History Museums – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 16:36:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://deepwood.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2-150x150.png History Museums – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ 32 32 NIU today | NEH grant to NIU will help preserve history in institutions nationwide https://deepwood.net/niu-today-neh-grant-to-niu-will-help-preserve-history-in-institutions-nationwide/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 15:03:02 +0000 https://deepwood.net/niu-today-neh-grant-to-niu-will-help-preserve-history-in-institutions-nationwide/ For centuries, important cultural materials – from books, historical documents and letters to photographs, sculptures and paintings – may have been stored, only to be rediscovered at some point in the future. However, as Jaime Schumacher of Northern Illinois University Libraries points out, many contemporary materials that could be used by future generations to understand […]]]>

For centuries, important cultural materials – from books, historical documents and letters to photographs, sculptures and paintings – may have been stored, only to be rediscovered at some point in the future.

However, as Jaime Schumacher of Northern Illinois University Libraries points out, many contemporary materials that could be used by future generations to understand us are now only digital in nature, including videos, photos, communications on social networks, blogs, works of art, reports, music. , articles and emails.

“Preserving these materials for future access is a complex challenge,” said Schumacher, Director of Scholarly Communications at NIU Libraries and internationally recognized for her expertise in preserving digital materials. She and her NIU colleague, Drew VandeCreek, have worked for the past decade to help NIU and other institutions nationwide preserve digital materials of cultural value.

Today, the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) is giving a major boost to their efforts.

NEH awarded the pair a $349,000 grant to provide training for archivists as part of NIU Libraries’ Digital POWRR project, short for Preserving Digital Objects with Restricted Resources. The project, which has already trained hundreds of professionals in medium and small institutions, focuses on the preservation of digital documents that increasingly constitute large parts of library, archive and museum collections.

“This new grant will focus on helping organizations that serve cultural heritage institutions in underrepresented communities, including Native American, Latino and Black communities,” Schumacher said.

“These records that are created and held by individuals and organizations from underrepresented communities are particularly at risk of loss due to long-term systemic inequities in the distribution of resources and opportunities,” he said. she adds. “Larger, well-funded organizations have long-standing funding sources and access to technical skill sets that allow their digital documents to be stored and stored securely. People working in many historical societies, tribal archives, local museums and other smaller-scale cultural heritage organizations lack the funding and special skills needed to organize and preserve their unique digital records.

In total, the Digital POWRR project has now attracted a total of approximately $1.4 million in federal funding support, with previous grants coming from the NEH and the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The project, which began at NIU and is now also affiliated with Arizona State University, has trained 520 professionals from 367 institutions, 35 states and the District of Columbia, and 10 Native American tribes and cultural heritage institutions.

“Digital materials are very prone to loss for a number of reasons,” said VandeCreek, director of digital grants for NIU Libraries.

“The media on which they are stored can fail or be damaged by a natural disaster or accident,” he said. “The software format in which they were created and stored may also become obsolete. In some cases, data stored on intact storage devices can be compromised by seemingly random failures known as bit rots.

Digital materials, like their physical counterparts, can be invaluable. Schumacher recalls a training event held on the lands of the Confederate Tribes of Warm Springs in the Pacific Northwest. A member of a tribal nation approached the formation asking for help with a box of tapes containing recordings of tribal elders speaking in their native language.

“Only a few Elders were still living, and their language was in danger of being lost with their passing,” Schumacher said. “At the POWRR event, we were able to provide critical digital preservation training and help them formulate a plan to rescue legacy media recordings, perform initial preservation actions on the recordings, and create a workflow to preserve the recordings of their elders. in the future.”

New NEH funding will support the development, planning and presentation of five professional development events discussing how to introduce measures to improve levels of digital preservation into existing library, archive and museum workflows . The three-day events each serve 30 practitioners. Two will be held at NIU Naperville, two at Arizona State University, Tempe, and one at Oklahoma State University.

Institutional professionals will be trained to programmatically transfer documents to a central and backed up storage system, establish workflows for their ongoing preservation, and monitor their integrity using free and open source software to facilitate their efforts. Each professional receives one-on-one consultations to identify gaps in their current processes and create longer-term preservation plans. The project also provides a peer group of fellow practitioners who face similar challenges, resulting in a community of practice with a built-in support system.

Frederick Barnhart, Dean of NIU Libraries, said he was proud of NIU’s leadership role in the Digital POWRR project.

“By helping other libraries and museums use open source software and tools to organize and share their unique collections, we all benefit and gain greater access to culture and history that might otherwise remain hidden,” Barnhart said.

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8 technological innovations that are becoming the norm in museums and heritage sites https://deepwood.net/8-technological-innovations-that-are-becoming-the-norm-in-museums-and-heritage-sites/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 14:58:47 +0000 https://deepwood.net/8-technological-innovations-that-are-becoming-the-norm-in-museums-and-heritage-sites/ For better or for worse, the museum and heritage sectors are in something of a technological arms race, from reception to flagship exhibition. With the introduction of new innovations comes a debate about how best to take the technology from novelty to a valuable storytelling device. Here, Advisor showcases some of these technologies, as they […]]]>

For better or for worse, the museum and heritage sectors are in something of a technological arms race, from reception to flagship exhibition.

With the introduction of new innovations comes a debate about how best to take the technology from novelty to a valuable storytelling device. Here, Advisor showcases some of these technologies, as they move from proof of concept to real-world examples.

Projection mapping transforms spaces large and small

When projected onto walls, ceilings, floors and objects, projection mapping allows existing surfaces to come to life with virtual content that can be viewed by users near or – scaled to walls of the building – seen from afar.

The technique can be used to highlight existing features in historic buildings, bring specific shapes and structures to life, and illuminate custom-built structures for an installation.

As an alternative to screens in a multimedia exhibition, or as an enhancement system for existing facades, the creation and installation of a projection mapping will require custom construction and installation.

Recent use cases include the Van Gogh exhibition at Manchester’s MediaCity, which relies heavily on projection mapping to fill otherwise empty walls with video.

In another example, Harewood House and its “Luminescence” projection mapping installation by multimedia artists Dave & Kristin McGuire. Part of the exhibition “A Night At The Mansion”, it will win Innovation of the Year at the Museums + Heritage Awards in 2020.

Binaural technology adds an immersive layer to audio

Binaural audio is a type of audio specifically recorded over two channels to reflect two human ears, to mimic the effect of immersive sound during playback.

The technique replicates the way humans naturally hear sounds by creating the effect of actually hearing sound in a space. This creates an immersive experience that allows museum visitors to feel part of the exhibit. In other words, binaural audio allows visitors to “hear” in 3D.

Among the museums that use the technology is the Met. His Visitors to Versailles the exhibit included helmets that visitors could wear.

Instead of traditional expert commentary on specific objects, this binaural audio experience is “animated” by actors representing royalty, ambassadors, architects, travel writers and tourists as they journey through an open carriage from Paris to Versailles.

“Digital twins” preserve and reproduce delicate objects

The concept of “digital twin” extends to the photography of 3D objects. Photogrammetry – the process of taking both photos and volumetric data – enables the creation of a virtual model that can be digitized and then exists in 3D space.

It is a process that benefits the preservation of physical objects by freezing them at a given time as part of a digital archive. But it also allows visitors to satisfy the urge to pick up and manipulate objects.

Companies such as London’s Form Capture offer on-site object scanning and have worked with companies such as the British Museum – alongside Nike and Google – to create 3D captures.

This technique is also used by the Anglo Sikh Museum’s collection of virtual objects, which can not only be rotated and moved in 3D in a browser, but also have ‘hotspots’ providing additional information.

Contactless donations in a cashless society

The coronavirus has all but depleted physical cash, and that’s a problem for museums and heritage attractions hoping to make the most of visitors’ spare change as they enter or exit.

But just as contactless payments are expected in retail, contactless donations are now the most convenient way to give. The People’s History Museum (PHM) in Manchester is among the museums embracing tap-to-give technology. Via GoodBox, a technology company specializing in tap-to-give contactless donation stations, the museum is able to increase donations and continue to engage with visitors while keeping entry free in a society cashless.

Additionally, PHM reports that new digital donation statistics allow it to think more strategically about how visitors give. Since installing the technology, he’s found that visitors donate the most during the weekend, particularly between 1 and 2 p.m.

Holographic screens add an extra dimension to the visuals

Among the museums using technology to its fullest is the Los Angeles Holocaust Museum, which launched a life-size hologram of Holocaust survivor and fashion designer Renee Firestone. Firestone was filmed with a set of cameras answering questions, and the resulting videos were converted into a hologram that is a permanent installation called “Dimensions in Testimony”, created by the USC Shoah Foundation, a nonprofit organization based in Los Angeles founded by Steven Spielberg.

A more affordable option is holographic fan display technology, which uses a rotating LED bar to give the illusion of a floating object. The technology was used by display company Virtual On to create Dr WHO-themed holograms at an event at the British Film Institute (BFI).

Applications as an all-knowing tour guide

A digital layer on top of existing screens without requiring multimedia investment, a channel through which to keep in touch with visitors, and more prescient in recent years as a digital alternative to those unable to visit in person.

Among the places to adopt app guides, and following in the footsteps of the Central Park Conservancy, Black Cultural Archives, is Yorkshire Sculpture Park (YSP) which has collaborated with Bloomberg Philanthropies to produce a digital guide accessible via the Bloomberg app Connect.

The app allows visitors to discover content and access information about the artworks featured by YSP, answer questions from a typical paper guide, and provide film and audio content.

At the YSP, an audiovisual guide to Joana Vasconcelos’ landmark exhibition Beyond and stand-alone works by Alfredo Jaar, Kalliopi Lemos, Jaume Plensa, RAQS Media Collective, Ursula von Rydingsvard and William Tucker are available.

The existing technology developed by the Bloomberg Connects app skips the often costly hurdle of building an app from scratch. But the major museums have decided to create their own distinct offer.

Among them is The History of Science’s Pocket Curator app, which offers more interactive ways to explore the Museum, with animations, audio commentary and interactive demonstrations of museum objects.

Virtual reality as a gateway to virtual museums

The Curatours virtual museum platform opens its first “Plastic Museum”

While AR/VR is an established technology that is reshaping the way museums and exhibits are presented, it is now being leveraged to create entire virtual museums with multiple exhibits.

Last year, the first such “virtual museum” was launched on the virtual reality platform Curatours, which was specifically designed for experiences in museums and galleries.

Part of the British Council’s Creative Commissions programme, which explores climate change as part of The Climate Connection Global initiative, the virtual ‘Plastics Museum 2121’ is based on an imagined future 100 years from now, in which efforts to reduce the use of plastic have been effective.

It’s part of what should be a long list of virtual museums on the platform, opening doors for a new breed of museum curators, new opportunities to create experiences in a world without a budget, and social interaction with d other virtual users who might be on the other side of the globe.

Visitor Flow Technology Makes People Tracking Smarter

Museums use visitor flow technology to understand how people experience their exhibits. The data is used to improve the visitor experience by providing content that matches visitor interests and helping museums organize their collections to better meet visitor needs. This new approach changed the museum landscape forever.

The Museo dell’Opera del Duomo in Siena is among those that have embraced new technology to facilitate this process, which can be achieved through tracking wi-fi connections, online ticketing and, in the case of the Museo de Italian art, through the installation of 3D sensors.

Using Xovis’ people counting sensor technology, which provides the same service to the retail and transportation industries, sensors and technology can automate the flow of people, enabling better routing and better reports.

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LIST: Virginia’s top-rated specialty museums, according to Tripadvisor (3 are in Richmond!) https://deepwood.net/list-virginias-top-rated-specialty-museums-according-to-tripadvisor-3-are-in-richmond/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 23:08:59 +0000 https://deepwood.net/list-virginias-top-rated-specialty-museums-according-to-tripadvisor-3-are-in-richmond/ (STACKER) — Specialty museums, or museums focused on a single theme, exist all over the United States and cover many niches. Have you visited the one dedicated to ventriloquism? Since Virginia is known for its long history and unique attractions, it’s no surprise that it’s also home to specialty museums interesting for everything from Richmond’s […]]]>

(STACKER) — Specialty museums, or museums focused on a single theme, exist all over the United States and cover many niches. Have you visited the one dedicated to ventriloquism?

Since Virginia is known for its long history and unique attractions, it’s no surprise that it’s also home to specialty museums interesting for everything from Richmond’s favorite poet, Edgar Allan Poe, to quilts and pinball machines.

According to Tripadvisor, these are the highest rated specialist museums in the Commonwealth. Read below and get ready to plan your road trip.

#30. Virginia Civil War Museum

– Rating: 4.5/5 (208 reviews)
– Address: 8895 George Collins Pkwy, New Market, VA 22844
– Website

#29. Blue Ridge Music Center

– Rating: 4.5/5 (217 reviews)
– Address: 700 Foothills Rd, Galax, VA 24333
– Website

#28. Virginia Music Museum

– Rating: 5.0 / 5 (52 reviews)
– Address: 6316 Richmond Rd, Williamsburg, VA 23188
– Website

#27. Believe it or not from Ripley!

– Rating: 3.5/5 (322 reviews)
– Address: 1735 Richmond Rd, Williamsburg, VA 23185
– Website

#26. Lynchburg Museum

– Rating: 4.5/5 (96 reviews)
– Address: 901 Court St, Lynchburg, VA 24504
– Website

#25. Historic Church and Museum of St. Luke

– Rating: 5.0 / 5 (458 reviews)
– Address: 14477 Benns Church Blvd, Smithfield, VA 23430
– Website

#24. Virginia Quilt Museum

– Rating: 4.5/5 (125 reviews)
– Address: 301 S Main St, Harrisonburg, VA 22801
– Website

#23. USS Monitoring Center

– Rating: 5.0 / 5 (100 reviews)
– Address: 100 Museum Dr Part of Mariners Museu, Newport News, VA 23606
– Website

#22. Smithfield Plantation

– Rating: 4.5/5 (100 reviews)
– Address: 1000 Smithfield Plantation Rd, Blacksburg, VA 24060
– Website

#21. Roanoke Pinball Museum

– Rating: 4.5/5 (137 reviews)
– Address: 1 Market Sq SE 2nd Floor, Roanoke, VA 24011
– Website

#20. Explore more of the Discovery Museum

– Rating: 5.0 / 5 (121 reviews)
– Address: 150 S Main St, Harrisonburg, VA 22801
– Website

#19. Birthplace of Country Music Museum

– Rating: 5.0 / 5 (272 reviews)
– Address: 101 Country Music Way, Bristol, VA 24201
– Website

#18. US Army Transportation Museum

– Rating: 4.5/5 (200 reviews)
– Address: 300 Washington Blvd., Besson Hall Fort Eustis, Newport News, VA 23604
– Website

#17. Walton Mountain Museum

– Rating: 4.0 / 5 (244 reviews)
– Address: 6484 Rockfish River Rd, Schuyler, VA 22969
– Website

#16. Cooter in Luray

– Rating: 4.5/5 (168 reviews)
– Address: 4768 US Highway 211 W, Luray, VA 22835
– Website

#15. Virginia Holocaust Museum

– Rating: 4.5/5 (408 reviews)
– Address: 2000 E Cary St, Richmond, VA 23223
– Website

#14. Virginia Transportation Museum

– Rating: 4.5/5 (682 reviews)
– Address: 303 Norfolk Ave SW, Roanoke, VA 24016
– Website

#13. Edgar Allan Poe Museum

– Rating: 4.0/5 (503 reviews)
– Address: 1914 E Main St # 16, Richmond, VA 23223
– Website

#12. Stonewall Jackson Headquarters

– Rating: 4.5/5 (259 reviews)
– Address: 415 N Braddock St, Winchester, VA 22601
– Website

#11. The Car and Caravan Museum

– Rating: 4.5/5 (803 reviews)
– Address: 970 US-211, Luray, VA 22835
– Website

#ten. Edith Bolling Wilson Birthplace Museum

– Rating: 4.5/5 (95 reviews)
– Address: 145 E Main St, Wytheville, VA 24382
– Website

#9. George Washington’s Mount Vernon

– Rating: 4.5/5 (4,640 reviews)
– Address: 3200 Mount Vernon Memorial Highway, Mount Vernon, VA 22121
– Website

#8. NRA National Firearms Museum

– Rating: 4.5/5 (394 reviews)
– Address: 11250 Waples Mill Rd, Fairfax, VA 22030
– Website

#seven. Nautical

– Rating: 4.5/5 (1,062 reviews)
– Address: 1 Waterside Dr, Norfolk, VA 23510
– Website

#6. Steven F Udvar-Hazy Center

– Rating: 5.0 / 5 (4,389 reviews)
– Address: 14390 Air and Space Museum Pkwy, Chantilly, VA 20151
– Website

#5. Virginia Air and Space Science Center

– Rating: 4.0 / 5 (530 reviews)
– Address: 600 Settlers Landing Rd, Hampton, VA 23669
– Website

#4. White House of the Confederacy

– Rating: 4.5/5 (1,239 reviews)
– Address: 1201 E Clay St, Richmond, VA 23219
– Website

#3. Sailors Museum and Park

– Rating: 5.0 / 5 (911 reviews)
– Address: 100 Museum Dr, Newport News, VA 23606
– Website

#2. Military Aviation Museum

– Rating: 5.0 / 5 (1,314 reviews)
– Address: 1341 Princess Anne Rd, Virginia Beach, VA 23457
– Website

#1. Fort Monroe Casemate Museum

– Rating: 4.5/5 (530 reviews)
– Address: 20 Bernard Rd Ingalls Road, Hampton, VA 23651
– Website

Stacker compiled this list of top-rated specialty museums in Virginia from Tripadvisor.

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History has always “clicked” with him https://deepwood.net/history-has-always-clicked-with-him/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 06:06:19 +0000 https://deepwood.net/history-has-always-clicked-with-him/ HASTINGS, Neb. (AP) – Dan Brosz’s interest in history, nature and museums began early in life. Brosz, 44, began working as the new collections curator at Hastings Museum in December 2021. “Our family vacations were either national parks or museums as a destination, or usually both,” he said. “If I wasn’t dragged into a national […]]]>

HASTINGS, Neb. (AP) – Dan Brosz’s interest in history, nature and museums began early in life.

Brosz, 44, began working as the new collections curator at Hastings Museum in December 2021.

“Our family vacations were either national parks or museums as a destination, or usually both,” he said. “If I wasn’t dragged into a national park visitor center, I was into Chicago’s big museums. They were always stops for us. Until I got tired, it was still a pleasant experience.

He grew up in a family whose parents both loved history.

“Just hearing stories of family history and background—growing up in the Cold War and all the Cold War movies that came out in the ’80s and popular culture—sparked my interest in ‘Why the United States Doesn’t don’t they like the Soviet Union? he told the Hastings Tribune. “History has always clicked with me. What kid doesn’t love going to the dinosaur museum? It also opens the door to other museums and has led to an appreciation for art and art museums and art history.

Looking back, he doesn’t know which came first, the love of museums or the love of history.

“They probably both fed each other and made me the history buff I am today,” Brosz said.

This interest led Brosz to pursue a degree in history at Northern State University in his hometown of Aberdeen, South Dakota.

“I had very good teachers who took me under their wing and gave me direction,” he said. “I was involved in the history club there.”

The club visited the South Dakota State Historical Society, which allowed them to learn about some of the careers available at museums.

Brosz received a master’s degree in museum studies from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He also completed the Executive Certificate in Nonprofit Leadership and Management from the University of Notre Dame.

His professional experience includes working as a registrar at the National Model Aviation Museum in Muncie, Indiana; curator of collections at the South Dakota State Historical Society; and Director of Arts in Communities with the North Carolina Arts Council.

He was recently joined in Hastings by his wife, Jennifer, and daughter, Hannah.

Jennifer has a background in historic preservation. The couple worked at the same State Historical Society building in South Dakota and again in North Carolina.

Hannah is a kindergarten student at Adams Central Elementary.

Brosz served as president of the South Dakota Museum Association and served on numerous regional and national committees. His main subjects of interest are the history of the Northern Great Plains, the history of the United States of the 20th century, and the cultures and histories of the Indigenous peoples of the Northern Plains.

As Curator of Collections, Brosz will help plan the museum’s upcoming permanent exhibits, as well as expanding storage of the museum’s collections.

“It’s both exciting and intimidating,” he said.

It is still acclimatizing to the museum’s storage collection.

“Teresa (museum director Teresa Kreutzer-Hodson) and Jess Noyd (museum registrar) have done a great job over the years identifying and cataloging everything,” he said.

Brosz knew the Hastings Museum and several staff members before applying for the job.

He has known many of the Hastings Museum staff for nearly 10 years through their mutual involvement in the Mountain-Plains Museum Association.

“I knew them and had been here on tour in 2012 or 2013 when the conference was in Lincoln,” he said. “I was really impressed with the museum. It was a place when it came time to look and see what was going on there and this work opened up, I saw myself working there. People are great. The museum is great. I was looking to get back into the museum realm, and (when) this opened up, it was like, ‘This could be fun.’ ”

Brosz was one of two out of three candidates already known to museum officials.

Brosz’s qualifications stood out from Kreutzer-Hodson.

“Dan’s experiences and talents in his previous jobs really shined through,” she said. “We just thought he would fit very well into our team and fill niches that we don’t currently have, especially with grant writing.”

She said another aspect that helped Brosz rise to the top of the nominees was her knowledge of the legal issues museums face, such as the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, loan agreements , copyright and title transfer. Along with the grant experience, this was an important factor in her selection.

“He has a very solid background in managing and caring for collections,” she said. “He has worked with education departments and exhibition departments before. He really had that baggage, but he also had the cultural baggage. He is strong in cultural history. This is another key element that we looked at and helped us decide it would be a better fit. We don’t have to practice a lot with him.

Brosz will succeed Kreutzer-Hodson as curator of the collections.

Kreutzer-Hodson, a long-time museum employee, was appointed director of the museum by Hastings City Council on July 12, 2021. She served as interim director following the departure of former director Becky Matticks.

“So far so great and I can’t imagine it not being great because of the type of person Teresa is and coming in knowing that my predecessor was doing it right and she built the foundations, it will make my job easier,” Brosz said. .

Kreutzer-Hodson is confident in Brosz’s abilities.

“I’ve been at the museum for 25 years, and 24 and a half worked exclusively in his position,” Kreutzer-Hodson said. “It’s a bit difficult to let go of your baby, but I think Dan will do just fine. I try to be the resource for him but not to hinder him. He has his own ideas about how he wants to adopt some of the management practices, all of which are consistent with professional development standards in our field. »

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Rail historians raise $ 25,000 for space to restore trains and ultimately become an NJ museum https://deepwood.net/rail-historians-raise-25000-for-space-to-restore-trains-and-ultimately-become-an-nj-museum/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/rail-historians-raise-25000-for-space-to-restore-trains-and-ultimately-become-an-nj-museum/ Historic trains from New Jersey’s past find a place to be slowly restored to their former glory. But first, this place needs some work. Railroad historians have begun raising funds to equip a building in Boonton that would be where the United Railroad Historical Society plans to restore some of the 65 historic trains representing […]]]>

Historic trains from New Jersey’s past find a place to be slowly restored to their former glory. But first, this place needs some work.

Railroad historians have begun raising funds to equip a building in Boonton that would be where the United Railroad Historical Society plans to restore some of the 65 historic trains representing the history of the state’s railways.

This is a step on the path to New Jersey’s goal of having its own State Transportation Museum, a dream historians have pursued for 40 years.

At the end of last month, UHRS moved into a 6,600 square foot building in the small storage yard it has rented from NJ Transit since 2007 and which houses most of the company’s collection. For the first time in 37 years of history, the UHRS has an indoor space to work on its trains, instead of an outdoor space, said Kevin Phalon, president of the company.

The latest acquisition, a locomotive that circulated the streets of Hoboken before waterfront industries were replaced by condos and townhouses, was kept last year and will be on display at UHRS facilities. This year.

Now the building is just an empty shell and far from the restoration workshop the organization would like it to be. UHRS launched a fundraiser of $ 25,000 to equip the building with the basics – lights, paving, electricity, compressed air system, internet and security system, he said.

“This $ 25,000 would cover all the essentials on this list,” he said. “We would need more than that to continue building other parts of the store and purchasing store equipment. “

The building, recently vacated by a tenant, would allow UHRS members to work on the equipment inside as efficiently as possible, Phalon said. This will also allow them to stabilize the trains awaiting restoration against further deterioration of the elements.

A pair of Pennsylvania Railroad GG-1 electric locomotives, which served NJ Transit after its formation, have been aesthetically restored by the United Railroad Historical Society in Boonton, as seen at an open house in 2014 Guided tours of the collection could resume this summer.

“These old trains are deteriorating every day they wait outside to be fixed,” he said. “A simple paint job can add decades to the life of any car or locomotive in this job. “

Donations can be made to URHS online at UHRS.org/donate or by mail at 104 Morris Ave. Boonton, NJ 07005. Future plans for the building include the acquisition of more shop machinery such as lathes, a milling machine and other metalworking tools to equip. a “soon to be a machine shop,” said Erik Stenzel, UHRS chief mechanic.

“We have gradually brought together the many pieces from our collection here,” said Phalon. “Currently there are 50 locomotives and cars in the yard. We expect 10 more pieces of equipment to finally return to Boonton in 2022. “

Part of the building will also be used for UHRS offices and as a “welcome base” to maintain the Hickory Creek, a restored New York Central Railroad observation car and the lounge car at Tavern # 43. , both artefacts from the rationalized train era of the 1940s and 1950s.

Rail historian gets interior home for vintage trains

The old Twentieth Century Limited Hickory Creek observation car leaves Poughkeepsie NY on one of the many fall foliage train trips the United Railroad Historical Society has taken this fall on tracks along the Hudson River. One of the group’s treasures is the restored Hickory Creek.

Both cars are part of the UHRS Hudson River Rail Tours which wrapped up fall foliage tours on the Hudson River last year that were so popular that the first set of trips sold out in 8 minutes online.

The ultimate goal of UHRS is to build a 50-acre transportation museum in the state, with an indoor exhibition building and education center and track so people can take the restored trains, a t -he declares. Such operating railway museums exist in other states, as close as Pennsylvania, which opened its State Railway Museum in 1975.

“We will never be able to reach this point without conserving the artifacts that we have,” he said. “That is why this restoration building in Boonton is not only beneficial, but necessary.”

A permanent museum of transportation in New Jersey has been an elusive goal, studied since 1980, but not achieved. The UHRS came close to this goal in 2005, when it found a 35-acre site in Phillipsburg. But this site was used for waterfront development instead.

“New Jersey missed that, and it shouldn’t be so,” Phalon said. “We have the history and we have the artifacts. We just need some space.

Meanwhile, the UHRS and other railway museums and historical societies have stocked old trains, many of which were donated by NJ Transit after replacing old equipment from previous railroads. The UHRS has done an impressive job, cosmetically restoring various locomotives and trains to their past splendor.

People could see them again this summer when the UHRS first opens its guided tours facility. In the past, he organized an open house in the fall.

“It is our top priority that the public can see and enjoy the trains here in Boonton,” said Phalon. “We’re so excited to finally be able to do it. We will sell tickets on our website once the dates are set. “

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Larry Higgs can be reached at lhiggs@njadvancemedia.com.


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Giant fossil found in Nevada is the first of its kind https://deepwood.net/giant-fossil-found-in-nevada-is-the-first-of-its-kind/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 22:30:21 +0000 https://deepwood.net/giant-fossil-found-in-nevada-is-the-first-of-its-kind/ A report released by CBS News on December 23 noted that an 8-foot-long skull recently discovered in the Augusta Mountains of Nevada is the largest fossil ever found from its time. The Augusta Mountains are located approximately 75 miles southeast of Winnemucca, Nevada, in Churchill, Lander, and Pershing counties. The research team believe this remarkable […]]]>

A report released by CBS News on December 23 noted that an 8-foot-long skull recently discovered in the Augusta Mountains of Nevada is the largest fossil ever found from its time.

The Augusta Mountains are located approximately 75 miles southeast of Winnemucca, Nevada, in Churchill, Lander, and Pershing counties.

The research team believe this remarkable discovery could provide insight into how modern whales developed and how to preserve their presence in the oceans.

The report said the scientists claimed, “The fossil – a recently discovered species of ichthyosaur, a type of large aquatic reptile – dates to around 246 million years ago. The new cymbospondylus youngorum is, according to the research team, the largest animal found around this time, both in the sea and on land. It currently holds the title of the first giant animal to ever live on Earth. “

CBS News said the well-preserved skull was excavated along with part of the creature’s spine, shoulder, and forefin. At over 55 feet long, the ichthyosaur was estimated to be the size of a large sperm whale, according to the study by the American Association for the Advancement of Science and Los Angeles County Natural History Museums .

Scientists said the ichthyosaur had an elongated snout and tapered teeth, which led researchers to believe it ate squid and fish. He could also have hunted smaller marine reptiles and younger members of his species.

Dr Jorge Velez-Juarbe, associate curator of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, said cymbospondylus youngorum is “a testament to the resilience of ocean life after the worst mass extinction in Earth history. “, he added.

Lend Delsett and Nicholas Pyenson, who wrote the report for the Natural History Museum, said: “The history of ichthyosaurs tells us that ocean giants are not guaranteed features of marine ecosystems, which is a valuable lesson for all of us. Especially if we are to maintain the presence of the surviving ocean giants among us who contribute to our own well-being. “


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Top Rated Museums in Oregon | KOIN.com https://deepwood.net/top-rated-museums-in-oregon-koin-com/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 01:39:04 +0000 https://deepwood.net/top-rated-museums-in-oregon-koin-com/ PORTLAND, Oregon (KOIN) – Whether it’s the Oregon Trail or outer space, Oregon’s museums have something for everyone. Here are 30 museums across the state to inspire, inform, and enjoy. Stacker has compiled a list of Oregon museums on Tripadvisor. #30. Warm Springs Museum – Note: 4.5 / 5 (63 reviews)– Type of activity: History […]]]>

PORTLAND, Oregon (KOIN) – Whether it’s the Oregon Trail or outer space, Oregon’s museums have something for everyone.

Here are 30 museums across the state to inspire, inform, and enjoy. Stacker has compiled a list of Oregon museums on Tripadvisor.

#30. Warm Springs Museum

– Note: 4.5 / 5 (63 reviews)
– Type of activity: History Museums
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 29. Oregon Territory Museum

– Note: 4.5 / 5 (40 reviews)
– Type of activity: Natural History Museums, History Museums
– Address: 211 Tumwater Dr, Oregon City, OR 97045-2900
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 28. Flavel House-Museum

– Note: 4.5 / 5 (579 reviews)
– Type of activity: Specialty museums
– Address: 441 8th St, Astoria, OR 97103-4620
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 27. Tillamook Air Museum

– Rating: 4.0 / 5 (573 reviews)
– Type of activity: Specialty museums, Historic sites
– Address: 6030 Hangar Rd, Tillamook, OR 97141-9641
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 26. Heritage Station Museum

– Note: 4.5 / 5 (48 reviews)
– Activity type: Historic sites, History Museums
– Address: 108 SW Frazer Ave, Pendleton, OR 97801-2138
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 25. Seaside museum and historical society

– Note: 4.5 / 5 (31 reviews)
– Type of activity: History Museums
– Address: 570, promenade Necanicum, seaside, OR 97138-6040
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 24. ScienceWorks interactive museum

– Note: 4.5 / 5 (177 reviews)
– Activity type: Specialty Museums, Science Museums
– Address: 1500 E Main St, Ashland, OR 97520-1312
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 23. Erickson aircraft collection

– Note: 5.0 / 5 (66 reviews)
– Type of activity: Specialty museums
– Address: 2408 NW Berg Dr Madras Municipal Airport, Madras, OR 97741-2081
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 22. Oregon Observatory at Sunriver

– Note: 5.0 / 5 (211 reviews)
– Type of activity: Observatories & Planetariums
– Address: 57245 River Road, Sunriver, OR 97707
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 21. Oregon National Historic Trail Interpretive Center

– Note: 5.0 / 5 (614 reviews)
– Type of activity: History Museums
– Address:
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 20. Oregon Museum of Science and Industry

FILE – The Oregon Museum of Science and Industry in Portland, Oregon (KOIN)

– Note: 4.5 / 5 (1,640 reviews)
– Type of activity: Specialty museums
– Address: 1945 SE Water Ave, Portland, OR 97214-3356
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 19. Oregon Trail End Interpretive Center

– Note: 4.0 / 5 (185 reviews)
– Type of activity: Specialty museums
– Address: 1726 Washington St, Oregon City, OR 97045-1058
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 18. Dee Wright Observatory

– Note: 4.5 / 5 (103 reviews)
– Type of activity: Observatories & Planetariums
– Address: McKenzie Hwy, Blue River, OR 97413
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 17. The historic carousel and the museum

– Note: 5.0 / 5 (248 reviews)
– Type of activity: Specialty museums
– Address: 503 1st Ave NW, Albany, OR 97321-2229
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 16. Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Museum

– Note: 4.5 / 5 (407 reviews)
– Type of activity: Specialty museums
– Address: 5000 Discovery Dr, The Dalles, OR 97058-9755
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 15. Oregon State Hospital – Museum of Mental Health

– Note: 4.5 / 5 (72 reviews)
– Activity type: Specialty Museums, History Museums
– Address: 2600 Center St NE, Salem, OR 97301-2669
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 14. Gilbert House Children’s Museum

– Note: 4.5 / 5 (187 reviews)
– Type of activity: Specialty museums
– Address: 116 Marion St NE, Salem, OR 97301-3437
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 13. Western Museum of the Ancient Airplane and Automobile

– Note: 5.0 / 5 (411 reviews)
– Type of activity: Specialty museums
– Address: 1600 Air Museum Rd 1600 Air Museum Road, Hood River, OR 97031-9800
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

Portland Art Museum. May 4, 2020 (KOIN)

# 12. Portland Art Museum

– Note: 4.5 / 5 (1,155 reviews)
– Type of activity: Specialty museums
– Address: 1219 SW Park Ave, Portland, OR 97205-2486
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 11. Columbia River Maritime Museum

– Note: 4.5 / 5 (1,792 reviews)
– Type of activity: Specialty museums, Bodies of water
– Address: 1792 Marine Dr, Astoria, OR 97103-3525
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

#ten. Evergreen Aviation and Space Museum

– Note: 4.5 / 5 (1,540 reviews)
– Type of activity: Specialty museums
– Address: 500 NE Captain Michael King Smith Way, McMinnville, OR 97128-8877
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 9. Hatfield Marine Science Center

– Note: 4.5 / 5 (697 reviews)
– Type of activity: Science museums, Educational sites
– Address: 2030 SE Marine Science Dr, Newport, OR 97365-5296
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 8. Tamastslikt Cultural Institute

– Note: 4.5 / 5 (213 reviews)
– Type of activity: Natural History Museums
– Address: 47106 Wildhorse Blvd, Pendleton, OR 97801-6111
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

#seven. Klamath County Museum

– Note: 4.5 / 5 (133 reviews)
– Type of activity: History Museums
– Address: 1451 Main St, Klamath Falls, OR 97601-5989
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 6. Glass forge

– Note: 5.0 / 5 (287 reviews)
– Type of activity: Art galleries
– Address: 501 SW G St, Grants Pass, OR 97526-2472
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 5. Rice NW Museum of Rocks and Minerals

– Note: 4.5 / 5 (187 reviews)
– Activity type: Specialty Museums, Natural History Museums
– Address: 26385 NW Groveland Dr, Hillsboro, OR 97124-9351
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 4. Reverse seaside experience

– Note: 5.0 / 5 (76 reviews)
– Type of activity: Specialty museums
– Address: 111 Broadway St Suite 11, Seaside, OR 97138-5817
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 3. Camp 18 Museum

– Note: 4.5 / 5 (330 reviews)
– Type of activity: History Museums
– Address: 42362, route 26, bord de mer, OR 97138-6162
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 2. Lincoln City Glass Center

– Note: 5.0 / 5 (519 reviews)
– Type of activity: Art galleries
– Address: 4821 SW Highway Suite 101, Lincoln City, OR 97367
– Learn more on Tripadvisor

# 1. High Desert Museum

– Note: 4.5 / 5 (1,932 reviews)
– Type of activity: Specialty museums
– Address: 59800 S Highway 97, Bend, OR 97702-7963
– Learn more on Tripadvisor


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Digital copies of the famous sword sell out in seconds https://deepwood.net/digital-copies-of-the-famous-sword-sell-out-in-seconds/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 02:46:37 +0000 https://deepwood.net/digital-copies-of-the-famous-sword-sell-out-in-seconds/ By CHEN MEILING in Beijing and LIU KUN in Wuhan | China Daily | Update: 2022-01-04 09:24 A visitor compares the digital version of Gou Jian’s sword on his mobile phone with the one on display at the Hubei Provincial Museum in Wuhan, Hubei Province. CHINA DAILY Internet users are starting to appreciate the virtual […]]]>

By CHEN MEILING in Beijing and LIU KUN in Wuhan | China Daily | Update: 2022-01-04 09:24

A visitor compares the digital version of Gou Jian’s sword on his mobile phone with the one on display at the Hubei Provincial Museum in Wuhan, Hubei Province. CHINA DAILY

Internet users are starting to appreciate the virtual value of online versions of historical artifacts

Historical artifacts are generally priceless, fragile, and should not be touched. But nowadays curious visitors can view them, play with them, and make them part of their personal collections, all for just 19.90 yuan ($ 3.10).

At the end of October, digital versions of Gou Jian’s sword, one of China’s most important historical artifacts, which has retained its sharpness and whose patterns remain clear after more than 2,000 years, sold out in seconds. .

Since its discovery in Hubei Province in 1965, the sword has been one of the prizes on display at the Hubei Provincial Museum in Wuhan, the provincial capital. Covered with delicately engraved inscriptions, mysterious black diamond patterns, and blue and turquoise inlays, it is an example of the advanced design and production techniques used to craft weapons during the spring and fall period ( 770-476 BC) and originally belonged to a famous king of the State of Yue.

The digital version, co-developed by the museum and tech giant Alibaba, retains all of the details of the original. Viewers can zoom in on a perfectly restored version after paying the 19.90 yuan fee through the Alipay platform.

“Over 600,000 people rushed to buy 10,000 digital copies of the sword, which sold out in three seconds!” Wang Xianfu, deputy director of the museum, said, adding that he did not expect the offer to be so popular. “I didn’t even have one for myself.”

The sword on display at the museum. CHINA DAILY

The idea of ​​digital replica is a concept based on the use of NFTs, or non-fungible tokens, which give each electronic work an authentication certificate using blockchain technology. As each DFT is unique and cannot be duplicated, buyers can prove ownership. To date, the technology has been applied to a number of different items including artwork, audio tracks, videos, and games.

Wang said that because most people don’t get the chance to admire the artifacts up close, a digital copy transcends the limits of time and space, allowing history buffs to avoid crowds and inspect objects whenever they want.

“Also, it’s easier to view an artifact on your phone than through a storefront,” he said. “It is becoming a trend for museums to develop digital replicas, which are an important contribution to creative and cultural products, and also help promote traditional culture in ways that young people appreciate. “

Han Shijun, a resident of Wuhan, was more than ready to purchase her own digital copy of the famous sword.

“In the past, I only saw artifacts in cupboards, and most of the time, not very clearly. Technology can also restore artifacts, which brings me closer to the story,” she said.

Wang Yitao was not so lucky. “It sold out before I knew it,” he said.

But the sale piqued his interest and he then bought four digital reproductions. “It’s interesting, and the parts are not expensive,” he said. Indeed, many are sold between 9.90 and 25.90 yuan.

Li Jialu, another Wuhan resident, said that although the object was virtual, “owning Gou Jian’s sword looked cool.”

In recent years, many Chinese museums have produced digital reproductions. In September, the Shaanxi History Museum released three images based on the front, back, and 3D images of its most significant artifact, the Tiger Tally, which was used during the Warring States Period (475-221 BC). .-C.) To mobilize the armies.

In November, the Chengdu Museum uploaded digital versions of its famous stone rhinos to Alipay, and in the same month, 10,000 digital versions of the Small Wild Goose Pagoda and Bell Tower, two important heritage buildings in Xi’an, in Shaanxi province, were also sold.

Zhu Jianxiong, who heads the digital collections division at AntChain, part of the Ant Group, a subsidiary of Alibaba, said that since October, around ten museums, including the provincial museums of Hunan, Hubei, Henan, from Hebei and Anhui, produced digital replicas. , and more than a million Internet users have made purchases. The platform posted 237 different articles.

This new art form aims to introduce the ingenuity and skills of the ancient artisans who made these precious relics to a younger audience, as well as to encourage a greater appreciation of Chinese culture in daily life, said Zhu, adding that the company hopes to boost digital appreciation. cultural relics for both their cultural and technological value.

To avoid speculation, the platform prohibits exchanges between Internet users but allows buyers to donate items purchased after 180 days. China is committed to promoting the protection and exhibition of cultural artifacts through technology during the 14th Five-Year Plan period (2021-25), said Wu Yuanbin, director general of science and technology. for social development at the Ministry of Science and Technology. beginning of November.

Xia Zengming, a professor at the Huazhong University of Science and Technology in Wuhan, said digital replicas help make connections between buyers and the characters and stories related to the artifacts, making it easier to raise awareness of the story.

Plus, collectors don’t have to go anywhere to complete their collections or worry about buying a fake. “It gives them pleasure and promotes development in culture and tourism sectors at the same time,” Xia said.


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The pedestal of the Robert E. Lee statue in the Virginia capital has been completely removed https://deepwood.net/the-pedestal-of-the-robert-e-lee-statue-in-the-virginia-capital-has-been-completely-removed/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 16:26:39 +0000 https://deepwood.net/the-pedestal-of-the-robert-e-lee-statue-in-the-virginia-capital-has-been-completely-removed/ The pedestal of the Robert E. Lee statue in Richmond, Va. Was removed entirely on Friday, ending a divisive saga over a Confederate memorial that has dominated the city for 130 years. By the end of New Years Eve, workers had hauled each piece of the 40-foot-high pedestal away from Monument Avenue and leveled the […]]]>

The pedestal of the Robert E. Lee statue in Richmond, Va. Was removed entirely on Friday, ending a divisive saga over a Confederate memorial that has dominated the city for 130 years.

By the end of New Years Eve, workers had hauled each piece of the 40-foot-high pedestal away from Monument Avenue and leveled the ground. No part of the statue, first erected in 1890, had remained standing on Saturday morning.

Mike Spence, the project’s construction supervisor overseeing 21 workers, told local news channel ABC 8 that his team spent 1,300 hours getting up and down scaffolding to remove stones and transport them.

“The hours are the blood, sweat and tears of it,” Spence said, according to the outlet.

Crew workers also helped find and remove two time capsules, one of which was described in a 19th century newspaper article and contained historical artifacts including books, coins and ammunition. , during the withdrawal process. One of the capsules was found in the pedestal and the other below.

The statue is one of many commemorations of former Confederate generals that have been withdrawn in recent years amid a nationwide reckoning over history and race.

A proposal to bring down a similar statue of Lee in Charlottesville, Va., In 2017 prompted opponents of his withdrawal to stage the murderous “Unite the Right” rally, in which white supremacists chanted “You shall not replace us. », Before confronting each other. with the counter-demonstrators.

After George Floyd died in Minneapolis in 2020, plans to remove the Richmond statue began before he was tied up in court. The Virginia Supreme Court ruled in September 2021 that it could be removed, and the statue was removed from the pedestal days later.

The 21-foot statue of Lee is heading towards the Black History Museum and Cultural Center of Virginia in Richmond, NPR reported.

“Symbols matter, and for too long, Virginia’s most important symbols have celebrated the tragic division of our country and the camp that fought to keep the institution of slavery alive by any means possible.” Virginia Governor Ralph Northam said in a statement to NPR.

“Now it will be up to our thoughtful museums, informed by the people of Virginia, to determine the future of these artifacts,” Northam continued.



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The best museum exhibits in Houston this month: January 2022 https://deepwood.net/the-best-museum-exhibits-in-houston-this-month-january-2022/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 12:00:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/the-best-museum-exhibits-in-houston-this-month-january-2022/ “Time is no longer” by Anri Sala | Photo: Lawrence Knox; Courtesy of Buffalo Bayou Partnership and Weingarten Art Group Catch the latest exhibits and installations at art galleries and museums in Greater Houston in January 2022. The New Year has plenty of exciting exhibits on the horizon, including the reopening of the Moody Center, […]]]>

“Time is no longer” by Anri Sala | Photo: Lawrence Knox; Courtesy of Buffalo Bayou Partnership and Weingarten Art Group

Catch the latest exhibits and installations at art galleries and museums in Greater Houston in January 2022.

The New Year has plenty of exciting exhibits on the horizon, including the reopening of the Moody Center, but first, the city’s galleries and museums have a list of exhibits set to release this month.

Among several Houston institutions, you can make time to stop by closing the Lawndale Art Center, MFAH, Menil Collection, and Buffalo Bayou Park Cistern Cave facilities.

Plus, you can check out all of the current exhibits by checking out our guide to facilities and exhibits in Greater Houston.

First look: Exhibitions open in Houston this month

Detail from “Always & Forever (ever, ever) No. 8” by Tammie Rubin | Photo: Hector Martinez; courtesy of the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft
  • Arch gallery in Montrose | FREE – The Dunlavy art gallery welcomes Public shows by Joel Anderson this month (opening Saturday January 8), which takes the viewer on a walking tour of some of Houston’s most captivating gardens, parks and public spaces, capturing different types of beauty through photographic painting techniques and with encaustic.
  • Houston Contemporary Craft Center in the Museum District | FREE – Three exhibitions open at the HCCC; Unlimited (opening Saturday, January 15) explores themes of identity, acculturation and belonging through the versatile clay works of three recipients of the ClayHouston Award for Texas BIPOC Ceramic Artists; Rings! 1968-2021 (opening Saturday January 22) tells about the avant-garde twists and turns of contemporary jewelry that have allowed the unlimited creative potential of the wearable piece; and Nothing is lost (opens Saturday, January 29) shows how an artist can use found materials, leftovers and discarded remains to explore how industrial and artistic processes have impacted the ecology of the planet.
  • The Bryan Museum in Galveston – The Galveston History Museum is gearing up for Shrove Tuesday with Mardi Gras: pageantry and festivities (opens Friday, January 21), which delves into the history of Mardi Gras and the Galveston Krewes that make up the colorful and cheerful exhibits that parade through the city each year. Included with general admission, $ 14; $ 5 for ages 6 to 12; Free for children 6 and under.
  • Moody Center for the Arts at Rice University | FREE – Reopening after a month-long installation process, Rice University Art Gallery presents Soundwaves: Experimental strategies in art and music (opening Friday January 21), bringing together the works of artists like Jamal Cyrus, Anri Sala, Christine Sun Kim, Jorinde Voigt and others to examine the links between visual and acoustic art and provide a space for sensory exploration.

Check out other installations and exhibits currently in the museums of Greater Houston.

Save on day and multi-day passes to museums around Houston

Last chance: Exhibitions in Houston close this month

“Niki de Saint Phalle in the 60s” | Courtesy of the Menil Collection
  • Lone Star Flight Museum at Ellington Field – The museum of the history of space and aviation closes its exhibition, Never forget: commemoration of the 20th anniversary of September 11 (ends Sunday, January 2), which offers visitors the opportunity to commemorate the nearly 3,000 people who perished in the terrorist attacks of September 11, as well as to leave their feelings and thoughts in a guestbook that will be donated to the National 9/11 Museum and Memorial in New York. $ 15; $ 13 for ages 12 to 17 and 65 and over; $ 10 for ages 4 to 11; free for children 3 and under.
  • Archway Gallery in Montrose | FREE – Juxtapose the pieces of two artists, Fusion: new works by Veronica Dyer and Jim Adams (ends Thursday, January 6), this exhibit contrasts the positive energy found in Veronica Dyer’s paintings and sculptures created during the lockdown, and the darker aspects of the human experience found in the recent work of the sculptor Jim Adams, “Personal Demons”.
  • Houston Contemporary Craft Center in the Museum District | FREE – Closure of two exhibitions at the Main Street Crafts Museum; Later, longer, less: the work of Jennifer Ling Datchuk (ends Saturday, January 8) showcases the traditional blue and white porcelain sculptures and large-scale multimedia installations of the Chinese-American artist who seeks to critique the realities of women’s access and liberation; and Copy culture: fanzines created and shared (ends Saturday, January 8) spotlights zines and ephemera from Texas and beyond, exploring the community, history and practice of self-proclaimed “zinesters,” who use collage and repurposed content to deliver a wide range of styles and platforms.
  • Houston Photography Center in Montrose | FREE – The West Alabama studio and photography gallery close two exhibitions; Learning curve 14 (ends Sunday January 9), which showcases the work of over 30 artists from HCP’s various workshops and programs, fuses the unique voices and perspectives of students of all skill levels and photographic experiences; and the 2021 scholarship exhibition (ends Sunday, January 9) which features the work of Arkansas-based photographer Aaron Turner and Houston-based artist and filmmaker Yue Nakayama.
  • Asia Society Texas Center in the Museum District – the exhibition by Japanese artist Kana Harada, Divine spark (ends Sunday January 9), brings several new works produced during the global pandemic that blend messages of hope and positivity through an innovative approach to sculpture, installation and painting. $ 8; free for children 12 and under.
  • Blaffer Art Museum at the University of Houston | FREE – The work of Maryam Jafri is exhibited in A wide and narrow point (ends Sunday, January 9), which features multiple series that examine the relationships between identity, authenticity, and commerce, as well as the ways therapy has imbued with convenience and celebrity aesthetics.
  • Houston Museum of African American Culture in the Museum District | FREE – Born in Houston and based in New York, the works of Justin Sterling in Windows of opportunity (ends Saturday, January 15) illustrate how small habits of social neglect can have profound consequences for the community through the use of found objects that represent or symbolize social and environmental issues.
Anri Sala’s Work Joins Other Artists in “Soundwaves” at the Moody Center for the Arts | Courtesy of the Moody Center for the Arts
  • Lawndale Art Center in the Museum District | FREE – Three exhibitions are ending this month; David McGee’s work for The Sankofa project (ends Saturday January 15) in the windows facing Main Street examines the historical events that have led to our present moment of social unrest and racial reckoning; Emily Peacock: Dying of Laughter (ends Saturday January 15) uses the artist’s mark of humor and levity as a way to deal with tragedy in photography, video, sculpture, performance and installations; and Bria Lauren: gold was made for her (ends Saturday, January 15) is a photographic project by native Third Ward artist that celebrates the women of South Side Houston, amplifying their voices and the voices of black women across generations who have been affected by structural inequalities , generational narratives and political respectability.
  • Houston Museum of Fine Arts in the Museum District – The institution of fine arts closes three exhibitions in January; Georgia O’Keeffe, photographer (ends Monday, January 17) takes a fresh look at the southwestern artist by considering his approach to photography in the context of his long career; Afro-Atlantic stories (ends Monday, January 17) explores the history and legacy of the Transatlantic Slave Trade in more than 130 works of art that span five centuries and include contemporary artists like Glenn Ligon, Ibrahim Mahama and Kara Walker; and Calder-Picasso (ends Sunday, January 30), which examines the relationship and parallel developments of American artist Alexander Calder and Spanish artist Pablo Picasso (this exhibit costs $ 23; $ 18 for ages 13-18 and 65+ ; free for children 12 and under).
  • Buffalo Bayou Park Cistern – The third artistic project at the cistern, at Anri Sala The time is gone (ends Monday, January 17) creates an otherworldly environment to a painful and haunting saxophone soundtrack and surreal film footage aboard an abandoned space station. Viewings are available in 30 minute segments. $ 12 for ages 9 and over; $ 8 for students and people 62 and over; free on Thursdays.
  • Menil Collection in Montrose | FREE – Closed this month, Niki de Saint Phalle in the 1960s (ends Sunday, January 23) explores the pivotal 10-year period of the Franco-American artist’s career and presents numerous works from European collections that make their United States debut in this exhibition.
  • The printing museum in Montrose – The culmination of the museum’s new artist residency program, New directions: 2020-2021 Artists in residence (ends Sunday, January 30) showcases the work of seven artists who have each achieved varying artistic results across the disciplines of bookbinding, typography, printmaking and papermaking. $ 10; $ 5 for ages 6 to 18; free for children 5 and under.

Check out other installations and exhibits currently in the museums of Greater Houston.

Save on multi-day passes to museums around Houston

A detail from “Into Bondage” by Aaron Douglas | Courtesy of the Houston Museum of Fine Arts

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Longtime Houstonian Justin Jerkins oversees all manner of events in H-Town, including breweries, sports, concerts, must-see destinations and more while serving as the editor of 365 things to do in Houston.


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