History Museums – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 17:28:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://deepwood.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2-150x150.png History Museums – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ 32 32 Schmidt Boca Raton History Museum to Host Three Special Events in December – Boca Raton’s Most Trusted Source https://deepwood.net/schmidt-boca-raton-history-museum-to-host-three-special-events-in-december-boca-ratons-most-trusted-source/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 17:18:40 +0000 https://deepwood.net/schmidt-boca-raton-history-museum-to-host-three-special-events-in-december-boca-ratons-most-trusted-source/ Archaeological Discoveries in Boca Raton – December 1Holiday Sips and Sounds – December 8Palm Beach County and the Second Seminole War – December 14 (Boca Raton, Florida – November 22, 2022) The Schmidt Boca Raton History Museum (SBRHM) today announced that it will host three special events next month: two public lectures and the return […]]]>

Archaeological Discoveries in Boca Raton – December 1
Holiday Sips and Sounds – December 8
Palm Beach County and the Second Seminole War – December 14

(Boca Raton, Florida – November 22, 2022) The Schmidt Boca Raton History Museum (SBRHM) today announced that it will host three special events next month: two public lectures and the return of popular music series Sips & Sounds. For more information, please visit www.BocaHistory.org, or call 561.395.6766, ext. 100.

Thursday 1 December, at 6 p.m.
Discussion at the town hall
Archaeological finds in Boca Raton
Robert Carr, Executive Director of the Archaeological and Historical Conservancy, will discuss pre-Columbian archeology at Ocean Strand and other Boca Raton sites. The event begins at 6 p.m. with registration and refreshments, and the conference begins at 6:30 p.m. FREE for BRHS members, $10 for guests.

Thursday 8 December, at 6 p.m.
Holiday sips and sounds
Jeff Kaye & Krescendo Jazz will present a program of Holiday Favorites ranging from Jingle Bells and Winter Wonderland to Rock of Ages and Silent Night. There will also be a choir singing. The evening will include everything from jazz standards to more traditional dishes.

  • 6:00 p.m. to 6:45 p.m.
    Cocktail sponsored by the Windham Hotel
  • 6:45 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
    Performance
    Musicians include Jeff Kaye (trumpet), Rick Krive (keyboard), Cody Alan (saxophone) and singers Joanna Kaye and Wendy Pederson.
    Tickets: $60 for BRHS members; $70 for non-members
    For more information or to purchase tickets, please visit: https://www.bocahistory.org/holiday-sips-sounds

Wednesday 14 December, at 6 p.m.
Discussion at the town hall
Palm Beach County and the Second Seminole War
A discussion between Jupiter Inlet & Lighthouse Curator Josh Liller and BRHS Curator Susan Gillis. The event begins at 6 p.m. with registration and refreshments, and the conference begins at 6:30 p.m. FREE for BRHS members, $10 for guests.

Currently on display at the Schmidt Boca Raton History Museum:
Fifty years of collecting

Until December 2022
Featuring artifacts and memorabilia that represent the wide array of items that make up the ever-growing historic collections at the Schmidt Boca Raton History Museum, the new temporary exhibit includes everything from Floy Mitchell’s flapper dress to a vote Votomatic from approximately 2000. These objects show the breadth of the Boca Raton Historical Society’s collections acquired over the past half century and tell how Boca Raton has grown and changed since its inception as a farming village in the 1890s .

About the Schmidt Boca Raton History Museum:
The Schmidt Boca Raton History Museum is the headquarters of the Boca Raton Historical Society, whose mission is to collect, preserve, and present information and artifacts relevant to the past and evolving history of Boca Raton and to maintain a role visible in education and advocacy for historic preservation in the community. Now open to the public Wednesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., the
The museum is located in the historic City Hall at 71 N. Federal Highway (33432). For more information, please call 561.395.6766 or visit www.BocaHistory.org.

Available for interview:
Mary Csar, Executive Director
Schmidt Boca Raton Historical Museum
561.395.6766 / director@bocahistory.org

Media Contact:
Gary Schweikhart, PR-BS
561.756.4298 / gary@pr-bs.net

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The historic Cibali police station will be turned into a museum https://deepwood.net/the-historic-cibali-police-station-will-be-turned-into-a-museum/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/the-historic-cibali-police-station-will-be-turned-into-a-museum/ ISTANBUL The historic Cibali police station building in Istanbul’s Fatih district, which also appeared on stage as the subject of one of Turkish theater’s classic plays, will be turned into a museum. class=”cf”> Cibali Police Station was quite famous in the neighborhood where many public order incidents occurred during the time it was in service. […]]]>
ISTANBUL

The historic Cibali police station building in Istanbul’s Fatih district, which also appeared on stage as the subject of one of Turkish theater’s classic plays, will be turned into a museum.

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Cibali Police Station was quite famous in the neighborhood where many public order incidents occurred during the time it was in service.

The building was rented to the Regional Directorate of Foundations to be restored and repaired in order to make it a police museum.

A total of 6,950,000 Turkish liras ($374,000) has been allocated from the cultural heritage budget of the Istanbul Governor’s Office for the renovation works of the building.

Renovation works are in progress, while the objects to be displayed in the museum have also been examined and selected.

Wax statues of famous theater actor Nejat Uygur, known for his role in the play “Cibali Police Station”, and policemen will also feature in the museum.

Uygur broke ratings records with his role in the play in the 80s and 90s.

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While the police station was often highlighted at public order events in Istanbul, Cibali Police Station was turned into a play that would later become one of the legends of Turkish theatre.

Turkish theater actor Muammer Karaca brought the police station to the stage in 1951 and the play has been performed many times in the country and abroad.

Due to the success of the play, in which well-known actresses such as Adile Naşit and Gülriz Sururi played in the cast, Cibali Police Station was also adapted for cinema.

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How to save public art museums (a modest proposal!) https://deepwood.net/how-to-save-public-art-museums-a-modest-proposal/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 06:44:37 +0000 https://deepwood.net/how-to-save-public-art-museums-a-modest-proposal/ Image by Jessica Pamp. To study the visual arts, you have to travel. And although we have excellent reproductions, we still believe that there is a difference in kind between looking at the original work and seeing even the best copy. Public art museums flourished by presenting many loan exhibitions and attracting many visitors from […]]]>

Image by Jessica Pamp.

To study the visual arts, you have to travel. And although we have excellent reproductions, we still believe that there is a difference in kind between looking at the original work and seeing even the best copy. Public art museums flourished by presenting many loan exhibitions and attracting many visitors from far away. But covid has made travel much more difficult, if not impossible. And the ecological problems created by intensive air travel are serious. The crucial question then is what can be done. My goal in writing as a philosopher is to provide constructive analysis. Is there a way to preserve our vigorous museum culture of public art without requiring so much travel? To discuss this issue, consider a six-step slippery slope argument. Each step on its own is seemingly plausible, but taken together, these steps lead to an unexpected conclusion.

The first step.

When the Louvre is crowded, see mona-lisa is difficult. Here’s how to avoid the problem. Buy your ticket in advance, arrive early at the Louvre, enter through the side door and walk very quickly to the Salle des Etats. Then you’ll have a few minutes almost alone with her before the crowds arrive.

Second step.

You are very nearsighted, and therefore without solid glasses you cannot see anything at a distance. But when you wear your glasses, if you enter the Louvre early in the morning, you can see mona-lisa.

Third step.

You can only go to the Louvre in the middle of the morning, when it is very crowded. Fortunately, however, you brought a periscope, which allows you to look over other people. Just as you can see the moon through the optical apparatus of a telescope, you can see mona-lisa with this simple technology.

Fourth step.

Webcams allow you to watch anywhere and anytime directly from your computer. For example, a webcam shows Andy Warhol’s grave at St. John the Baptist Byzantine Catholic Cemetery near Pittsburgh. .https://www.warhol.org/andy-warhols-life/figment/ Try it now! If a similar publicly accessible webcam were installed in the Salle des Etats, then you could see mona-lisa from anywhere at any time.

Fifth stage

Rather than leaving the lights on in the Hall of States, the curators make a recording during the day and play it back at night. After all, when the gallery is deserted, there is no need to watch every move. There is always a short delay to see what is visible on the back wall, even if you are in the gallery. Now, this delay is a bit longer. You see mona-lisa remotely a few minutes or hours ago.

Sixth step.

Imagine that a remote viewing system is installed in all the galleries. We would then have an entirely virtual Louvre. All the works visible in Paris would be accessible online. A webcam allows you to see distant places. The webcam plus recorder allows you to see distant places at earlier times. When I look at my desk, which is close at hand, it takes a very short time for the light to reach my eyes. When using the Louvre webcam from Pittsburgh, a little more time passes. But of course, the light we now see from the stars has been traveling for a very long time.

Have mona-lisa, you have to be in the Louvre. But you can see a representation of her anywhere. Our analysis undermines this basic commonsense distinction. Where if somewhere it goes wrong? If glasses let you see it, then can’t you also see it through a periscope? And if you can see her in that mirror image, why not use a webcam? You can already see some things that are very far away: the moon, the planets and the stars. Right now you can’t see mona-lisa of Pittsburgh because there are a lot of physical objects between you and the Louvre. But just as a mirror lets us see around corners, a webcam lets us look from Pittsburgh to Paris.

If the sixth stage conclusion is unacceptable, then at what stage is this argument unacceptable? Slippery slope arguments can be tricky. And philosophers pay great attention to perception. We can for example agree that the webcam makes it possible to see things from a distance. But does this experience constitute the vision of these things? Maybe looking at the webcam image is like looking at a photo. Perhaps, however, it’s more like being a myopic person using solid glasses. It is not easy to resolve this discussion.

So far, only philosophers would be concerned with this argument about perception. But this situation has changed. If travel is more difficult and museum crowds are unhealthy, then maybe we should create virtual museums. And so right now there is a real incentive to change our ways of thinking. There were two ways to gain visual knowledge about a painting. You can see it, or you can look at pictures of it. Sometimes photographs can provide additional or better information than the direct gaze. Because mona-lisa is under bulletproof glass, you now get a clearer view from good photography than from direct observation at the Louvre. However, to look at such a photograph is not to see the painting. But this situation could change. New technologies like the webcam can complicate our thinking about perception. The glasses considered at stage two or the periscope mirror at stage three are also inventions, just more familiar because they are much older.

For several decades, we have been waiting for this virtual museum. In 1997, in New Zealand, I reviewed an exhibition shared between a museum in that country and a gallery in Holland. Since most examiners could not access both sites, we were given a CD-Rom allowing us to virtually advance, turn left or right, advance or retreat in the galleries of the two hemispheres. And so I discussed both exhibits in my review. The remote viewing system has been improved a lot, and now the virtual museum is more attractive. When in 2021 I reviewed a Rembrandt exhibition in Basel, I was able online to easily walk around the galleries virtually, view the floor layout, and take a close look at individual works in Pittsburgh.

In the public museum, looking at art is a social experience. You can talk with a friend and hear other people’s conversations. This is why the birth of the public art museum is linked to the development of the public sphere in the construction of modernist democracy. But today’s technology makes it possible to enter the public sphere from your study. Thanks to Skype, you can talk remotely with other people even if you are alone in your room. And you can share texts you read or pictures you see. If traveling remains difficult and entering crowded public spaces unsafe, would people believe that seeing a work of art online counts as seeing that artifact? Would you still go to the museum just to see what’s best seen on your computer? If you could browse the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Gallery in London and the Hermitage online, would you still travel to Manhattan, London and St. Petersburg? Museums depend on admission fees. But if these funding sources were drastically reduced, then, just as some news sites now charge for Internet access, museums could adopt this policy. And if those museums couldn’t charge as much as they currently do for physical admission, maybe they’re making up the difference with more attendance.

Currently, museum exhibits are often overcrowded. This problem could disappear, because online museums would be accessible to everyone. Of course, just as distance learning only works for people with good home access, online museums wouldn’t work for everyone. Perhaps the curators could be inspired to redesign the museum. Loan exhibitions involve the moving of expensive and labor-intensive artworks. Museums need expensive, fully staffed buildings, often in high-rent neighborhoods. And even our largest institutions have only limited space for permanent collections. But online museums might show full reservations. These can be full exhibitions by any artist, including estate or site-specific works. And the museum could be physically located anywhere. In the Edward Hopper online exhibition in 2020 at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland, the website offered a good close-up view of individual paintings, interpretations by scholars, a walk both with visitors and in the empty galleries , and an eight-minute video of a Swiss rapper, Laurin Buser. The experimentation that I am describing speculatively has already begun.

When the coronavirus shut down movie theaters, audiences turned to streaming. With a big screen and comfortable seating, you might prefer watching movies at home. Still, some people like to go to the theater. But films are not made to be screened in a particular place. The paintings were made to be seen by onlookers standing nearby. But of course, for a long time, changes have taken place in the way art is presented. Beginning in the late 18th century, the art museum took old European altarpieces, African masks, Chinese scrolls, and artifacts from all visual cultures and transformed them into works of art. This change involved detaching them from their original context and focusing attention on their common characteristics. Many people were skeptical about the ability of these artifacts to survive this drastic change. Even if an altarpiece is physically unchanged, they argued, when it is moved into the museum, its original sacred function is gone. The change I now imagine could be just as dramatic, and so its implications are not yet easy to fathom.

Remarks:

My quoted reviews are: “The World Over, City Gallery, Wellington”, art forumFebruary 1997: 99. On Rembrandt,

https://brooklynrail.org/2021/02/artseen/Rembrandts-Orient-West-Meets-East-in-Dutch-Art-of-the-Seventeenth-Century On Edward Hopper:

https://hyperallergic.com/582163/cabinet-of-curiosities-massimo-listri-taschen/ My book on art museums: Museum Skepticism: A History of Art Exhibition in Public Galleries (Duke University Press, 2006).

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Before withdrawing from Kherson, Russian troops emptied one of the best Ukrainian museums of almost 15,000 objects https://deepwood.net/before-withdrawing-from-kherson-russian-troops-emptied-one-of-the-best-ukrainian-museums-of-almost-15000-objects/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 21:13:38 +0000 https://deepwood.net/before-withdrawing-from-kherson-russian-troops-emptied-one-of-the-best-ukrainian-museums-of-almost-15000-objects/ Last week, in what could be a major turning point in its war against Ukraine, Russia announced a withdrawal from the war-torn city of Kherson. But before the occupying troops left the strategic city, they emptied one of its most important artistic institutions. According to Ukrainian Army National Resistance Center, Russian soldiers two weeks ago […]]]>

Last week, in what could be a major turning point in its war against Ukraine, Russia announced a withdrawal from the war-torn city of Kherson. But before the occupying troops left the strategic city, they emptied one of its most important artistic institutions.

According to Ukrainian Army National Resistance Center, Russian soldiers two weeks ago looted nearly 15,000 objects from the Oleksiy Shovkunenko Kherson Art Museum and other cultural venues in the region. The move came just days after Vladimir Putin imposed martial law on Kherson and three other Ukrainian territories, effectively legalize the “evacuation” of cultural heritage.

The Kherson Art Museum confirmed the theft in a Facebook postexplaining that between October 31 and November 3, three or four dozen Russian soldiers arrived at the institution and “brought out works of art and office equipment – everything they saw, everything their raked hands could reach”.

According to the museum, the paintings and other works of art were “wrapped in a kind of cloth,” rather than proper packing supplies, and loaded onto trucks and buses. The looted goods were then transferred to Simferopol in Crimea.

The museum explained at the time that its administrators did not know what had been stolen, but said there was no doubt the “most valuable” items in the collection were targeted.

“In their opinion, it’s called ‘evacuation,'” the museum’s message read. “According to U.S, [it is] looting under the slogans of “preservation of cultural values”.

Prior to the incident, the museum’s collection included religious paintings from the 17th and 20th centuries, Ukrainian art from the second half of the 19th and early 20th centuries, and contemporary art from the past 100 years. In a flight press briefingthe head of the culture department of the Kherson city council, Svitlana Dumynska, called it “one of the most impressive regional museum collections in Ukraine”.

Dumynska added that the local history museum in Kherson was also targeted by Russian troops, “but we have much less information about it.”

On November 3, Kherson police opened a criminal investigation in the theft, classifying it and other attacks in the region as a war crime.

Days later, footage that allegedly showed the stolen items from the Kherson Art Museum being unloaded from the Central Taurida Museum in Simferopol circulated on Ukrainian social media. In other Facebook postthe museum identified several works of art in the photos, including paintings by Ukrainian modernists Ivan Pokhytonov and Mykhailo Andrienko-Nechitaylo.

In a November 10 interview with the Moscow time—an independent media outlet—the director of the Taurida Museum, Andrei Malgin, confirmed that the looted works of art had landed in Simferopol.

“Due to the introduction of martial law in the territory of the Kherson region, I was instructed to take the exhibits from the Kherson Art Museum for temporary storage and ensure their safety until be returned to their rightful owner,” Malgin said.

The Kherson Art Museum has been closed since the city was taken by Russian soldiers at the start of the invasion. The institution’s director, Alina Dotsenko, left for Kyiv in May after the Russian occupiers demanded that the museum hold a propaganda exhibition, according to the art diary.

This month, Dotsenko told Ukrainian media that before she left, she convinced the Russians that the museum’s collection had been moved for a planned renovation. She also deleted information about the institution’s holdings from her computers.

But Dotensko said another museum employee, curator Natalya Koltsova, led Russian troops to the stored collection in July. Koltsova, whom Dotsenko had fired the previous year, was brought back to work with the Russians, and a former cabaret singer was appointed puppet director.

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Dinosaur exhibit at Gallipolis | News, Sports, Jobs https://deepwood.net/dinosaur-exhibit-at-gallipolis-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 06:48:22 +0000 https://deepwood.net/dinosaur-exhibit-at-gallipolis-news-sports-jobs/ The Manitoba pliosaur is a new, undescribed species of short-necked plesiosaur and is an example of one of many predators featured in the Savage Ancient Seas exhibit at the Bossard Library in Gallipolis. These marine predators dominated the seas millions of years ago. (Photo provided) GALLIPOLIS, Ohio — The world’s largest […]]]>

The Manitoba pliosaur is a new, undescribed species of short-necked plesiosaur and is an example of one of many predators featured in the Savage Ancient Seas exhibit at the Bossard Library in Gallipolis. These marine predators dominated the seas millions of years ago. (Photo provided)

GALLIPOLIS, Ohio — The world’s largest exhibit of marine paleontology featuring mounted fossils up to 45 feet long will be on display until December 31 at the Dr. Samuel L. Bossard Memorial Library in Gallipolis.

Savage Ancient Seas is an interactive exhibit produced by Embedded Exhibitions and part of Triebold Paleontology Inc. headquartered at the Rocky Mountain Dinosaur Resource Center in Woodland Park, Colorado. The exhibit traveled to major museums across the United States, including the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, the Fernbank Museum of Natural History in Atlanta, Georgia, and the Las Vegas Natural History Museum.

Exhibition hours are 1 to 4:30 p.m. Sunday, 10 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Monday to Friday, and 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday. The Bossard Memorial Library is located at 7 Spruce St., Gallipolis.

The process to bring Savage Ancient Seas to Gallia County began earlier this year, Bossard Library Director Debbie Saunders said.

Work continued throughout the year to prepare for the major exhibition. The 5,000 square foot show is housed in the library’s large programming space, known as the Riverside Room, and the adjacent large print area.

Saunders said community support for the library has helped host world-class exhibits.

“Savage Ancient Seas is the third major exhibition presented at the library. This caliber of exhibit is typically featured in major metropolitan areas,” said Saunders. “However, the library board and administration strongly believe in the importance of bringing this cultural opportunity closer to home to provide a unique educational experience for those in the tri-state area.”

In addition to seeing replica fossils, visitors will also be able to touch real fossils, enjoy hands-on and interactive kiosks, touch screens and virtual content.

The exposure is appropriate for children and adults, according to Saunders.

The Bossard Library encourages individual residents and families, school groups, and civic or community organizations to visit Savage Ancient Seas. Groups can register to visit the exhibition.

“The library has hosted school groups from as far away as Cincinnati for past exhibits,” said Saunders. “We encourage all local school districts to take advantage of this incredible field trip opportunity.”

Teaching guides with additional information about the exhibit are available on the library’s website at bossardlibrary.org, she said.

The fossils featured in Savage Ancient Seas mostly date from the late Cretaceous, around 70 million years ago. Specimens on display include the enormous Tylosaurus, the jaws of the Megalodon, and the flying Pteranodon, among many others.

The fossil replicas depict creatures that lived in the vast Western Interior Seaway that covered most of the American Midwest between the Arctic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico millions of years ago. The mounted and arranged skeletons allow visitors to grasp how these ancient “sea monsters” might have looked like and how they lived in the age of the dinosaurs.



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Aramark, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh and more — 11/07/22 https://deepwood.net/aramark-thermo-fisher-scientific-carnegie-museums-of-pittsburgh-and-more-11-07-22/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 01:03:14 +0000 https://deepwood.net/aramark-thermo-fisher-scientific-carnegie-museums-of-pittsburgh-and-more-11-07-22/ Hiring? Post your job here to meet over 20,000 local job seekers every week. And come back every Monday and Thursday for the latest work openings in Pittsburgh. IT and Engineering Thermo Fisher Scientific seeks a Software Engineer III – Corporate to develop enterprise catalog solutions related to the product data supply chain, provide technical […]]]>

Hiring? Post your job here to meet over 20,000 local job seekers every week. And come back every Monday and Thursday for the latest work openings in Pittsburgh.

IT and Engineering

Thermo Fisher Scientific seeks a Software Engineer III – Corporate to develop enterprise catalog solutions related to the product data supply chain, provide technical guidance for feature planning, ensure reliability and scalability of the product pipeline. data through automation, remove technical blockages and more.

Non-profit


Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh is hiring a Program Manager, Membership, to expand the scale and reach of membership programs and events at all four Carnegie Museums and create new engagement experiences for members.

Higher Education

Chatham University is looking for an Admissions Data Operations Processor to perform administrative duties, oversee data entry and integrity, perform systems audits, maintain enrollment documentation and more Again.

Governmental

Allegheny County hires poll workers to interact with the public and keep abreast of election changes.

Business and finance


DICK’S Sporting Goods is seeking a Financial Planning and Analysis Manager – Merchandising to provide financial analysis, serve as the financial manager for the company’s transformational attack categories, assess the impact of key strategies and investments, oversee supplier profitability analysis and more.

Administrative

The City of Pittsburgh Housing Authority is seeking an Administrative Assistant to provide clerical and administrative support to the Public Safety Department.

food service

Hello Bistro is hiring a Shift Supervisor to coordinate restaurant operations during scheduled shifts, greet customers, provide customer service, manage team members and more.

Advertising

Comcast has an opening for an Advertising Accounts Specialist to develop advertising sales materials, packages, proposals and presentations to meet the priorities of assigned market segments and to provide advanced and specialized support to strategic accounts.

Education

The Falk School is looking for a Faculty Instructor/Substitute K-8 teacher to deliver lessons, manage the learning environment, and follow up on lesson plans in the absence of the teacher. incumbent.

Facilities


Aramark has an opening for an Environmental Services Manager to execute facility solutions to ensure health and safety standards, service and maintain a physical location or site, manage facility operations and more.

State-of-the-art manufacturing

Adaptec Solutions is hiring a Field Service Technician II to install, repair and inspect conveyors, hoists, cranes and other material handling equipment.

Industrial Service Solutions is looking for a Field Service Technician to perform maintenance, diagnostics and repairs of rotating equipment and mechanical and electrical controls, optimize equipment performance, consult with operations crews and more.

Sponsored

Coordinator, Staff Training and Development at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh: The Coordinator will manage the overall training and development function at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, organizing and implementing programs for all staff.
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Manager of Library Services at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh: CLP Homewood’s Library Services Manager (LSM) leads a team of library staff who are dedicated to community engagement by providing high quality library services and programs. LSM actively participates as a member of management groups to effect change and implement strategies,
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Agricultural Resource Conservator at Allegheny County Conservation District: The ACCD is recruiting an Agricultural Resource Conservator to liaise with the agricultural sector in Allegheny County and manage programs that provide significant technical and financial resources to help protect and improve agricultural land.
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Car Washers / Service Agents at Opmax Services of Pennsylvania: Leading provider of car rental services at Pittsburgh International Airport. The work includes, but is not limited to: cleaning the interior and exterior of vehicles; vacuuming; fill the gas tank; checking and filling the liquid compartments. Pay rate: $15.50/hour. Possibility of growth. (412) 329-7146.
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Program Coordinator, Executive Education – Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University: We are looking for a Program Coordinator within the Tepper School of Business. This position supports the operational aspects of assigned events/programs, manages communications, program planning and logistics, and is responsible for the efficient and cost-effective administration of the program.
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All positions at Aslin Beer Co: Aslin Beer Company is recruiting for all positions including management positions and reception and reception staff at our new location in the Strip District which will open in late November.
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Fundraising (part-time, short-term) at the Thomas Merton Center: The Thomas Merton Center is hiring a short-term, part-time contract fundraiser who will lead our year-end fundraising efforts from November through February. identifying fundraising opportunities, soliciting donations from members, donors and potential donors, and managing our year-end fundraising campaign.
Posted on November 02, 2022

Development Coordinator – Pittsburgh CLO at Pittsburgh CLO: The Pittsburgh CLO, hailed as one of the premier regional theaters in the nation, is seeking an enterprising, organized, and customer service oriented individual to serve as Development Coordinator. The successful candidate will provide primary staff support for CLO’s fundraising efforts.
Posted on October 27, 2022

Family Mental Health Clinician at Every Child Inc.: Every child is looking for someone with skills in clinical assessment, counselling, crisis management and psychoeducation with a systems perspective. Our clinicians collaborate with a care team and support the whole family. This is a 40 hour per week position that is eligible for overtime and bonuses.
Posted on October 25, 2022

Duty Coordinator (SWAN) at Every Child Inc.: The Permanence Coordinator is responsible for identifying adoptive/kin families and connecting them with additional support to ensure stable permanency placements. They will perform assessments, identify individualized family service, and provide home visits, ongoing support, and case advocacy.
Posted on October 25, 2022

Family Support Worker at Every Child Inc.: Family support social workers connect families with resources and support them through service plans to retain custody of their children. They provide life skills education, connection to resources, and emotional support at home and in the community.
Posted on October 25, 2022

Full-Time Customer Service and Events Associates at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens: Phipps Guest Service and Events Associates assist with general admissions, gift shop operations and events to deliver a magical experience. Enjoy welcoming, engaging and interacting with our guests and other staff while participating in day-to-day operations! $15/h and benefits in a unique atmosphere.
Posted on October 25, 2022

K-8 teacher in the STEM Coding Lab: STEM Coding Lab, Inc. (SCL) is seeking a full-time teacher for its K-8 in-school and after-school programs. We work with Pittsburgh Public Schools, charter schools, other area public schools, and many nonprofit organizations.
Posted on October 25, 2022

Public Programs Coordinator at the Senator John Heinz History Center: The Public Programs Coordinator is responsible for planning, implementing, and staffing innovative and creative programs for museum audiences, including on-site, virtual, and hybrid program formats, and assisting to evaluate these programs.
Posted on October 25, 2022

Direct Support Professional at Achieva: At Achieva, our direct support professionals provide direct care and personal support to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in a community setting. Full-time, part-time and casual positions are available in Allegheny and Westmoreland counties.
Posted on October 24, 2022

University of Pittsburgh Career Fair at the University of Pittsburgh: Join the University of Pittsburgh for a career fair on November 16 from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the University Club, 123 University Place, on the Pittsburgh campus! The fair is open to all job seekers and showcases various positions available at Pitt. Discover, belong, contribute and grow with Pitt!
Posted on October 18, 2022

Event Sales Supervisor at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens: Event Sales Supervisor to manage on-site organization and supervision of events. Manage guest relationships, coordinate all event details with Phipps staff and vendors prior to events, determine logistics and floor plans, and provide direction on the day of events, ensuring a magical experience !
Posted on October 12, 2022

Executive Assistant at Posman Books: Posman Books is looking for an Assistant Manager to help run our Pittsburgh store. Our Pittsburgh location is quite unique – we’ve partnered with Oddfellows Ice Cream to create the first bookstore/ice cream parlor (that we know of)! That means we’re looking for book lovers who are comfortable with a scoop.
Posted on October 11, 2022

Automation quote specialist at Premier Automation: Premier Automation is looking for an Automation Quotation Specialist to estimate project parts, labor costs and delivery schedules, and to interface with engineering, design and Purchasing that provide elite automation solutions to industry-leading customers around the world.
Posted on October 10, 2022

Executive Director at Grantmakers of Western Pennsylvania: Western PA Grantmakers, the region’s premier network for staff and trustees affiliated with 100 grantmakers, is seeking its next Executive Director to serve, connect and lead the regional philanthropic community.
Posted on October 04, 2022

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The Climate Museum opens its pop-up in New York https://deepwood.net/the-climate-museum-opens-its-pop-up-in-new-york/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 13:21:04 +0000 https://deepwood.net/the-climate-museum-opens-its-pop-up-in-new-york/ The Climate Museum, the very first American museum dedicated to climate crisisopened a pop-up in New York’s Soho with a major work of art by David Opdyke. The museum, which hopes to establish a permanent space, was created to foster learning and climate action through public programming and exhibitions. Opdyke’s One day all this mural […]]]>

The Climate Museum, the very first American museum dedicated to climate crisisopened a pop-up in New York’s Soho with a major work of art by David Opdyke.

The museum, which hopes to establish a permanent space, was created to foster learning and climate action through public programming and exhibitions.

Opdyke’s One day all this mural features 400 vintage postcards that the artist has decorated with apocalyptic imagery to explore the impact of the climate crisis on the American landscape. His work can also be seen in MoMA and the Brooklyn Museum.

Founded in 2015 by former civil rights lawyer Miranda Massiethe Climate Museum pop-up is in New York until December 22.

The museum’s programming was launched in 2018. Since then, it has offered free exhibits, art installations, interactive panels, youth programs, and advocacy tools in and around New York City.

“Museums are trusted and popular, and the arts reach people in the ways we most need to be reached: emotionally and collectively,” Massie said. the arts journal.

“There is an urgent need to move on climate consultation, expression and commitment. Without this cultural shift, we won’t get the transformative politics needed to protect our well-being and all the things we love.

The programming of the Climate Museum at the pop-up includes a presentation by the philosopher Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwòa climate science series for kids with NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies, and a climate justice Q&A with the founder of the Chisholm Legacy Project Jacqui Patterson.

Highlights also include a discussion on climate migration with journalists Vann Newkirk, Somini Senguptaand Sarah Stillmanand a virtual tour of the JOIDES Resolution climate expedition ship with a scientist Gisele Winckler.

Elsewhere, the non-profit youth organization Force of Nature organizes a climate coffee for eco-anxious guests at the Natural History Museum (NHM) in London during COP27.

Pictures: The Climate Museum

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Replicas of long-lost ‘sea dragons’ discovered in museum collections | Science https://deepwood.net/replicas-of-long-lost-sea-dragons-discovered-in-museum-collections-science/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 23:11:34 +0000 https://deepwood.net/replicas-of-long-lost-sea-dragons-discovered-in-museum-collections-science/ When paleontologist Dean Lomax was plumbing the depths of a fossil collection at Yale University’s Peabody Museum of Natural History in 2016, a dusty specimen caught his eye. He looked like a crocodile compressed on a slate slab. Peeling paint and patches of white plaster revealed that the “skeleton” was in fact a carefully constructed […]]]>

When paleontologist Dean Lomax was plumbing the depths of a fossil collection at Yale University’s Peabody Museum of Natural History in 2016, a dusty specimen caught his eye. He looked like a crocodile compressed on a slate slab. Peeling paint and patches of white plaster revealed that the “skeleton” was in fact a carefully constructed plaster cast – and that it was not a crocodile.

Although Lomax, a paleontologist at the University of Manchester, had never visited Peabody’s collection before, the specimen looked oddly familiar. But it wasn’t until he sifted through his photographs that the connection was made: the cast was nearly identical to a historical illustration of the earliest known Jurassic “sea dragon” skeleton. Three years later, he came across a similar cast in Germany.

It turns out that both casts were made from the same specimen: the skeleton of a nearly 200 million year old marine reptile known as an ichthyosaur, which had large eyes, the body of a dolphin and the toothy mouth of an alligator. The original skeleton had been destroyed in a bombing raid on London during World War II, making the two casts the only known records of this animal, Lomax reports today.

The findings will allow scientists to study the historic ichthyosaur in unprecedented detail, experts say. Paleontologists had relied solely on a 200-year-old illustration of the creature, notes Daniel Brinkman, a museum assistant in Peabody’s Department of Vertebrate Paleontology who helped Lomax study the Yale cast but is not the author of the new study. The new casts provide an opportunity to see how closely historical illustrations match the specimens themselves, he says. “This report will get people to take a closer look at some of their casts.”

Decades before the word “dinosaur” entered the scientific lexicon, ichthyosaurs were the rock stars of the nascent field of paleontology. The first complete ichthyosaur skeleton hails from Lyme Regis, a seaside town along the iconic Jurassic Coast in southern England. Inhabitants of a tropical sea from 200 million years ago erode the area’s wave-battered limestone cliffs, including squid-like ammonites, pterosaurs and a host of marine reptiles including ichthyosaurs and long-necked plesiosaurs.

Fossil hunters have flocked to these crumbling cliffs for centuries, thanks in part to the prodigious collecting of pioneering paleontologist Mary Anning in the early 1800s. The daughter of an amateur fossil hunter, Anning and her brother had discovered an entire ichthyosaur skull at the age of 12. At age 18, she discovered the most complete ichthyosaur specimen known at the time, the skeleton that became the source for the two rediscoveries. throw.

This remarkable discovery offered early paleontologists a tantalizing glimpse of what these puzzling prehistoric reptiles really looked like. “This specimen was a major piece of the gigantic prehistoric puzzle,” says Lomax.

The three surviving depictions of the first complete ichthyosaur skeleton, including the 1819 illustration (top), the Yale cast (middle), and the Berlin cast (bottom)William Clift/Royal Society

The fossil passed into the hands of a collector, who then sold it to help the Anning family through financial difficulties. Eventually, the skeleton ended up in the collection of the Royal College of Surgeons in London, where it was studied by British surgeon Sir Everard Home. Based on the creature’s flattened disc-shaped vertebrae, he incorrectly concluded that ichthyosaurs were a link between lizards and salamanders. In total, Home published five papers on ichthyosaur specimens discovered by Anning, each time failing to credit her as the discoverer.

More than a century later, in 1941, a bomb from a German air raid destroyed the London museum that housed the iconic fossil. And for decades, it appeared that the only remaining evidence of the first complete ichthyosaur specimen was the scientific illustration that accompanied Home’s articles.

Then came Lomax’s discovery of the two casts – one in the storerooms of Berlin’s Natural History Museum, a somewhat ironic home given the original specimen’s fiery fate.

Although both distributions are based on the same source material, they are not identical. The older Yale specimen is more deteriorated and painted a uniform shade of ash gray, while the Berlin cast is in better shape and has been painted to resemble the 1819 illustration. The Yale cast also appears to be a best representation of the original skeleton, Lomax and his co-author, State University of New York, Brockport, paleontologist Judy Massare, conclude today in Royal Society Open Science.

Where the Berlin cast is clearly based on the 1819 illustration, for example, the Yale cast has several traits – including the number of complex bones in the creature’s fore flippers and the shape of the humerus of the animal – which differ from the other two representations. These painstaking details, along with the age of the crumbling plaster, make it likely that the Yale cast was among the first casts made, potentially even before the skeleton arrived in London and was described by Home. “They go from just one more cast in the collection to a representation of the first ichthyosaur skeleton described from the beginning of paleontology,” says Lomax.

When researchers don’t reproduce rare fossils with casts, the results can be disastrous. The first fossil evidence of the giant predatory dinosaur Spinosaurus was destroyed in an Allied bombing of Munich in 1944, leaving behind only grainy illustrations and photographs. The predator was little more than a sail-backed enigma for half a century until researchers uncovered new fossil evidence.

Such losses still occur. Megan Jacobs, a paleontologist who studies ichthyosaurs at the University of Portsmouth, highlights the 2018 fire that devastated the National Museum of Brazil, which destroyed a cache of valuable pterosaur fossils, as the worst case scenario. “They lost almost everything and these are the only examples of these fossils in the world,” she says.

However, with the advent of 3D scanning technology, creating casts is becoming even easier as museums shift to digitizing important fossils. Jacobs says, “There’s really no excuse not to.”

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So you want my job as an artist: museum preparer https://deepwood.net/so-you-want-my-job-as-an-artist-museum-preparer/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 22:40:49 +0000 https://deepwood.net/so-you-want-my-job-as-an-artist-museum-preparer/ First a volunteer and now a museum preparator for 30 years at the Melbourne Museum, Dean Smith’s day job can range from defleshing beached whales to recording taxidermy data for researchers. In addition to being a Senior Preparator, Smith is also the Director of Environmental Creations, which provides professional “museum quality” natural history exhibits. His […]]]>

First a volunteer and now a museum preparator for 30 years at the Melbourne Museum, Dean Smith’s day job can range from defleshing beached whales to recording taxidermy data for researchers.

In addition to being a Senior Preparator, Smith is also the Director of Environmental Creations, which provides professional “museum quality” natural history exhibits. His work can be seen inside and outside museums, including at Butchers Shambles in Sovereign Hill and in the facilities of the University of New England Museum of Natural History.

Specimens that have passed through his hands include blue jellyfish, giant ant models, a realistic white pointer shark, kangaroos, lions and many more.

Along with Ewin Wood, Smith has a dedicated studio, Museum Makers in Castlemaine, Victoria, which handles various projects.

Learning his skills in a museum environment with the help of staff whose experience and techniques span centuries, Smith offers professional presentations and training programs, as well as short workshops for those wishing to bring back home an intricate work of taxidermy art.

How would you describe what you do?

A Museum Preparator is a unique role within Museums Victoria where we prepare materials and objects for the Science Department’s collections, education and exhibitions.

How did you start your career?

I have always had an interest in natural history and general sciences. Following an opportunity to do my high school work experience at the Melbourne Museum, I was adamant that I wanted to pursue a career as a museum preparator.

I volunteered in the department while pursuing my science studies at night school. A position became available after a few years and 35 years later, I am still employed as a preparer at the Museum.

What does an average day or week look like?

Check in the gallery spaces in the morning, carry out necessary repairs and maintenance, such as carving a model of a botanical specimen for an upcoming exhibition or skinning a thawed specimen to finish it another day as a taxidermy mount .

Dean Smith in studio with taxidermy. Image: courtesy of Environmental Creations and Dean Smith

What is the most common misconception about the profession of museum curator?

Museums Victoria Research Institute has an extensive collection of taxidermy mounts, skeletons and study skins; we have freezers full of specimens to skin and prepare each week.

One of the most important aspects of these functions is to save a large amount of data. Not all taxidermies are on display, but many specimens are regularly used for research, so the data we
record is as important as the mounted animal.

If you were interviewing someone for your job, what skills and qualities would you be looking for?

They are said to have a very keen eye and love for natural history, anatomy, sculpture, casting/molding knowledge and detail painting skills. You would also need a strong stomach as you might be gutting dead animals, including a whale that washed up on a secluded beach.

What’s the best thing happening in your field right now?

The possibility of integrating 3D modeling into our techniques, applying rendering or printing from three-dimensional (3D) scans that we have made from original objects. This allows us to make a replica of a museum object that traditional molding and casting methods might damage. We can even introduce 3D printing in our taxidermy dummies on which the tanned hides are mounted.

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Why Katy Perry Stopped Googling Herself https://deepwood.net/why-katy-perry-stopped-googling-herself/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 23:12:06 +0000 https://deepwood.net/why-katy-perry-stopped-googling-herself/ Throw down your sticks and your stones, but Katy Perry don’t let anyone break his soul. The pop star opened up about her restrained approach to social media in order to fend off unwanted interactions with haters and their opinions. In an interview with The cup posted on Oct. 24, the “Teenage Dream” singer shared […]]]>

Throw down your sticks and your stones, but Katy Perry don’t let anyone break his soul.

The pop star opened up about her restrained approach to social media in order to fend off unwanted interactions with haters and their opinions. In an interview with The cup posted on Oct. 24, the “Teenage Dream” singer shared what she does to avoid reading about herself on the internet.

“I stopped googling myself a long time ago and I don’t read comments. So if I’m on social media, I post and ghost,” Katy said. “I’m not going to open the door and invite the whole world to comment on how they think I should live my life.”

Instead of focusing on the negativity, Katy, who shares her 2-year-old daughter Daisy with fiance Orlando Bloom— is selective about who she welcomes into her life.

“I have a good group of trusted friends, I have a therapist, and we have a couples therapist, which is really helpful,” she explained. “So I’m very careful about letting other people’s energy in.”

Katy Perry through the years

In fact, prioritizing the relationships she loves unconditionally might cause Katy to lose some sleep, although the 38-year-old is more than happy to rearrange her schedule for Daisy.

“I really try not to stay up past 10 p.m. because I know my baby will be up at 6 a.m.,” Katy said. “Whether I put her to bed at seven, eight or nine, at six in the morning she’s up. So I have to count down the hours. The clock is ticking.”

Along with making sure she’s wide awake for her daughter, Katy has taken “mommy and me” classes with Daisy to continue to nurture a close bond with her. She added that when a woman thought she recognized her in a ballet class, Katy replied, “‘Hi, nice to meet you. I care about my child and I’m taking him to class.'”

She also goes to “all the museums,” telling the outlet that she and her daughter go to the “zoo, natural history museum, children’s museum. That’s my new club.”

Spending time with Daisy is always at the top of the list of “ET” singers, even if it means skipping time to exercise.

John Shearer/Getty Images for CMA

“I love hot yoga. I don’t do it every day because I have a kid and I want to spend every extra moment I have with him,” she said. “Sometimes I’ll have all day to be with her, but sometimes I’ll only have a few hours.

When she can have a minute to herself, Katy shared how the practice of Transcendental Meditation, or TM for short, “has profoundly changed my life.” Katy describes TM as a 20-minute meditation she started about 14 or 15 years ago, which is around the time her career took off when she signed with Capitol Records. The practice, she says, has helped his mental health.

“It’s given me more of a compass, more of an anchor. I can be too head in the clouds, think too much about the future, and that helps me be more present,” she said. declared. “I’ve dealt with depression and anxiety in my life, and TM is a huge tool.”

Besides meditation, Katy’s other self-care items include “that hurts so much” massages, physical therapy after concerts, car rides, or just admiring the sights and sounds of the cities while she runs. bike.

“I like to have a coffee and an empanada and just drink my coffee and eat my empanada while I’m on my bike,” she added, “People recognize me, but the moment they’re like, ‘ Was…? Who was…?’ I already left.”

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