History Museums – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 20:27:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://deepwood.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2-150x150.png History Museums – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ 32 32 Oracle Bones: A Story and a Metaphor https://deepwood.net/oracle-bones-a-story-and-a-metaphor/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 19:33:05 +0000 https://deepwood.net/oracle-bones-a-story-and-a-metaphor/ The beautiful press publication Oracle Os, recently published by Marriott Library’s Red Butte Press (RBP), was selected for the DesignArts2022 Utah exhibit at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art. The Utah Division of Arts and Museums and the Museum of Contemporary Art of Utah partner each year to make this design exhibition possible. The exhibition […]]]>

The beautiful press publication Oracle Os, recently published by Marriott Library’s Red Butte Press (RBP), was selected for the DesignArts2022 Utah exhibit at the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art. The Utah Division of Arts and Museums and the Museum of Contemporary Art of Utah partner each year to make this design exhibition possible. The exhibition will be on view until September 24.

Early in this project, author and activist Terry Tempest Williams and printer and wood engraver Gaylord Shanilec collected juniper and desert sandstone artifacts from southern Utah. Shanilec then shaped and planed these objects into printing plates, which staff at Red Butte Press (RBP) used to print the images for Oracle Os.

Tempest Williams’ partnership text is an urgent meditation on the vulnerability and power of the earth. The pictures in Oracle Os function both as archival documents and as landscape metaphors. A sequence of opaque and transparent pages suggests the desert horizon and the transformation of land over time. The color palette evokes the purples of distance and dusk, and the reds of earth and rock. Both conceptually and visually, the text responds to shapes and forms. The book’s landscape format and generous white space contribute to a feeling of open land and sky.

The RBP team made the cover paper from locally sourced cotton, abaca and yucca, adding sage on the back. For binding, single sheets were hinged then sewn with pamphlet stitch through a folded spine piece dyed with Utah-sourced ephedra and prickly pear. The images were printed in letterpress on a Vandercook SP20 on Goyu paper. The text – combined in Bell-type cast at The Bixler Press & Letterfoundry – was printed on a Colombian hand press on Magnani Pescia. The RBP contributors were Crane Giamo, chief printer and stationer; Marnie Powers-Torrey, master printer and production manager; Amy Thompson, designer; and Emily Tipps, lead binder and papermaker. Ruby Barrett, Annie Boyer, Jazmin Gallegos, Annie Hillam, Jonathan Sandberg and Sean Taylor provided studio assistance throughout all stages of production.

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The Real World Behind ‘Jurassic World’: How Dinosaur History Reflects Human History https://deepwood.net/the-real-world-behind-jurassic-world-how-dinosaur-history-reflects-human-history/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 23:30:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/the-real-world-behind-jurassic-world-how-dinosaur-history-reflects-human-history/ Humans remain fascinated by dinosaurs, which is why scientists have recently announced acclaimed findings that dinosaurs are warm-blooded or maintain a delicate coexistence with exotic plants. And that’s why, as the blockbuster “Jurassic World: Dominion” is unleashed in theaters, a quieter adventure is being told in libraries across America. Reuters Senior Reporter David K. Randall […]]]>

Humans remain fascinated by dinosaurs, which is why scientists have recently announced acclaimed findings that dinosaurs are warm-blooded or maintain a delicate coexistence with exotic plants. And that’s why, as the blockbuster “Jurassic World: Dominion” is unleashed in theaters, a quieter adventure is being told in libraries across America. Reuters Senior Reporter David K. Randall brings the world of early 20th century Western robber barons and adventurers to life in his new book, “The Monster’s Bones: The Discovery of T. Rex and How It Shook Our World.”

If history has a hero, it’s Barnum Brown, who made history by unearthing the first Tyrannosaurus rex fossils in the Montana wilderness. The hero’s foil is Henry Fairfield Osborn, a high-society eugenicist who competed with Brown to fill the American Museum of Natural History with dinosaur bones. It’s a harrowing tale, but with many sober moments of contemplation. For example, it’s hard to read this book and not notice how class, gender, race, and other social constructs determine the fate of these and other men in the tale. Randall’s skill as a writer is undeniable. “The Monster’s Bones” reads like a novel, with real scientific, political and social issues.

At the center of all this man-fuelled chicanery are the stars of the show – the dinosaurs themselves.

In the interview segment below, Salon explained to Randall why a pile of fossils can fuel so much drama — and serve as a focal point of human dreams, from museums to movies, all these years later.

The following transcript has been lightly edited for clarity and context.

I was wondering if you would be willing to elaborate a bit on what you would say was the feeling in the air for people like Osborn or Brown when they were engaged in their endeavors? What was the ideology, the philosophy, the feeling of the time?

One thing that struck me was the idea that science was for the first time seen as a social aspect. There is also a social aspect to science. It wasn’t just people who experimented and discovered the laws of nature. More so, how do these laws of nature affect human beings and affect society? So, with Osborn, his idea was that dinosaurs were a way to bring people to the Museum of Natural History. In many ways, that was almost the lure of the trap. If you bring people to the door, you can also expose them to some of his white supremacy theories on eugenics, in a subtle way.

Brown, on the other hand, was kind of the opposite. He was the idealistic part of the Golden Age. Where he says we have these resources and we have this idea that Earth’s history is much longer and stranger than anyone would have thought possible. So now let’s go and explore it. Let’s try to somehow master the Earth and its history in a certain way. And by doing that, he would basically go into the empty spaces of the map and see what was there. One thing that really struck me was that he was a college student…and he’s writing this letter saying, basically, I can find dinosaurs for you.


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I want to digress briefly from the discussion of your book. We’ll come back, but your book is about using dinosaurs for evil purposes. Now I have to mention the current blockbuster hitting cineplexes around the world, “Jurassic World: Dominion.”

Well, one thing struck me – and I haven’t seen the full movie yet, I’ve only seen a trailer – but with “Jurassic Park”, the first, the 1993 version, the dinosaurs really fulfill that sense of what our cultural concerns are right now. The new “Jurassic World” is like the idea that dinosaurs live among us and there’s this world where they’re not just in a park, they’re basically roaming free. They move around the world. In some ways, it seems to address our concerns about climate change. We got through science, we changed the earth, and now we have to deal with this monster, and we don’t know how to put the genie back in the bottle, basically.

Reuters Senior Reporter David K. Randall brings the world of early 20th century Western robber barons and adventurers to life in his new book, “The Monster’s Bones: The Discovery of T. Rex and How It Shook Our World.”

If you go back to the 1990s, “Jurassic Park” was the beginning of this sense of what technology could do. The Human Genome Project was in its infancy. Then very quickly, they cloned sheep like Dolly. It was this new age of computing and the dinosaurs really seemed to fill in this very neat metaphor for what science can do, and also the fears of science. I think dinosaurs as a whole, moving away from the “Jurassic” franchise, I think dinosaurs are basically this blank slate that we project our fears onto.

I want to come back to your book because you said that dinosaurs are a blank page on which we project our fears. You could also say that they are a blank page on which people project their ambitions. Isn’t that in many ways the theme of the book?

I think that’s a very fair point.

I think for someone like Brown, for sure, it was a way out of his life, or the life that was kind of passed on to him, as a person living on a farm in Kansas, that which is the last thing he wanted to do. Dinosaurs were a path to greater life. And you saw that for a lot of people in the book, the history of paleontology is filled with people who were looking for dinosaurs as a way to do something bigger… I think once they were put in museums, the public reaction to them was the first time you realized that this Earth is strange and natural history is strange. And there were these creatures that were much bigger than you and had teeth the size of your hand. Maybe it makes you feel diminished in a different way.

But it also inspires people to feel inspired. I think of little kids who love T. Rexes and Brontosaurus, and that’s because they’re fearsome. Have you ever thought of that? Why would little kids think that if T Rexes represent the pinnacle of human fear, that mm-hmm kids would view them with dread, as they view the concept of death with dread? In “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom”, the horrific scene where the dinosaur dies because the volcano explodes and everyone in the audience has tears in their eyes. People care about dinosaurs and feel inspired by them. And I feel like in “The Monster’s Bones” that feeling is captured as well.

I think that’s a good point.

I think “Jurassic Park” is interesting because people want to be in it until the safety mechanisms fail and then they come face to face with the T. Rex and all of a sudden it becomes a story quite different. I think kids love dinosaurs so much because in a way it’s an alien right in front of you being told that’s how the world works and that’s how it all was . And then all of a sudden you basically see what actual monsters were walking around. And this, I think, the dinosaurs represent the era of possibility at this age, of this sense of possibility as well, that life as it is right now is not what it always was, or may -Being will always be, that once upon a time, there were these huge creatures walking the Earth, and that has changed. So whatever circumstances you’re in right now, you can kind of lean on that to say, you know, life is changing.

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Estes Park Museum Friends & Foundation Latest Book Release | Spotlight on the Estes Valley https://deepwood.net/estes-park-museum-friends-foundation-latest-book-release-spotlight-on-the-estes-valley/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/estes-park-museum-friends-foundation-latest-book-release-spotlight-on-the-estes-valley/ Estes Park Museum Friends & Foundation, Inc. Press (EPMF&F Press) is pleased to announce a new book by Bob Leavitt, Estes Valley resident and Friends member. A History of the Southern Estes Valley with a Special Emphasis on Carriage Hills now available at the Estes Park Museum Gift Shop for $29.95. As always, Estes Park […]]]>

Estes Park Museum Friends & Foundation, Inc. Press (EPMF&F Press) is pleased to announce a new book by Bob Leavitt, Estes Valley resident and Friends member. A History of the Southern Estes Valley with a Special Emphasis on Carriage Hills now available at the Estes Park Museum Gift Shop for $29.95. As always, Estes Park Museum members receive a 10% discount.

A few years ago, Bob Leavitt looked down the southern Estes Valley and wondered how all this development started, especially his Carriage Hills neighborhood? Then one day a local historian said to Bob, “I think there was an old ranch in the southern Estes Valley. Later research by Leavitt confirmed that there was indeed an old ranch (the second in the Estes Valley) and identified the owner as James McLaughlin. Where exactly was it located and what happened to the ranch and its owner? To answer these and other questions, Bob spent several years researching the history of the southern Estes Valley. Follow his journey as he brings to light fascinating and untold stories of early colonization and subsequent development.

Most of Carriage Hills was once owned by the Earl of Dunraven as part of his famous land grab. The land passed through several owners until it was finally developed as the Carriage Hills housing estate. As the area expanded to several hundred homes, a fierce battle erupted over the city’s proposed annexation of Estes Park. Although annexation was ultimately rejected, it involved issues that still resonate today. Additionally, the book details the growth of Carriage Hills and nearby subdivisions from the 1960s through today and includes commentary and photos from longtime residents.

Bob and his wife Connie moved to Carriage Hills in 2014, along with their two golden retrievers. Leavitt has been a history buff for many years. He loves browsing museums and discussing history with anyone who has the same inclination.

The mission of the Estes Park Museum is to conduct activities that preserve, share and respect the unique history of Estes Park. For more information, call the Estes Park Museum at 970-586-6256 or visit the museum’s website. Museum Gallery Hours: Wednesday to Saturday, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

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4 Meaningful Ways to Observe Juneteenth This Year https://deepwood.net/4-meaningful-ways-to-observe-juneteenth-this-year/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 01:53:45 +0000 https://deepwood.net/4-meaningful-ways-to-observe-juneteenth-this-year/ Opal Lee, 95, is a retired educator, children’s book author and longtime humanitarian. In her hometown of Fort Worth, she runs a 13-acre urban farm and champions causes such as homelessness, education and health care. More broadly across the country, Lee is also considered the “grandmother of Juneteenth.” But as she once humbly said, “I’m […]]]>

Opal Lee, 95, is a retired educator, children’s book author and longtime humanitarian. In her hometown of Fort Worth, she runs a 13-acre urban farm and champions causes such as homelessness, education and health care.

More broadly across the country, Lee is also considered the “grandmother of Juneteenth.”

But as she once humbly said, “I’m just an old lady in tennis shoes minding everyone else’s business.”

Since 2016, Lee has traveled the country in these lace-up sneakers to push for national recognition of Juneteenth, which commemorates June 19, 1865. On that day, Union soldiers announced freedom to enslaved black people. in Galveston, Texas – more than two years after President Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation.

Last year, Lee’s efforts finally paid off when President Joe Biden signed legislation establishing June 19 as a federal holiday.

While millions of black Americans like Lee have long marked their freedom memorial day, others in the United States are still wondering how to meaningfully observe the new national holiday.

But activists say this recognition is important to everyone. “It’s not just a black holiday,” said Alicia Austion, executive director of the Juneteenth Foundation. “It’s a national holiday, an American holiday that we should all lean into and really recognize and support.”

We asked activists and organizers to share different ways Americans can honor Juneteenth.

Visit a local or national museum

Mary Elliott, curator of American slavery at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, emphasizes the educational value of museum experiences. For example, Elliot said, “The Slavery and Freedom exhibit is really great because we walk through this whole history from the beginning of slavery to Reconstruction. We also bring it to segregation and until today. So it allows you to look back and look forward.

She also highlights the importance of local museums, which can help visitors better understand the history of their own community. “Local history museums are hugely important because they make history more personal,” she said, because “one thing we learned with this story is that it’s very nuanced.”

For those unable to visit a museum in person this year, a handful of black museums and historical institutions across the country will participate in a virtual BLKFreedom.org program to commemorate Juneteenth.

Explore selected readings and documentaries

“Learn what Juneteenth is – that’s where you start,” said Cliff Robinson, who started the Juneteenth.com website about 25 years ago to offer information about national events.

“It’s like Veterans Day and Memorial Day,” he said. “Now is the time to stop and reflect on history, your own story or the story of a friend.”

Among his recommendations for researching this history is the work of James Baldwin, an acclaimed activist and writer who has written about racial injustice in America. “I think James is probably one of the most prolific people you can listen to in that regard,” Robinson said. In particular, he recommends “I Am Not Your Negro,” a 2016 documentary based on Baldwin’s unfinished manuscript “Remember This House,” which examines race relations in America based on Baldwin’s personal memories of civil rights leaders. Medgar Evers, Reverend Martin Luther King Jr and Malcolm X.

Elliott, the curator of the African American Museum, said documentaries can offer insight into specific events and eras of the black experience. “There are some great documentaries about Reconstruction, about slavery, about the Civil War,” she said, adding that viewers should also explore events after those times, like the Tulsa Race Massacre. . “They go into a bit of detail about what happened after the advent of freedom, because you can’t just look at that particular moment in time.”

Elliott also recommends examining the historical speeches and writings of activists like Frederick Douglass and prolific writers during the abolitionist movement. “Think of the poetry of the time as [that of] Frances Ellen Watkins Harper,” she said, “who writes beautifully about feelings, but also about history – what was going on at the time.”

Phillis Wheatley, credited as the first black poet published in America, is another name suggested by Elliott. His poetry explored questions like “What is slavery?” What is this desire for freedom?

Attend a celebration or party

Among the most common ways to recognize Juneteenth are celebrations and festivities, said Austion, whose Washington, DC-based foundation holds an annual festival around the holiday. This year’s event spans four days and includes a block party, golf tournament, virtual job fair and Father’s Day reception. “We were really founded to recognize Juneteenth,” Austion said, “but [also] truly celebrating more black excellence, black culture, global freedom for all.

Austion thinks the June 19 celebrations provide a time to reflect and recognize some of the major gains and accomplishments of the black community: “It’s worth looking at this holiday as a way of saying, ‘Because of this achieved freedom, all these other things could have happened. ”

This year, Austion is also encouraging people to explore the festivities in their own community. “In many places across the country, June 19 festivals are annual events,” she said. “You could go to just about any state and you’re going to find an organization that has a Juneteenth festival.”

Get involved in the community

Robinson, the creator of Juneteenth.com, advises people to know how to show up and support local black organizations, which can have a more direct impact in the community.

“Look locally and see who’s doing what in your town and find out how you can get involved, and if there’s no organization doing that, then consider creating an event,” said Robinson, whose website offers ideas for launching initiatives in local communities, as well as in the workplace. Robinson also launched a street sign campaign for neighbors to show solidarity. It’s a small gesture, he says, but it helps send a message of unity.

Another idea backed by Austion is to buy from black-owned businesses — a commitment she and her family have made for the month of June.

“There’s a huge opportunity to really create black wealth and empower a lot of what’s going on in our own community,” Austion said. “But where we can, for the month of June, we kind of try to lean into the black community and get things more directly.”

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Molina Family Latino Gallery is the most accessible Smithsonian attraction https://deepwood.net/molina-family-latino-gallery-is-the-most-accessible-smithsonian-attraction/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/molina-family-latino-gallery-is-the-most-accessible-smithsonian-attraction/ Placeholder while loading article actions The refugee boat is a punch. Tucked away in an alcove in the Molina Family Latino Gallery, the homemade raft carried two Cuban refugees, known as balseros, who risked their lives in 1992 in a harrowing escape from the waters of Cuba’s economic crisis. Imagining the makeshift ship on the […]]]>
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The refugee boat is a punch. Tucked away in an alcove in the Molina Family Latino Gallery, the homemade raft carried two Cuban refugees, known as balseros, who risked their lives in 1992 in a harrowing escape from the waters of Cuba’s economic crisis. Imagining the makeshift ship on the open sea is moving and forces viewers to confront the courage and despair of thousands of refugees.

The boat sits before images of a choppy ocean, the sound of the waves coming from a directional speaker overhead. Visitors who press an on-screen button can smell the sea air, and those who connect to the The gallery’s enhanced technology through a QR code can access the labels and wall text describing it.

A highlight of the exhibition “¡Presente! A Latino History of the United States,” which opens Saturday at the National Museum of American History, the exhibit offers an immersive experience for visitors of all skill levels, including those with disabilities. As part of the most accessible gallery on the Smithsonian’s sprawling campus, it represents a milestone in the institution’s commitment to all audiences.

“We took the decision very early on to make the gallery as accessible as possible. We felt it was the right thing to do,” said Eduardo Díaz, acting deputy director of the National Museum of the Latin American. “The ‘aha’ moment is that it made it better for everyone.”

Latino Museum supporters want the museum built on the Mall

The 4,500 square foot gallery will be the National Mall’s first permanent space dedicated to Latinos Americans, a growing segment of the national population. The gallery is the precursor to the National Museum of the American Latino, which Congress authorized in 2020 (along with the Smithsonian American Women’s History Museum). Smithsonian officials are to select the sites for the two museums by the end of the year, and their design and construction are expected to take at least a decade. The Molina Family Latino Gallery, on the first floor of the three-story National Museum of American History, will house the Latino Museum’s exhibits until its permanent home opens.

Improving the gallery’s accessibility is a response to the country’s changing demographics and increased emphasis on diversity. According to federal data, as many as 1 in 4 adults in the United States have some form of disability. The Latin American community has a higher percentage of people with disabilities than the general population, which makes accessibility even more vital. The aging of the US population is another factor; the Smithsonian wants to provide the best possible experience for seniors and multigenerational families who visit regularly, officials said.

“People with disabilities want to feel welcome rather than tolerated,” said Janice Majewski, director of inclusive cultural and educational projects at the Institute for Human Centered Design, an organization contracted by the Smithsonian to work on the design of the gallery. “It’s saying to the visitor without an appointment: ‘Welcome. We really want you here. ”

The national campaign for greater diversity and inclusion that has swept the country in recent years has also influenced the design, said Beth Ziebarth, director of Access Smithsonian. New exhibits at the National Air and Space Museum, slated to open in late fall, will build on the inclusive efforts of Latino exposure.

“If you’re not addressing access, you’re not providing inclusion. People with disabilities are part of diversity. They cross borders,” Ziebarth said.

Coronavirus closures and accusations of white supremacy: American art museums are in crisis

The exhibit focuses on the people, historical moments, and key concepts that exemplify the heritage of Latinos and Latina Americans. All material – text, subtitles and audio descriptions – is provided in English and Spanish.

The designers chose a very readable color palette and print font, as well as an easy-to-navigate physical layout. Sections covering colonial legacies, the expansion of the United States, and immigration stories run along its perimeter. Thirteen QR codes are scattered throughout, connecting a blind or visually impaired visitor’s smartphone and their text-to-speech software to the displayed text. The codes provide thematic introductions to the sections and descriptions of the main parts in each case. The system also offers information about the layout of the gallery and the location of the next code.

The numerous digital pieces in the exhibition are also accessible via a keyboard. The dozen oral histories of El Foro (the Forum), for example, familiar figures like journalist Maria Hinojosa and lesser-known ones like Ruby Corado, founder of Casa Ruby, a bilingual LGBTQ community center in Washington, and Nefertiti Matos, blind cultural accessibility consultant. Keyboards allow everyone to manipulate these digital displays.

Another major digital experience displays visual interpretations of demographic data, including trends in religion, higher education, and language. Interactive technology allows visitors to explore the data and learn, for example, the percentage of people of Latin American ancestry who identify as Hispanic, Latino, or Latino.

Ziebarth encourages sighted visitors to try the added technology, saying the audio adds a valuable layer of information.

“It allows you to focus on an object as the curator wishes,” she said.

A station at the entrance to the gallery explains how to use accessible technology. The keypads, which require wired headsets that must be plugged in at each stop, mirror the technology found in ATMs and airport kiosks, Ziebarth said, and visitors who are blind or visually impaired are familiar with it. A coordinator will be in the gallery from Wednesday to Sunday to help visitors who need help logging into the system; staff will provide inexpensive wired headsets for visitors who may not have them.

The keyboard technology doesn’t offer a wireless option, Ziebarth said, a fact that reveals the balance between work and the different levels of technology available to customers. Some smartphones and hearing aids are Bluetooth compatible, but many are not.

Tactile and olfactory experiences – including the smell of coffee at a domino table – enhance the visual displays, which also feature historical and contemporary biographies including Mexican American labor leader Cesar Chavez, Puerto Rican baseball player Roberto Clemente and Cuban American singer Celia Cruz.

As the first exhibition, “¡Presente!” offers a taste of what the future museum will add to existing Smithsonian content. It will also serve as a laboratory.

“You look at all the history, the art, the music, all the culture. It reinforces the idea that even with so many differences, we have so much in common,” said museum director Jorge Zamanillo, whose term began last month.

“It’s the core experience of the museum,” Zamanillo said, adding that he and his future staff will use the space to test content, ideas and technology. “It’s a big incubator. Imagine what we can do in 10 years.

¡Present! A Latin American History opens Saturday at the National Museum of American History, Constitution Avenue between 12th and 14th streets NW. americanhistory.si.edu.

Peter Wallsten contributed to this report.

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Philadelphia’s Best Souvenir and Gift Shops https://deepwood.net/philadelphias-best-souvenir-and-gift-shops/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 22:01:21 +0000 https://deepwood.net/philadelphias-best-souvenir-and-gift-shops/ Philadelphia, PA – If you feel like shopping for souvenirs, head to Old Town Philadelphia. Old Town’s souvenir and gift district is full of local artisan shops and specialty shops, while Philadelphia’s independents and Open House store are more unique and eclectic. This is the place to go if you’re looking for unique gifts for […]]]>

Philadelphia, PA – If you feel like shopping for souvenirs, head to Old Town Philadelphia. Old Town’s souvenir and gift district is full of local artisan shops and specialty shops, while Philadelphia’s independents and Open House store are more unique and eclectic. This is the place to go if you’re looking for unique gifts for the home or office.


Old City Philadelphia Souvenirs and Gifts

The Old City Souvenirs and Gifts is a great place to start if you’re looking for unique Philadelphia gift ideas. This small shop offers a variety of gifts and products at a reasonable price. The shop also offers unique and handcrafted items. Most of the items available are made by local artisans. Local artists make many items, including jewelry, ceramics, candles, and prints. Other items include greeting cards, t-shirts and baby gifts. 305 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19106

The Betsy Ross House

To commemorate your trip, choose a souvenir commemorating a historical event. The Betsy Ross House in Philadelphia’s Historic District is another unique souvenir you can purchase. The Betsy Ross Byers Choice doll and flag are handcrafted and made in the country. This is the perfect keepsake for anyone who loves Philadelphia history. You can even create your own Philadelphia gift for a loved one! 239 Arch St, Philadelphia, PA 19106

Philadelphia Independents

Philadelphia Independents is a great place to buy handmade souvenirs. This Old Town gift shop features some of its most talented local artists and products. The store offers handcrafted jewelry and accessories, ceramics, candles, prints and home decor. In addition to souvenirs, you can buy baby gifts, t-shirts, greeting cards, and more. There are also unique items available, some of which are only available in the city. 35 N 3rd St, Philadelphia, PA 19106








Xenos Candy N Gifts

Xenos Candy N Gifts is an eclectic gift shop with a unique mix of items including boxed chocolates, toys and t-shirts. The shop also offers unique Philadelphia souvenirs, including boxed chocolates. Gift shop staff can suggest unique and interesting items to purchase. A visit to this Philadelphia gift shop will give you a taste of the city’s unique culture. 231 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19106







The Museum of the American Revolution

If you’re thinking of buying souvenirs in Philadelphia, you’ve come to the right place! In addition to souvenir shops spread throughout Philadelphia, you can also find great items at museums and art galleries. The Museum of the American Revolution, for example, offers a gift shop with many things that honor the American Revolution. Some items in this shop include a canteen, a toy drum spirit from 1776, a pen and paperweights, as well as patches and sewing pins. Other museums and attractions offer souvenirs that can be given to friends and family. 101 S 3rd St, Philadelphia, PA 19106

Independence Visitor Center

Whether you’re looking for gifts for a friend or family member, you’ll find them at the Independence Visitor Center. The center houses several exhibits, including a large map of Philadelphia that outlines the city’s major historical markers. There is also an exhibit hall where you can get a glimpse of life in Philadelphia at the time. You will also discover the famous crack of the Liberty Bell, one of the most photographed symbols in the world. You’ll want to visit the cafe at the Independence Visitor Center if you have a few extra minutes. 599 Market St, Philadelphia, PA 19106







Ben Franklin Museum Gift Shop

If you are a history buff and love Franklin, you will want to visit the Ben Franklin Museum. The museum includes a gift shop, a replica of Franklin’s ghost house, and various exhibits about the man and his accomplishments. The museum gift shop is on the ground floor, inside the north entrance. It offers a selection of books, mugs, and other memorabilia inspired by the museum’s artwork. Visitors can also purchase custom face coverings that feature images of the museum’s artwork. 317 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19106

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‘Ramses the Great’ Egyptian Artifact Exhibit Coming to deYoung This Summer https://deepwood.net/ramses-the-great-egyptian-artifact-exhibit-coming-to-deyoung-this-summer/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 23:19:56 +0000 https://deepwood.net/ramses-the-great-egyptian-artifact-exhibit-coming-to-deyoung-this-summer/ A traveling exhibition of rare Egyptian artifacts, some discovered in recent years, will be on display at the deYoung Museum from August 20. It’s called Ramses the Great and the gold of the pharaohs, but many of the exhibits are not directly related to Pharaoh Ramses II, who ruled Egypt for 67 years and was […]]]>

A traveling exhibition of rare Egyptian artifacts, some discovered in recent years, will be on display at the deYoung Museum from August 20.

It’s called Ramses the Great and the gold of the pharaohs, but many of the exhibits are not directly related to Pharaoh Ramses II, who ruled Egypt for 67 years and was called Ramses the Great. His tomb was plundered centuries ago, in antiquity, but the exhibition will bring together the colossal royal sculpture of Ramses II, as well as objects of Ramses and objects found in other royal tombs of the time, such as animal mummies and other treasures discovered at Dahshur. and Tanis, and from the necropolis of Saqqara near ancient Memphis.

The deYoung is the exclusive West Coast location for the International Traveling Exhibit.

Ramses the Great and the gold of the pharaohs reveals the power and splendor of ancient Egypt and expands the story conveyed in our own collections of ancient art,” said Thomas P. Campbell, director and CEO of the Museums of Fine Arts of San Francisco ( FAMSF), in a press release. “Once the exhibition has completed its international tour, these objects will return to Egyptian museums and probably won’t travel again for decades.”

Ramses the Great reigned from 1279 to 1213 BC. AD, as the third pharaoh of the Nineteenth Dynasty of Egypt. He was known as a fierce military leader – and may have been the inspiration for the pharaoh depicted in the biblical story of Exodus. Ramses was also known for his monumental temples and monuments, including the so-called Ramesseum near Qurna.

The exhibition includes 180 objections, including jewelry, grave goods, mummies, etc.

“Ramses the Great is considered the most famous and powerful pharaoh of the new kingdom,” Renée Dreyfus, a longtime curator of ancient art for museums, told The Chronicle’s Datebook. “It was Egypt’s golden age, and that meant he oversaw a very wealthy and powerful empire. The exquisite sculpture and grand architecture, the monumental temples he built for himself and for the gods, were destined for the ages.”

Dreyfus adds that this exhibit includes high-tech aspects, including drone footage of actual monument sites and an immersive video room that will give museum visitors a better sense of the scale of the buildings Ramses built during his lifetime. .

In 2009, deYoung hosted the extremely popular exhibition Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs, which had 130 objects, some from the tomb of King Tut – who was part of the previous dynasty before Ramses II, the eighteenth.

Ramses the Great and the gold of the pharaohs opens August 20 and closes February 12, 2023. Tickets for museum members go on sale June 22 and for the general public July 6.

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Rainbow museums can protect buildings, ensure peace, rid history of biased writing, writes Shivaji Sarkar https://deepwood.net/rainbow-museums-can-protect-buildings-ensure-peace-rid-history-of-biased-writing-writes-shivaji-sarkar/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 04:56:07 +0000 https://deepwood.net/rainbow-museums-can-protect-buildings-ensure-peace-rid-history-of-biased-writing-writes-shivaji-sarkar/ The Prime Minister recently launched Pradhan Mantri Sangrahalaya on the occasion of Dr Ambedkar’s birthday on April 14, 2022. | Photo: Parveen Negi There is churning. The monuments or sanctuaries captured, rebuilt or demolished by force have aroused emotions, apprehensions, doubts, societal and economic uncertainties. Only harmony can revive the fortunes of the country. Shouldn’t […]]]>

The Prime Minister recently launched Pradhan Mantri Sangrahalaya on the occasion of Dr Ambedkar’s birthday on April 14, 2022. | Photo: Parveen Negi

There is churning. The monuments or sanctuaries captured, rebuilt or demolished by force have aroused emotions, apprehensions, doubts, societal and economic uncertainties. Only harmony can revive the fortunes of the country. Shouldn’t we build Rainbow Harmony houses or museums to preserve heritage and present them as the beginning of a new dawn?

Yes, the country needs harmony to boost the economy and preserve the hard historical process. The rainbow is the color of beauty and harmony in Indian society. Its absence has a severe impact, perhaps in terms of billions. After partition, armed gangs periodically attacked majority areas in many states. The 1986 Shankh Naad for Ram Janmabhoomi experienced a thaw. On the march he witnessed the demolition of the ancient Babri temple or structure, much against the wishes of Atal Bihari Vajpayee, LK Advani, archaeologist Swaraj Prakash Gupta and many Sangh luminaries, followed by marches, court cases, decisions and reconciliation for the temple and the mosque. The structure reminiscent of the historical power process is demolished. Gyanvapi raised ripples again.

RSS leader Mohan Bhagwat’s recent call, “Don’t look for Shivling in every mosque” is significant in addition to his assertion that all Indians have DNA. He is right to say that the Bamiyan Buddha explosions hurt everyone.

There is an agreement. Those who rake in the matter through court gates or otherwise and their opponents who have possession of the premises know the reality – these have been forcibly occupied and destroyed. Even prominent AMU Professor Irfan Habib, an expert on the matter, says it was part of past power games and demolitions are a reality. Absolutely right. Swarja Gupta in the middle of the demolition of Babri recovered important doorposts and other important inscriptions.

None, however, wants to give it up, be it Gyanvapi, Mathura or Bhojshala. Whether Gyanvapi has a Shivling or not, it would be difficult to culminate in another Vishwanath temple. According to the religious ethos, there should not be two shrines to one deity in one enclave. How would the sites taken over by Mathura be used? Such questions haunt all structures. The cost of maintaining social order remains high.

The solution to the Indian economy remains difficult. Inflation – retail at 7.79% and wholesale at 15.1% – is high. A small reduction in the additional excise duty on petroleum is a small relief. RBI pegs growth at 7.2%. Emotions and societal aberrations can interfere with the process.

Interestingly, the Gyanvapi cases begin with the Places of Worship Act 1991, the law which prohibits changes in the religious character of a shrine as it stood on August 15, 1947. It was demolished on September 2, 1669, by order of the Mughal ruler Aurangzeb. . A court in Varanasi ordered the Archaeological Survey of India to survey the structure.

The Gyanvapi case is now encouraging the staking of claims to occupied structures for prayers, including the Taj Mahal in Agra, the Qutub Minar in Delhi and Lord Krishna’s birthplace, Mathura. He also stoked passion in Srirangapatna in Karnataka for the recovery of a Jamia Mosque and many other monuments.

Courts can follow the Ayodhya judgment process. Those who want possession act with emotional vengeance to restore them. Perhaps another phase of renovation, demolition and reconstruction may follow. It’s all about ego, passion and historical reality. This will not end the conflict. In the process, the economy, which is not in a happy shape, may thaw if not regress, conflicts, confusion and mutual mistrust may grow, and the nation may see volatile reactions. How much could the loss be? It depends on the intensity or lack thereof.

Shouldn’t she then be abandoned by those who possess and be possessed by aspirants? Certainly. All should come forward to create the preservation of the Harmony Museum. It is a composite culture. Be it Varanasi, Mathura, Moradabad, Meerut, Aligarh or any UP city, one community, somewhere Hindu the other Muslim, is the investor and the other provides the labor or the logistics. There is interdependence. A little uncertainty would put these places and many others in disarray. Community pressure prevents them from taking the supposedly rational step. None, including Habib, dare to speak.

Should Gyanvapi or other monuments like Mathura or Bhojshala suffer the same fate as the old Ram Lalla structure? It doesn’t have to be. These are property disputes. No member of the current generation assigns them. No one recognizes Aurangzeb or other tyrants. No one has the courage to oppose it openly either. Such situations impacted the working atmosphere in Varanasi, either out of exuberance or apprehension. The losses are unfathomable. It erodes society.

The cost of the Ram Janmabhoomi movement is difficult to estimate. But if the court cases of the three parties – the Sunni Waqf Board, Nirmohi Akhara and the Ram Lalla Virajman, separate arguments, law and order expenses, occasional violence or tensions in society are taken into account. account, that would be huge. The court cases alone would have cost millions. Add to that the many disruptions due to state-wide curfews, the riots in Mumbai, Aligarh and others, trains not stopping or stopping completely, business upheavals, the careful avoidance of members of different communities who depended on each other for sustenance and loss of wages. since 1991 – are not easy to understand. There were also losses of life. Now billions of rupees are also being poured into reconstruction. The divide remains clear, although RSS leader Mohan Bhagawat says the communities share the same DNA.

The path to solution may be simple but may not be easy to accept. The Quub complex, which is also in the eye of the storm, offers a way out. Inscriptions in the complex indicate that 27 temples were demolished. The ASI plate also mentions it.

They are heritage monuments. If the goods are handed over to one of the groups again, another process of distortion is likely to begin. The hurt feelings would get worse. Again, if documentations and evidence are lost, it can repeat the story of emotional outbursts in the future.

Once the problems of the shrines of Varanasi and Mathura are resolved, many such sites in other states could become part of the heritage harmony circuit by agreeing to preserve them as centers of representation of living history and of the reconciliation process.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi has built a magnificent museum of prime ministers. If leaders of Hindu and Muslim communities were asked to have an agreed solution to preserve them as centers of heritage or melting pots of living history, it would rid the process of history writing of its biases. A harmonious process of community interaction can begin at these sites under the Archaeological Survey of India. These living museums of structures could be dubbed “Rainbow Harmony Houses or Museums” as places to interact and usher in a new era.

This New India would invite people around the world to experience the new way Indians can solve critical social problems that Northern Ireland’s walls of peace could not.

(The writer is a seasoned journalist, socio-political economy observer and media scholar)

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A virtual tour offers an inside look at the New Palmer Museum of Art https://deepwood.net/a-virtual-tour-offers-an-inside-look-at-the-new-palmer-museum-of-art/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 16:10:49 +0000 https://deepwood.net/a-virtual-tour-offers-an-inside-look-at-the-new-palmer-museum-of-art/ Aerial view of the new Palmer Museum of Art depicted in a 3D animated flyover. Image by Allied Works | Brooklyn Digital Foundry Penn State’s new Palmer Museum of Art won’t open until spring 2024, but you can take a detailed look inside and out right now. A recently released flyover animation, produced in collaboration […]]]>

Aerial view of the new Palmer Museum of Art depicted in a 3D animated flyover. Image by Allied Works | Brooklyn Digital Foundry

Penn State’s new Palmer Museum of Art won’t open until spring 2024, but you can take a detailed look inside and out right now.

A recently released flyover animation, produced in collaboration with Allied Works and the Brooklyn Digital Foundry, provides an immersive 3D view of the museum’s new home currently under construction next to the Arboretum.

The two-and-a-half-minute video explores the $85 million facility, a 71,254 square foot facility that will double the museum’s exhibition space to 20 galleries.

“The flyover animation brings the essence of the new museum building to life and reveals the strategic goal of connecting art, nature and architecture,” Palmer Museum Director Erin Coe said in a statement. communicated. “It accurately captures many distinctive architectural features and finishes, including the beautifully variegated sandstone cladding, the metallic lenses on the windows, and the interlocking, sinuous design of the new building which contains both artwork and views about nature, providing visitors with a sense of wonder and well-being as they walk through the Museum, as if walking through the Arboretum grounds.

Penn State Board of Directors final plans approved for the new building in May 2021 and construction has started last July, followed by a groundbreaking ceremony in August.

In addition to the galleries, the new museum will have educational spaces, a shop, a café, an event space opening onto a courtyard with a view of the Arboretum, outdoor terraces and sculpture walkways.

The building will have two wings clad in local stone. The larger wing on the west side is for galleries and museum support spaces, while the east wing will have administrative and educational facilities.

The wings have an open space between them offering a direct view of the Arboretum and are connected to the second level by an enclosed walkway. It is designed to connect to the landscape with interior and exterior courtyards and be a gateway to the Arboretum.

With more space for educational opportunities and its location off Park Avenue away from the central campus, university officials said the new facility will be more accessible and increase visitation.

The new museum is part of a vision of a cultural districtfirst presented by former Penn State President Eric Barron to the board in 2016, to be developed at the Arboretum, with the possibility of other university museums moving to facilities on the site with a new STEM museum, performance spaces, education center, planetarium and winter garden, in a series of connected or semi-connected buildings.

The stream Palmer Art Museum will be reused for academic uses that have not yet been announced.

Celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2022, the museum will present several exhibitions at its current home on Curtin Road this autumn, including two that look at the museum’s past and future.

“Looking Who We Are: The Palmer at Fifty,” which runs September 23 through December 23. 18, builds on Penn State’s “We Are” acclaim and signals an introspective reckoning as the museum marks this historic milestone.

“With a selection of paintings, drawings, prints, photographs and sculptures from the permanent collection, the exhibition explores how history, place and community shape our understanding of museums and of ourselves,” according to a press release. . “It invites viewers to take a broader look at personal and cultural identity through the lens of specific works of art and to consider how collections are formed and institutional histories are written.”

“Designed for the Future: The New Palmer Art Museum at the Arboretum,” introduced at the same time, will allow visitors to experience the design of the new building through the model, drawings, plans, renderings and l animation of the architect.

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In California, Elena Gross is incoming co-director of the Berkeley Art Center, which champions Bay Area artists and curators https://deepwood.net/in-california-elena-gross-is-incoming-co-director-of-the-berkeley-art-center-which-champions-bay-area-artists-and-curators/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:03:43 +0000 https://deepwood.net/in-california-elena-gross-is-incoming-co-director-of-the-berkeley-art-center-which-champions-bay-area-artists-and-curators/ IN BERKELEY, CA, Elena Gross joined the Berkeley Art Center (BAC) as co-director. Gross brings eight years of experience working in the Bay Area arts community and experience that spans museums, culturally specific institutions, commercial galleries, independent nonprofits, and arts publications. Gross is currently Director of Exhibitions and Curatorial Affairs at the Museum of the […]]]>

IN BERKELEY, CA, Elena Gross joined the Berkeley Art Center (BAC) as co-director. Gross brings eight years of experience working in the Bay Area arts community and experience that spans museums, culturally specific institutions, commercial galleries, independent nonprofits, and arts publications.

Gross is currently Director of Exhibitions and Curatorial Affairs at the Museum of the African Diaspora (MoAD) in San Francisco.

The Berkeley Art Center describes itself as a “diverse, intergenerational community” and a “center for artistic exploration and community development that champions the work of Bay Area artists and curators.”

The non-profit organization adopted a co-director model in 2021 with the express intention of creating leadership opportunities for emerging arts professionals. “In a small organization like ours, all tasks are shared and so we thought the responsibility for decision-making should also be shared,” outgoing co-director Daniel Nevers said in a statement. He started as director of the BAC in 2018.

“We are thrilled to have Elena join the Berkeley Art Center at such a pivotal time as we deepen our collaboration with artists and curators to create a vibrant, community-based venue for local contemporary art,” the board chair said. BAC Board of Trustees Kerri Hurtado in a statement. . “We’ve seen during the pandemic how our space has been both a sanctuary and a hub for connection, and we’re excited about the insights and values ​​that Elena will bring to our efforts to build community.”

A freelance writer and cultural critic, Gross joined MoAD in 2019 as an associate of exhibitions and was promoted to director of exhibitions and curatorial affairs last year. During her tenure, she held solo exhibitions with local Bay Area artists, including “Sam Vernon: Impasse of Desires” and “Cynthia Aurora Brannvall: The Threads That Bind,” as part of the initiative of the emerging artists of the museum. Gross also co-hosted “David Huffman: Terra Incognita.” All three exhibitions are currently on view at MoAD, where Gross has also participated in public programs and artist conferences.

Previously, Gross worked for approximately three years as a gallery associate at the Fraenkel Gallery, a San Francisco commercial gallery specializing in photography.

At St. Mary’s College of Maryland, Gross earned a Bachelor of Arts in Art History and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (2008-12). She then obtained a master’s degree in visual and critical studies at the California College of the Arts in San Francisco (2014-16).

“I have seen firsthand the vibrancy and rigor of the Bay Area’s arts ecosystem and am committed to keeping these communities alive and thriving.” —Elena Gross

Entering the next chapter of his career, BAC offers Gross the opportunity to hone his leadership skills and continue his work with local artists.

“Community art spaces are a vital, but rapidly disappearing, cultural asset. Over the past few years, I have had the pleasure and opportunity to work with so many emerging and mid-career artists in the Bay Area, working in a variety of disciplines and with varying practices and expertise. Gross in a statement. “I have seen firsthand the vibrancy and rigor of the Bay Area’s arts ecosystem and am committed to keeping these communities alive and thriving.”

Working alongside co-director Kimberley Acebo Arteche, Gross is responsible for developing and driving BAC’s strategic vision and reimagining how the arts center can better serve the local community. It officially begins on June 21.

“For equity to advance within historically white arts organizations, the demographics of decision makers must reflect the demographics of the communities they wish to serve,” Arteche said in a statement. “I’m so excited to be part of an organization that has gone beyond words to meaningful action to support emerging leaders of color, and I look forward to working with Elena to bring our next phase to life.” CT

TOP IMAGE: Elena Gross. | Courtesy of BAC

READ MORE about Elena Gross on her website

BOOKSHELF
Elena Gross is co-editor of the recently published book “OutWrite: The Speeches that Shaped LGBTQ Literary Culture”.

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