual indoor picnic is scheduled for 1 p.m. Oct. 2 in the Grandstand Assembly Hall at the Finney County Fairgrounds in Garden City, with a presentation by Kristi Newland, Zoo Director Lee Richardson.

Newland will focus on the history of Garden City’s popular 95-year-old zoological attraction.

The public is invited to join FCHS members at the event. Admission is free but reservations are required by September 28.

The number to call is 620-272-3664 and reservations can also be made in person at the Finney County Museum, 403 S. Fourth Street, where exhibit hours are 1-5 p.m. daily.

Anyone planning to attend is asked to bring a side dish, salad or dessert to share. Fried chicken, drinks and table service will be offered.

The zoo and the museum are separate entities but are located together. Newland was chosen as the presenter as the zoo celebrates its 95th anniversary.

The zoo was started in 1927 by the city and local chapter of the Izaak Walton League, with two skunks brought in by Lee Richardson, who served as Garden City’s first police chief. The zoo was officially named in honor of Richardson in 1950, a year before his death.

The Sunday picnic will conclude with a donation raffle, offering cash and merchandise prizes donated by a number of businesses, individuals, families and organizations.

Tickets for the raffle will be available at the event and through invitations sent to members of the society.

Proceeds will be used to support museum exhibits and programs. The presale of raffle tickets is also underway at the museum at $1 each, six at $5, or 12 at $10.

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Archtober, the New York architecture festival, returns for its twelfth year | New https://deepwood.net/archtober-the-new-york-architecture-festival-returns-for-its-twelfth-year-new/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 17:05:03 +0000 https://deepwood.net/archtober-the-new-york-architecture-festival-returns-for-its-twelfth-year-new/ This post is brought to you by Archtober 2022 Archtober, the month-long architecture and design festival, returns to New York this year. Organized by the Architecture Center in collaboration with partners and sponsors across the city, the 2022 edition of the festival will bring together events, exhibits, resources and activities in all five boroughs. Despite […]]]>

This post is brought to you by Archtober 2022

Archtober, the month-long architecture and design festival, returns to New York this year. Organized by the Architecture Center in collaboration with partners and sponsors across the city, the 2022 edition of the festival will bring together events, exhibits, resources and activities in all five boroughs. Despite the challenges of recent years, Archtober has continued to grow, bringing together this year more than 100 partners and sponsors to celebrate the importance of architecture and design in New York. New this year: the Archtober guide on Bloomberg Connects, the free arts and culture app!

Front and York by Morris Adjmi Architects. Image © Selvon Ramsawak/Courtesy of Archtober.

“As Archtober celebrates its twelfth year, I’m thrilled to see how the festival continues to grow, with over 100 collaborating partners and new program offerings,” said Benjamin Prosky, Assoc. AIA, Executive Director, AIA New York | Architecture Center. “This year, the festival seems particularly relevant as we celebrate the reopening of the city. Archtober 2022 offers many opportunities for in-person experiences, including our ever-popular Building of the Day series, founded on the principle that architecture should be experienced first-hand. Conversely, we have not abandoned some of the benefits of digital programming, including through a series of virtual Indigenous design discussions developed with Indigenous planning and architectural design researchers. Finally, we’re excited to launch a new collaboration with Bloomberg Connects to create an Archtober mobile experience that makes accessible a selection of today’s buildings we’ve visited over the years.

2022 Program Offerings

Archtober 2022 will continue to offer a combination of in-person and virtual programming, allowing partners to welcome audiences back to their spaces while taking advantage of broader online networks.

Several partners will offer their conferences in virtual or hybrid formats to welcome even larger and international audiences, including the CCNY Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of ArchitectureSciame Fall 2022 Lecture Series, “Border Crossings: Architecture and Migration in the Americas.” This year, Archtober has also partnered with the Indigenous Society of Architecture, Planning, and Design on a special four-part virtual series, “In the Realm of Indigenous Architectures,” which will explore the preservation and transformation of Indigenous communities in United States. states.

Espace T. Image © Paul Warchol (2021)/Courtesy of Archtober.

The festival will also feature several exhibitions across the city, including The Curiosities of Mr. Pergolesi from Cooper Hewitt: Ornament in Eighteenth-Century Britainopening October 1, and
modern Art Museumit is Life between buildings, an exploration of how artists have invested the interstitial spaces of the city. Further on, don’t miss the site-specific facilities for Robert Stadler: Reading Date to Tight Where Brochure Architecture at Space ‘T’presenting the theoretical explorations of emerging architects.

For 2022, the popular “Building of the day” the series of guided tours by architects will take place entirely in person. By popular demand, this year’s series will include two different building tours on Saturdays, allowing the festival to reach a wider audience over the weekend. This year’s selection of tours includes:

  • 9 decalb in Brooklyn by Architects SHOP

  • The Living Breakwaters Project to Staten Island by SCAPE, offered in collaboration with

    New York Open House aboard a Circle Line ship

  • Pier 57 in Manhattan by Diller Scofidio and Renfro, Handel Architectsand !melk

  • The peninsula in the Bronx by WXY and Elizabeth Kennedy landscape architect

  • Queens Public Library Steinway Branch renovation by Studio Mario Gooden

Grand Designs Architecture at Green-Wood Cemetery. Image courtesy of Archtober.

Several Archtober partners will also be offering tours outside of the festival’s Building of the Day series. October 2, Green Wood Cemetery will lead”Grand Designs: Architecture in Green-Wood”, exploring the monuments and mausoleums of the cemetery by the greatest architects and artists of the 19th century, and NYPL‘s Seward Park Branch will guide attendees through a
Manhattan Chinatown Tour October 29. 2022 also marks New York Open House20th anniversary, join the urban exploration party from October 21 to 23!

Pumpkitecture at the Center for Architecture. Image © Sam Lahoz/Courtesy of Archtober.

No October celebration is complete without some end-of-the-month scares, and Archtober is no exception! On October 28, pumpkitecture will return to the Center for Architecture, as architects go bottle by bottle to compete for the Pritzkerpumpkin. Families can also have fun with Merchant’s House Museum Candlelight Ghost ToursManhattan’s most haunted house, the New York Botanical Garden’s Halloween in the garden extravagance, and
The spooky scavenger hunt at the Lewis Lattimer House Museum.

Beyond timed and paid activities, the Archtober site will again include “Activities at any time,” an evergreen resource section for architecture enthusiasts of all ages. The Architecture Center “architecture at home” resources and thedesign it yourselfprovides families with simple, downloadable instructions for DIY activities. Podcast enthusiasts can also delve into the “New Angle: Voice,”focusing on the untold stories of women architects, or the Queens Public Library”Queens Memory Projectwhich uses the library’s oral history archives to tell stories about the borough’s past.

Panorama of the Queens Museum. Image © Max Touhey for the Queens Museum/Courtesy of Archtober.

And don’t forget to check out our Archtober’s Map of New York, available through Glide. See the city through the eyes of an architect while being directed to nearby architectural sites, cultural institutions and parks (as well as places to stop for a drink or a snack!) that help define New York as one of the nation’s most challenging design arenas. While visiting our website, stop by the festival Archtober shopwhich offers several items, from t-shirts and baseball caps, to fanny packs and even socks, so you can explore the city in style.

New This Year: Check Out Today’s Archtober Buildings on Bloomberg Connects

At its core, the Archtober Festival aims to encourage and inspire the public to engage with the architecture and design around them. Building on our efforts to create Archtober experiences throughout the year, this year the festival has partnered with Bloomberg connectsthe free artistic and cultural application created by Bloomberg Philanthropies, to develop the Archtober Guide. Over the past 12 years, Archtober has visited hundreds of projects in all five boroughs. The Archtober Guide on Bloomberg Connects lets you explore a selection of these sites from your phone and dive into some of New York’s most exciting contemporary and historic projects. View images of the project and listen to exclusive, app-only interviews with the architects and landscape designers shaping New York’s future!

Brooklyn Botanical Garden exhibit, “For Birds, Forage Materials for Foraging Birds” by Peterson Rich Office. Image courtesy of Archtober.

Buildings featured include the Judd Foundation by Architecture Research Office, Weeksville Heritage Center by Caples Jefferson Architects, DSNY Manhattan Districts 1/2/5 Garage & Spring Street Salt Shed by Dattner Architects and WXY, and Hunters Point South by SWA/Balsley and WEISS/MANFREDI. You can also use Bloomberg Connects to explore Archtober’s partners including Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Judd Foundation, Museum of Jewish Heritage, Museum of the City of New York, Neue Galerie New York, New York Botanical Garden , the New York Public Library. , and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

The Archtober guide to Bloomberg Connects will launch on September 16, 2022.

Visit our website to see our lineup of events for 2022 starting at September 14, 2022.

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10 TV shows to inspire your next TTRPG campaign https://deepwood.net/10-tv-shows-to-inspire-your-next-ttrpg-campaign/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 00:15:57 +0000 https://deepwood.net/10-tv-shows-to-inspire-your-next-ttrpg-campaign/ Gamemasters for tabletop role-playing games, or TTRPGs, are at the heart of most gaming groups. It is their creativity and planning that fuels the world players explore and the adventures they embark on. However, just because the game master can develop the campaign independently doesn’t mean they have to. RELATED: 10 Graphic Novels For Kids […]]]>

Gamemasters for tabletop role-playing games, or TTRPGs, are at the heart of most gaming groups. It is their creativity and planning that fuels the world players explore and the adventures they embark on. However, just because the game master can develop the campaign independently doesn’t mean they have to.


RELATED: 10 Graphic Novels For Kids To Inspire Your Next TTRPG CampaignWriters and other content creators have always drawn inspiration from the stories they love, even in the story. Gamemasters can adapt media elements that they and their players enjoy as inspiration for their campaigns. Some of the most popular media for tabletop games are TV shows.

ten Squid Game: Squeeze Into A Death Challenge

While adventurers and other TTRPG characters are often much better off than competitors in squid game, they can still be pressured by external forces. For example, a campaign inspired by the series might see player characters forced into a series of death games in order to gain something they need.

This prize can be a specific item, the approval of a powerful NPC, or another rare resource. If the challenge allowed only one winner, players would have to attempt a coup or sacrifice their compatriots to achieve their goals.

9 The Good Place: Set A Game In The Afterlife

Death is often the most serious consequence for player characters in a TTRPG campaign. In a game inspired by The right place, death would indeed be behind them. Instead, the question that hangs in the balance is the fate of their eternal and immortal souls.

RELATED: 10 Best Tabletop RPGs Everyone Should Play At Least OnceThe gamemaster could develop their concept for the afterlife and its idiosyncrasies, and then determine what problems players have to deal with within that framework. They could have been sent into the evil afterlife entirely, intercepted by a usurping death deity, or found themselves at the end of undeserved wrath and judgment.

8 Midnight Mass: Confronting Horror and Tragedy Head-On

Netflix’s 2021 Miniseries Midnight Mass tackles the concepts of mistaken belief, horror and inevitable tragedy through the view of a small town overrun by vampires. This series would provide fascinating inspiration for horror-specific TTRPGs like Fear Where ten candlesemphasizing the fatality of the characters’ defeat.

Instead of being an epic tale of how heroes succeeded and survived through thick and thin, this campaign would center on the question of what ordinary people can achieve in the face of effectively unavoidable defeat.

seven Bee and puppy: a few steps from normality

One of the most emblematic elements of bee and puppy, both the original YouTube series and the current Netflix reboot, is the setting. Bee’s world is very similar to that of real-world viewers, but it’s only a few steps away. As a result, everything is a little more fantastical, a little less realistic, and a little adorable.

An inspired campaign bee and puppy could implement this idea with a similar setting, mirroring reality but making everything slightly more wonderful and weird.

6 Our flag means death: irreverence on the high seas

Fans loved the recent HBO Max series Our flag means death for his irreverent and whimsical take on historical histories of piracy. TTRPGs have often ventured into the realm of the high seas, but could do so with a new perspective inspired by Our flag means death.

Each player could take on the role of a famous pirate from history or the history of the game world, depending on the setting. They could then come together in an eccentric and anachronistic adventure through the historical stories of these characters.

In Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood and its adjacent adaptations of the same source material, the powerful magic of alchemy has been completely normalized. It is considered a skill like any other, integrated into government and military positions.

RELATED: 10 Fun TTRPG Genres That Aren’t Fantasy (And The Best Game Of Each)

A campaign inspired by the show could take the same attitude, where the sense of wonder surrounding magic has completely diminished in favor of a specialized skill, like quantum physics or neurosurgery. Players can be members of the military institution, government, or even a rebellion fighting to expose corruption in the system.

4 Over the garden wall: the party is lost

While many fantasy TTRPG campaigns view the party as members of that society who understand its ins and outs, there is another way to go. In Over the garden wall, the two main protagonists are lost in a world beyond their comprehension. It certainly bears some similarities to the world they left behind, but not enough to make them feel comfortable or knowledgeable.

A campaign inspired by this series would see the player characters on a journey through a world they know nothing about but don’t question too much.

3 Helpless: Life Outside the Main Story

Although several factors have led to its limited circulation, Powerless started with a great premise: a glimpse into the lives of ordinary people in an extraordinary world. Powerless focused on the lives of a group of civilians in the DC Comics Universe as they attempt to navigate life surrounded by super-powered heroes and villains.

This concept could lend itself well to a TTRPG campaign, where players assume the role of ordinary citizens who are swept away by the peripheral events of the powerful characters whose stories unfold around them.

2 Adventure Time: Classic fantasy with chaotic humor

adventure time surprisingly resembles a classic high-fantasy TTRPG campaign in terms of basic building blocks. However, it takes all the details and twists them through a humorous lens of the cartoon world, making the end result beautifully chaotic and whimsical.

RELATED: Top 10 TTRPGs For Fantasy Fans

For gaming tables that love high fantasy games but are tired of typical tropes, a Adventure time-an inspired campaign could bring a weird and refreshing tone to their adventures and make the old favorite feel new again. Additionally, chaos suits the aggressively unbalanced attitude adopted by many TTRPG groups.

1 She-Ra and the Princesses of Power: High Fantasy Meets Space and Playful Aesthetics

She-Ra and the Princesses of Power Already looks like a TTRPG campaign in a number of ways, so it would work well as an inspiration for one. While the colorful and vibrant visuals are maintained throughout the series, the stakes steadily rise, just as they do with long-running campaigns, as characters level up.

The show also seamlessly integrates high-fantasy concepts with cutting-edge technology and space travel, steadily introducing detail over time. The world of Etheria could inspire beautiful narrative campaigns.

NEXT: Top 10 TTRPGs That Require No Prep

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Community Calendar | News, Sports, Jobs https://deepwood.net/community-calendar-news-sports-jobs/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 06:05:01 +0000 https://deepwood.net/community-calendar-news-sports-jobs/ TUE/9-13 Beloit Youngstown Public Library and pop-up Mahoning County Library, 1:30 p.m., Beloit Recycling Center Boardman DARE, pétanque at Boardman Park, 5:30 p.m.; 330-729-0127 Central Canton Board meeting, 7 p.m. (postponed to September 14) Colombian School board, 6 p.m., high school media library Columbiana Planning Commission, 7 p.m., Town Hall; Zoom link on […]]]>

TUE/9-13

Beloit

Youngstown Public Library and pop-up Mahoning County Library, 1:30 p.m., Beloit Recycling Center

Boardman

DARE, pétanque at Boardman Park, 5:30 p.m.; 330-729-0127

Central Canton

Board meeting, 7 p.m. (postponed to September 14)

Colombian

School board, 6 p.m., high school media library

Columbiana Planning Commission, 7 p.m., Town Hall; Zoom link on columbianaohio.gov

East of Liverpool

Needles and Hooks (crochet and knitting group), 12 p.m. to 2 p.m., Carnegie Public Library Community Room

Eastern Palestine

Eastern Palestine Library, 1 p.m. Budding Library Worm Storytime, 2 p.m. Local History Hunters. Job Prep, 1-3 p.m. Meeting of Friends of the Library, 7 p.m.

Eagles kitchen open from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.; meatloaf, mashed potatoes and vegetables; $9; 330-886-0397

Our Lady of Lourdes dinner at the wheel, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. or while seats last. Meatloaf, gratin dauphinois, green beans, applesauce and dessert, $10.

Township of Knox

Board of Directors, 4.30 p.m., administrative building; special meeting to review and possibly award the contract

Lisbon

Columbiana County Automatic Data Processing Commission, 10:00 a.m., Auditors’ Conference Room

DAHS Class of 1956, Belleria in Columbiana, 11 a.m.

Columbiana County Veterans Services Commission, 1 p.m., Veterans Services Office

Municipal Council, 6.30 p.m., village hall; EPS at 5 p.m.

Salem

Salem Hospital Retirees, Adele’s, 10 a.m.

Rotary Club of Salem, noon, Salem Community Center

Parkinson’s Support Group, 1 p.m., Emmanuel Lutheran Church

Adult Book Talk, Salem Public Library, 2 p.m. in the Reading Room. “Steal Lincoln’s Body” by Thomas Craughwell. Registration is not required for this free program. The adult book discussion is open to the public.

Salem Hunting Club, open to the public, trap shooting 6 p.m.

Families Anonymous, 7 p.m., First United Methodist Church Café

Salem Italian American Club meeting, 7 p.m.

Salem Historical Society meeting, 7 p.m., Shaffer Library; program will be Kenneth Conklin on “Story of Harriet Taylor Upton, American Political Activist”

Township of Salem

Salem Township Trustee Meeting, 7:00 p.m., Salem Township Administration Building

Salineville

Local School Board of the South, 5:30 p.m., secondary media library

Sebring

Family Storytime, 4:30 p.m., Sebring Library

Wellsville

Wellsville Library Storytime for school-aged children 4 p.m.

Yellow Creek Township

Board of directors, 7 p.m., town hall

WED/9-14

Beloit

West Branch School Board, 5 p.m., Knox Elementary; followed by a public meeting with presentation of the levy

Central Canton

Directors meeting canceled

County

Local Singles, Old Towne Country Grill in Leetonia, 6 p.m.

East of Liverpool

East Liverpool – Fawcett Community Foundation Annual Meeting, 4 p.m., Jackman S. Vodrey Offices, 517 Broadway, 3rd Floor; directors will consider making the 2022 grants after the meeting

Eastern Palestine

The Way Station/Kingdom Kloset, Presbyterian Church, 109 W. Rebecca St., 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

East Palestine Library, Budding Bookworms Storytime, 10 a.m. Author Karen Kotrba, 6 p.m.

Hanover

United Local school board, 6 p.m., high school library

Lisbon

Lepper Library Storytime, 11 a.m.; open to children from babies to kindergarten; includes reading, rhymes and activities; Froggy goes to the library and AZ apples; register at the loan office or at 330-424-3117

DAHS Class of 1959, Pizza Night, High Hill, Noon

School Board, 5 p.m., School Board Conference Room

Lisbon Lions Club, 6:30 p.m.

Administrators of the Canton du Centre, 7 p.m.

New Cumberland

Hancock County School Board, 5:30 p.m., JDR IV Career Center; special meeting for discussion and possible action of superintendent’s goals

New Waterford

Crestview School Board, 6 p.m., high school cafeteria

Salem

Class of 1956, 11:30 a.m., Ezio’s

Drive-Through Flu Clinic, 1-3 p.m., Salem Area Visiting Nurse Association, 718 E. Third St.; $30 cash or check only; information at 330-332-9986

Salem Hunting Club, Open to the Public, Bench Shooting Competition .22 5 p.m.

Salem HS Class Dinner, 6 p.m., Deck at BB Rooners

Salem Public Library Wellness Wednesday Program with Sound Therapy, 6:30 p.m., Quaker Room; register at www.salempubliclibrary.org or 330-332-0042

Salem Area Garden Club, 7 p.m., Smucker House; guest speaker Wild City Feed and Seed

Wellsville

Buckeye Water District Finance Committee, 10 a.m., BWD Office

Wellsville Library Lego Club 4-5pm

Baked Steak Dinner, Yellow Creek Presbyterian Church, 4-6:30 p.m., Baked Steak, Mashed Potatoes and Gravy, Green Beans, Coleslaw, Dessert. $9. Sit or perform.

THU/9-15

Boardman

Workforce Development Board Inc. Mahoning and Columbiana Counties Executive Committee, Noon, OhioMeansJob Mahoning County

Chester

Railroaders’ Breakfast, 11 a.m., EJ’s Restaurant; information, Rocco at 330-853-3045

Damascus

Tops 1329, United Methodist Church, 9 a.m. weigh-in, 9:30 a.m. meeting

East of Liverpool

Ceramics Museum Debate “The hallway,” 6:30 p.m.; featuring former Hall China employees; Free and open to the public; doors open at 6 p.m.

Eastern Palestine

The Way Station/Kingdom Kloset, Presbyterian Church, 109 W. Rebecca St., 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

East Palestine Library, Afternoon Book Club, 1:30 p.m. Pajama Party with Stuffed Animals, 6 p.m.

Eagles kitchen open from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.; cheese ravioli, side salad and roll; $9; 330-886-0397

Eagles Bingo, 6:45 p.m.

Planning Commission, 7 p.m., municipal building

Lisbon

Cemetery Council, 9 a.m., chapel

Annual Columbiana County Auditor’s Sale, 10 a.m., Commissioner’s Conference Room at the Columbiana County Courthouse; list of properties and policies available at http://oh-columbiana-auditor.publicaccessnow.com/ under the Links tab

New Waterford

Eagles Wing Nite, 4 p.m. to 9 p.m., with full menu, dine in or take out, 330-457-7230

Salem

Salem Community Pantry, 3-6 p.m., food distribution for residents of ZIP code 44460; proof of residency required; use the garage door entrance on the Vine Street side of the building

Salem Public Utilities Commission meeting, 4 p.m., City Council Chambers.

Salem Hunting Club, Open to the Public, Concealed Carry and Steel Challenge, Timed Pistol Shooting Contest 6 p.m.

Salem Area Garden Club, 7:00 p.m., The Smucker House, 271 S. Broadway Ave. Program: Come and discover how to attract the birds of your choice to your flower and vegetable gardens. Public reception

Salineville

Dinner on the Hill, 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Bethel Presbyterian Church

Wellsville

Buckeye Water District Board of Directors, 9 a.m., Wellsville Community Hall

Wellsville Library Family Story Time 11 a.m.




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Historic Homes You Can Own in the Missoula and Western Montana Area | Local News https://deepwood.net/historic-homes-you-can-own-in-the-missoula-and-western-montana-area-local-news/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 15:30:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/historic-homes-you-can-own-in-the-missoula-and-western-montana-area-local-news/ Welcome to 1700 Madeline Avenue, a stunning home in the highly desirable University District, located at the base of Sentinel Mountain. Totaling more than 3,000 m². Ft., this charming historic 5-bedroom, 3-bathroom home has been lovingly remodeled with a great blend of modern updates and old-world charm. The property is situated on 2 parcels, totaling […]]]>

Welcome to 1700 Madeline Avenue, a stunning home in the highly desirable University District, located at the base of Sentinel Mountain. Totaling more than 3,000 m². Ft., this charming historic 5-bedroom, 3-bathroom home has been lovingly remodeled with a great blend of modern updates and old-world charm. The property is situated on 2 parcels, totaling 0.27 acres, providing plenty of space for outdoor activities and gatherings. You’ll love this charismatic and spacious home with a beautiful yard nestled among the trees. This house has lots of character with exposed beams and woodwork throughout. Recent upgrades include new exterior paint and a new roof, as well as a new main sewer connection. Upstairs you will find the master suite with a fully renovated bathroom and a stacked washer/dryer in the bedroom. The basement has its own separate entrance and features 2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, living room, laundry room and space used as a kitchenette – perfect for guests or as an income generating rental. The backyard is an oasis with extensive landscaping, with a large deck for entertaining and even a small playhouse for children. Within walking distance of the University of Montana and close to downtown, this property offers the perfect destination to experience the best of Missoula.

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Seed Saving 101 – Isthmus https://deepwood.net/seed-saving-101-isthmus/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 00:49:51 +0000 https://deepwood.net/seed-saving-101-isthmus/ press release: Have you ever wanted to save the seeds of your hard-earned harvest, but didn’t know where to start? Want to carry over your bumper harvest of Driftless-acclimated cucumbers and peppers into a new season? On Saturday, October 1 at 11:00 a.m., the Driftless Seed Project is partnering with Back Home Farm of Blue […]]]>

press release: Have you ever wanted to save the seeds of your hard-earned harvest, but didn’t know where to start? Want to carry over your bumper harvest of Driftless-acclimated cucumbers and peppers into a new season?

On Saturday, October 1 at 11:00 a.m., the Driftless Seed Project is partnering with Back Home Farm of Blue Mounds to offer a free introductory workshop on saving and storing seeds, followed by a tour of Doug’s organic family farm. and Karin Butikofer. Up to thirty registrants will learn the basics of the centuries-old tradition of harvesting and storing seeds of edible plants from an experienced team of growers and naturalists.

The workshop and the visit are free, but registration is compulsory for a maximum of thirty participants. To register, go to www.mthorebhistory.org and search for “farm tour”, or call 608-437-6486.

Back Home Farm comprises an eight-acre parcel of drift-free land, with two acres currently in active production. The property also has 1.5 acres of woodland, an open meadow, an orchard of ancient fruit trees, a small vineyard of cold hardy grapes and an apiary using natural beekeeping practices. Here, Butikofer produces non-GMO, open-pollinated and heirloom seed varieties.

This program is presented by the Driftless Seed Project, an initiative of Back Home Farm (Blue Mounds, WI), Mount Horeb Area Community Garden, Mount Horeb Area Historical Society and naturalist/educator Catherine Young. The Driftless Seed Project aims to educate about the intersection of sustainable agriculture and cultural heritage, by identifying and sharing locally grown seeds and their stories from the Driftless region of southwestern Wisconsin.

For more information, call 608-437-6486 or email mthorebahs@gmail.com.

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cheshireherald.com – Senior Center Programs https://deepwood.net/cheshireherald-com-senior-center-programs/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 05:09:46 +0000 https://deepwood.net/cheshireherald-com-senior-center-programs/ For a full schedule of programs offered by the Cheshire Public Library, 104 Main St., and to register for those listed below, visit www.cheshirelibrary.org. Open art studio – Fridays, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., at the Loft, upper level. Bring your work in progress and supplies to this weekly art program, an opportunity to […]]]>

For a full schedule of programs offered by the Cheshire Public Library, 104 Main St., and to register for those listed below, visit www.cheshirelibrary.org.

Open art studio – Fridays, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., at the Loft, upper level. Bring your work in progress and supplies to this weekly art program, an opportunity to create in a collaborative environment with other artists. No formal instruction will be provided, but informal critique for those who wish is encouraged. Table covers will be provided and there is a sink in the room for basic cleaning. Please do not bring turpentine.

Art Diary with Megan Jeffery – Today, September 8, from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Loft, upper level. Learn how you can start documenting your life with art journaling in this engaging workshop led by passionate illustrator and journalist Megan Jeffery, who will show examples of the wide variety of art journals she has created over the years. years, like “fauxbonichi”, sticks unwanted books, newspapers, and more. Attendees will create their own journaling cards using a variety of supplies, with lots of samples and ideas shared to let your creativity run free! This mini-workshop will provide a taste of Megan’s next seven-week class at Artsplace, “So Many Journals”, which begins September 22. Visit www.artsplacecheshirect.org for more information.

Adult Loft Knitters – Wednesday, September 14, from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Loft, upper level. Socialize, learn and share techniques with other knitters and discover the relaxing and soothing effect of knitting. All levels of adult knitters are welcome. Please bring your own yarn and knitting needles. Crocheters are welcome.

Murder by the Book Mystery Book Club – “The Lost Apothecary” (online) – Thursday, September 15, from 1 p.m. to 2:15 p.m. Attention time change: 1 p.m. instead of 2 p.m. Participate in monthly book discussions for new perspectives, new authors and a friendly atmosphere. The club is meeting virtually via Zoom for the time being. Sarah Penner’s “The Lost Apothecary” is a thrilling work of mystery, murder, trust and betrayal. Set in atmospheric London and filled with fascinating historical detail, this skillful and gripping first novel celebrates the strength of women across the centuries. Penner’s immersive story flows deftly from past to present, revealing the heartaches and lost dreams of three captivating main characters in a tense drama that turns the page and surprises until the last paragraph. Thanks to Friends of Cheshire Library, multiple copies of the e-book will be available for download to a smartphone, Kindle, iPad or computer via Overdrive/Libby until September 15. An up-to-date Cheshire Library card is required. . Murder by the Book’s host is Barbara Ritchie, who can be reached at baritchie30@gmail.com. Please register online.

Here is what the group will read next:

October 20: “The Man Who Died Twice” by Richard Osman

November 17: “Death of the Green-Eyed Monster” by MC Beaton

Murder by the Book will skip December and start again in January.

Author Conference: “The Human Gardener” – Thursday, September 15, 6:30-8 p.m. Join author Nancy Lawson as a special guest speaker in an online presentation. His book, “The Humane Gardener: Nurturing a Backyard Habitat for Wildlife,” explains the importance of coexisting with local wildlife. Lawson lays out a plan to accomplish what others have said is impossible: how to incorporate native plants into the landscape for the benefit of humans and wildlife. Sponsored by the Cheshire Pollinator Pathway and made possible by a grant from the Claire C. Bennitt Watershed Fund. Lawson is a habitat consultant and national speaker on garden ecology. She founded Humane Gardener to pioneer creative planting strategies and other animal-friendly landscaping methods. Lawson’s presentations, from national wildlife refuges to local wildflower preserves, have earned him accolades and inspired even the most seasoned horticulturists and wildlife experts to look at their landscapes in new ways. Certified as a Chesapeake Bay Landscape Professional and Master Naturalist, she partners with conservation and animal advocacy organizations in central Maryland. His book and his garden have been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Postand other media.

Many Stories Book Club: “Detransition, Baby” – Thursday, September 15, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., at the Loft, upper level. This monthly book club explores diverse identities, experiences and perspectives through the power of stories. “Detransition, Baby” is a novel by Torrey Peters in which a trans woman, her detransitioned ex, and her cisgender lover together build an unconventional family in the wake of heartbreak and an unplanned pregnancy. Registration is mandatory.

Art League Book Club: “Nefertiti” – Friday, September 16, from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Loft, upper level. Do you like reading? And do you like art? Let’s talk! This month, the Art League Book Club will discuss Michelle Moran’s “Nefertiti” and explore the art of ancient Egypt. This meeting will be moderated by Carol Constantino, member of the Cheshire Art League. Thanks to Friends of Cheshire Library, multiple copies of the e-book will be available for download to a smartphone, Kindle, iPad or computer via Overdrive/Libby until September 15. An up-to-date Cheshire Library card is required. .

The mystery of the ancient tunnel explained – Monday, September 19, from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the Mary Baldwin room. Find out why and how a 3,000-year-old tunnel in Jerusalem, dug by two opposing teams, met inside solid rock. Hint: they used rope or string, paint and copper.

Cinema morning: “Murder on the Orient Express” – Tuesday, September 20, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., at the Mary Baldwin Hall. Based on the 1934 novel by Agatha Christie. A lavish journey across Europe quickly turns into a race against time to solve a murder aboard a train. An avalanche brings the Orient Express to a dead halt and the world’s greatest detective, Hercule Poirot, arrives to question all passengers and search for clues before the killer can strike again. Kenneth Branagh directed and plays with Penélope Cruz, Willem Dafoe, Judi Dench, Johnny Depp, Leslie Odom Jr., Michelle Pfeiffer. Rated PG-13. (2017, 1:54). No registration is required.

Caregiver Support Group (in person and online) – Wednesday, September 21, from noon to 1 p.m. at the Loft, upper level, or via Zoom. A support group for caregivers to share tips, strategies, challenges and successes. Caregivers of all types are welcome, including spouses and adult children caring for parents, child caregivers and professional caregivers.

Books over coffee: “The Overstory” – Wednesday, September 28, from 12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m., at the Loft, upper level. Meet new people, try new beers and have great chats. Bring your lunch and a favorite mug! This month’s book is “The Overstory” by Richard Powers, a Pulitzer Prize-winning work of environmental fiction.

Sisters in Crime–CT Panel: Creating Authentic Characters – Wednesday, September 28, from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., at the Mary Baldwin Hall. An exciting panel of accomplished mystery writers will share the process of creating characters in their novels. Fictional characters should be authentic enough to inspire varying emotions in the reader such as empathy, love, hate, and fear. The real test of authenticity is when the characters exist after the reader has finished the last page of the novel or story. Sisters in Crime has 4,500 members in more than 60 regional chapters around the world and offers networks, advice and support to mystery writers. Members are authors, readers, publishers, agents, booksellers and librarians bound by their affection for the mystery genre and their support for women who write mystery novels. This program is presented by the Connecticut Chapter of Sisters in Crime. Panelists will include:

Roberta Isleib (who writes as Lucy Burdette): New Jersey-born Lucy Burdette, aka Roberta Isleib, is the author of 21 mysteries, including “A Dish to Die For,” the latest in the Key West series featuring food critic Hayley Snow (Crooked Lane Books.) “The Key Lime Crime,” the tenth in her mystery series on Key West food critics, won the Florida Book Award Bronze Medal for Popular Fiction. Lucy’s first thriller, ‘Unsafe Haven’, was published by Severn House last year. Her books and stories have been shortlisted for Agatha, Anthony and Macavity awards. She is a past president of Sisters in Crime and is currently president of the Friends of Key West Library.

Reed Farrel Coleman: Called a tough poet by NPR’s Maureen Corrigan, Reed Farrel Coleman is the New York Times bestselling author of 32 novels, including six in Robert B. Parker’s Jesse Stone series. It has four times received the Shamus Prize for best IP novel of the year. He is four times nominated for the Edgar Prize in three different categories. He has also received the Audie, Scribe, Macavity, Barry and Anthony awards. He lives on Long Island with his wife.

David Rich: David Rich is the author of three novels: “The Mirrored Palace”, a historical novel about Richard Francis Burton on the Hajj, “Caravan of Thieves” and “Middle Man”, which are action thrillers. David has spent most of his career in Hollywood. He wrote the feature “Renegades,” starring Kiefer Sutherland and Lou Diamond Philips, and worked on screenplays for stars ranging from Marlon Brando to Don “The Dragon” Wilson, from Macolm McDowell to Betty Buckley. For television, David wrote episodes of “MacGyver”, “StarGate-SG1” and “Legend”. David has written three plays: ‘The Interview’, ‘The Rescue’ and ‘WAR (Women’s Armed Resistance)’. He also teaches fiction and screenwriting in a graduate program in Connecticut.

Lynn Sheft, panel moderator: Lynn Sheft is an American author of thrillers and short stories. His short story, “A Tryst with Fate” was published in Seascape: The Best New England Crime Stories. “The Deadly Game” is his first novel. Originally from New Jersey, she received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Miami and established herself as a professional writer and creative director in South Florida. During her career, she has won ADDY and CLIO awards for her campaigns with regional and national consumer accounts. In addition, she has written articles for magazines, provided editing services, and served as an assistant instructor teaching ESL classes. When she moved to Connecticut, she turned to writing fiction full-time.

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11 Best Hotels in Fredericksburg TX https://deepwood.net/11-best-hotels-in-fredericksburg-tx/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 05:22:24 +0000 https://deepwood.net/11-best-hotels-in-fredericksburg-tx/ Weekend getaway to Fredericksburg TX and looking for a place to stay? Fredericksburg has over 1,500 bed and breakfasts, vacation rentals, AirBnBs, and bed and breakfasts, but if you’re looking for hotels, read on below. SEE ALSO: Ultimate Guide to Things to Do in Fredericksburg If you’re on a budget, cheap hotels in Fredericksburg, TX […]]]>

Best hotels in Fredericksburg Texas

Weekend getaway to Fredericksburg TX and looking for a place to stay? Fredericksburg has over 1,500 bed and breakfasts, vacation rentals, AirBnBs, and bed and breakfasts, but if you’re looking for hotels, read on below.

SEE ALSO: Ultimate Guide to Things to Do in Fredericksburg

If you’re on a budget, cheap hotels in Fredericksburg, TX are plentiful. Here’s a look at some of the best hotels in Fredericksburg.

Albert Hotel Fredericksburg Texas

Hotel Albert

Although this hotel won’t open until 2023, I wanted to include it due to the lack of hotel options in Fredericksburg. The Albert Hotel is the city’s first boutique hotel and is spread across four historic buildings. The New Waterloo hotel group commissioned architect Albert Keidel, given his passion for historic preservation. Located downtown, this space seems to attract local Austinites as well as visitors wishing to stay on Main Street. It will host three restaurants, two bars and a private space for gastronomic events.

242 East Main Street Fredericksburg, TX https://alberthotel.com/

SEE ALSO: 11 Best Wine Tours in Fredericksburg, Texas

Inn on Barons Creek

Fredericksburg is home to some of the most popular hotels in the state, including Inn On Barons Creek. This hotel offers guests a unique experience as it is within walking distance of downtown Fredericksburg and has great on-site amenities. Guests can enjoy a heated outdoor pool and convenient fitness center during their stay, and 90 suites are available, including seven cozy creekside suites. A free breakfast is also included with every visit.

308 S Washington St, Fredericksburg, TX 78624 innonbaronscreek.com

Hampton Inn & Suites Fredericksburg

The Hampton Inn & Suites is located on Main Street in Fredericksburg, which puts it within walking distance of all shopping, several great restaurants, and wine tasting rooms. The hotel also has the National Museum of the Pacific War near its premises and the Japanese Peace Garden. Guests can enjoy a daily breakfast buffet at Hampton Inn & Suites.

515 E Main St, Fredericksburg, TX 78624 hilton.com

Best Western Plus

The Best Western Plus hotel is perfect for those who want a taste of German culture and heritage or explore the great outdoors. It is located in a quiet location and accepts pets. Guests can enjoy the outdoor swimming pool and access to the vineyards and golf courses. There are also art galleries nearby.

314 E Hwy St, Fredericksburg, TX 78624 bestwestern.com

Holiday Inn Express & Suites Fredericksburg

The Holiday Inn Express Hotel and Suites in Fredericksburg is a great place to stay when visiting the area. The hotel offers 24-hour coffee and tea, as well as a deluxe continental breakfast. There’s also a full-service business center on-site. You can enjoy the superb hot tub or a swimming pool with six waterfalls and a slide. The 24-hour front desk is there to meet your every need and express check-in is available to make your stay even more enjoyable.

500 South Washington Fredericksburg, TX fredericksburgholidayinn.com

Fairfield Inn & Suites Fredericksburg

The Marriott of Fredericksburg offers guests a variety of amenities during their stay. A free breakfast is served each morning and free Wi-Fi is available throughout the hotel. Rooms are spacious and include free parking. You can sip and savor on a wine tour through one of the most visited wine countries. The Fredericksburg Winery is just a five-minute drive from the Marriott, making it the perfect place to stay for wine lovers. The hotel is also close to the National Museum of the Pacific War, Das Peach Haus by Fischer & Wieser, and Admiral Nimitz State Historic Site.

513 Friendship Ln, Fredericksburg, TX 78624 marriott.com

Country inn and cabins

If you’re looking for a quiet, peaceful place to stay in Fredericksburg, Country Inn & Cottages is the place to be. Located on a 200-acre ranch, this property offers guests two distinct properties: an inn just one mile from downtown Fredericksburg and cottages just five miles from the heart of town. Both locations accept dogs! The Inn in Town offers budget rooms with one king or two queen beds, while there are private 1-3 bedroom cottages at The Cottages. Guests can enjoy continental breakfast at the inn, breakfast vouchers for those staying in the cottages, seasonal pools, hot tubs, and free Wi-Fi.

1644 US-290, Fredericksburg, TX 78624 mycountryinn.com

Barons Creekside in Fredericksburg Texas

Creekside Barons

Fredericksburg offers a variety of places to stay, from camping and cabins to hotels and resorts. One such location is Baron’s Creekside, a unique log cabin village just three minutes from Main Street. Baron’s Creekside features 26 acres of rolling hills in a vineyard, with a bistro, wine bar and live music in an eclectic indoor/outdoor setting, making it the perfect place for your getaway. Each cabin has its own air conditioning unit and a private barbecue.

316 Goehmann Ln, Fredericksburg, TX 78624 baronscreekside.com

La Quinta Inn & Suites by Wyndham Fredericksburg

The La Quinta Inn & Suites Fredericksburg is a convenient and affordable option for those looking to stay in the Fredericksburg area. The hotel is close to many wineries, so it’s a great option for those looking to do some wine tasting. The hotel also features an outdoor pool, hot tub, business center, and gym. Guests can also take advantage of free breakfast and Wi-Fi during their stay.

1465 E Main St, Fredericksburg, TX 78624 wyndhamhotels.com

Sunday House Inn & Suites

The Sunday House Inn is a great place to stay in Fredericksburg. It is within walking distance of shops and restaurants and is located in downtown Fredericksburg. Also, the reception is always open, so you can quickly get help if you need it. And finally, there is free parking, which is definitely a plus.

501 E Main St, Fredericksburg, TX 78624 sundayhouseinn.com

Peach Tree Inn & Suites

If you’re looking for a place to stay in Fredericksburg, TX that offers affordable rates and a unique park-like setting, then the Peach Tree Inn & Suites is the place for you. This hotel is located a few blocks from historic Main Street and offers guests a complimentary breakfast and outdoor parking. Plus, the inn has a beautiful setting, with picnic tables and grills under the pecan and oak trees.

401 S Washington St, Fredericksburg, TX 78624 thepeachtreeinn.com

Econo Lodge Fredericksburg

The Econo Lodge Fredericksburg is a pet-friendly hotel that offers guests a seasonal outdoor pool, hot tub, guest computer, and free parking for large vehicles. This hotel is located near Texas Hill Country and LBJ State Park and 23 minutes from Enchanted Rock State Natural Area. Guests can enjoy a free continental breakfast each morning.

810 S Adams St, Fredericksburg, TX 78624

Comfort Inn & Suites

The Comfort Inn & Suites is a great place for a family hotel. They offer a hot breakfast, outdoor pool, hot tub, and free Wi-Fi. You can also pick up a free weekday newspaper while you’re there. They are close to Mexican restaurants if you need a quick bite and only a 5 minute drive to the National Museum of the Pacific War.

723 S Washington St, Fredericksburg, TX 78624

Super 8 by Wyndham Fredericksburg

The Super 8 by Wyndham Fredericksburg is located near the I-10 freeway and offers easy access to Austin and San Antonio. Kerrville is only 24 miles from the hotel. This simple, budget hotel offers free Wi-Fi, cable/satellite TV, free light breakfast, car, bus and truck parking, outdoor pool, meeting room and barbecue area. The hotel also has a laundromat on site.

514 E Main St, Fredericksburg, TX 78624 wyndhamhotels.com

Sunset Inn & Suites

If you are looking for a comfortable place to stay in Fredericksburg, TX, the Sunset Inn and Suites is a great option. This motel offers apartment-style accommodations with separate living areas, as well as a kitchenette or fully equipped kitchen. There is also free Wi-Fi and free parking. The property has a friendly restaurant, on-site laundry facilities and a private area for dog walking.

900 S Adams St, Fredericksburg, TX 78624

Days Inn by Wyndham Suites Fredericksburg

Days Inn by Wyndham offers a variety of amenities for guests to enjoy during their stay. These include free breakfast, free Wi-Fi, in-room microwaves and refrigerators, and pet-friendly accommodations. Guests will also enjoy the seasonal outdoor pool and scenic gazebo overlooking landscaped grounds. Kerrville is 35 km from the hotel.

808 S Adams St, Fredericksburg, TX 78624 wyndhamhotels.com

Fredericksburg offers a variety of hotels and motels, but if you’re looking for something more intimate or want the ability to cook your own meals, then Airbnb might be a better choice for you. There are many properties to choose from in Fredericksburg, so take your time and find the one that best suits your needs.

RELATED: 27 Best Restaurants in Fredericksburg TX

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Historic Homes You Can Own in Auburn and Cayuga County | Local News | Auburn, NY | Auburnpub.com https://deepwood.net/historic-homes-you-can-own-in-auburn-and-cayuga-county-local-news-auburn-ny-auburnpub-com/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 15:30:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/historic-homes-you-can-own-in-auburn-and-cayuga-county-local-news-auburn-ny-auburnpub-com/ The only home of its kind on the edge of Lake Owasco leading directly to the beautiful lake. This home represents beautiful Victorian architecture, built with quality materials by true craftsmen in 1907. Situated on 1.7 acres of land with 274.53 feet of waterfront, and a charming two-story shed that can accommodate 3 cars. and […]]]>

The only home of its kind on the edge of Lake Owasco leading directly to the beautiful lake. This home represents beautiful Victorian architecture, built with quality materials by true craftsmen in 1907. Situated on 1.7 acres of land with 274.53 feet of waterfront, and a charming two-story shed that can accommodate 3 cars. and 2 boats. Some of the highlights of this home include its stunning chestnut woodwork, gorgeous pocket doors, intricate staircase, stained glass windows, custom-built pantry, and third-floor living areas with wood-burning fireplace. The kitchen, dining area, and back porch offer plenty of seating with waterfront views. Board your boat from your backyard and explore all that Lake Owasco has to offer. The home is located one minute from Owasco’s Emerson Park, REV Broadway Theater, Country Club and Golf Course. The historic downtown district of the city of Auburn, known for its museums, art exhibits, comedy shows, fine dining, top-notch grocery store and pharmacy, is 2 minutes away. Owasco is located in the beautiful Finger Lakes region of New York, 4:30 hours from New York. Nearby towns and villages include: Syracuse, Skaneateles, Aurora and Ithaca.

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