History Museums – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 08:53:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://deepwood.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2-150x150.png History Museums – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ 32 32 In a new take on looted bronzes, Nigerian artists donate work to the British Museum https://deepwood.net/in-a-new-take-on-looted-bronzes-nigerian-artists-donate-work-to-the-british-museum/ https://deepwood.net/in-a-new-take-on-looted-bronzes-nigerian-artists-donate-work-to-the-british-museum/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 08:25:01 +0000 https://deepwood.net/in-a-new-take-on-looted-bronzes-nigerian-artists-donate-work-to-the-british-museum/ A sculpture of a military commander looted by British soldiers from the Kingdom of Benin in 1897 is on display in the “Where is Africa” ​​exhibition. (Photo by Thomas Niedermueller / Getty Images) In 1897, British troops looted Benin bronzes at the royal court of Benin, Nigeria. The Ahiamwen artists’ guild says it wants to […]]]>

A sculpture of a military commander looted by British soldiers from the Kingdom of Benin in 1897 is on display in the “Where is Africa” ​​exhibition. (Photo by Thomas Niedermueller / Getty Images)

  • In 1897, British troops looted Benin bronzes at the royal court of Benin, Nigeria.
  • The Ahiamwen artists’ guild says it wants to donate contemporary works to the British Museum, not tainted with looting.
  • The British Museum only stated that this was a matter of discussion between itself and the parties offering the objects.

A new artists’ guild from Benin City, Nigeria has offered to donate works of art to the British Museum in London to encourage them to return the priceless Benin bronzes that were looted from the city’s royal court. by British troops in 1897.

Created in the once powerful kingdom of Benin from at least the 16th century, bronze and brass sculptures are among Africa’s most beautiful and culturally significant artifacts. The European museums that house them have been criticized for years for their status as loot and symbols of colonial greed.

The Ahiamwen Bronze Artists and Founders Guild says it wants to change the terms of the debate by offering the British Museum contemporary works of art, devoid of any history of looting, which showcase the modern culture of Benin City.

“We never stopped making the bronzes even after they were stolen,” said Osarobo Zeickner-Okoro, founding member of the new guild and instigator of the proposed donation. “I think we’re making them even better now.”

“Part of the crime that was committed, it’s not just ok, they were looted, is the fact that you portrayed our civilization as a dead civilization, you put us in ancient Egypt or something. something like that, ”he said.

The works of art on display, unveiled in Benin City during a ceremony attended by a member of the royal court, include a bronze plaque measuring 2 by 2 meters with engravings depicting historical events in Benin, and a ram full size made entirely of spark plugs.

When asked to comment on the offer, the British Museum only said it was a matter of discussion between itself and the parties offering the items.

Zeickner-Okoro, who traveled from Benin City to London this month in part to advance his initiative, said he had an upcoming meeting with curators from the museum’s Africa department.

While Germany has said it wants to return Benin bronzes from its museums to Nigeria, the British Museum, which houses the largest and most important collection of objects, has not made a clear commitment.

It indicates on its website that its director, Hartwig Fischer, had an audience with the Oba, or king, of Benin in 2018 “which included a discussion of new opportunities for sharing and exhibiting objects from the Kingdom of Benin ”.

But many people in Benin City see no justification for European museums to cling to the loot.

“They have to bring it back. It is not their father’s property. The property belongs to the Oba of Benin,” said bronze chief founder Nosa Ogiakhia.

Zeickner-Okoro, who grew up partly in Britain before returning to Benin City, acknowledged that the presence of Benin Bronzes in European museums has enabled them to reach a global audience. But he said they should now go back to the place and the people who created them.

“The descendants of the people who cast these bronzes, they have never seen this work because most of them cannot afford to fly to London to come to the British Museum,” he said. he declares.

“They have these catalogs, PDF copies of the British Museum catalog, which they use to reference the work of their ancestors, and I think it’s so sad.”


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Talking About Ferrets | People https://deepwood.net/talking-about-ferrets-people/ https://deepwood.net/talking-about-ferrets-people/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 17:21:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/talking-about-ferrets-people/ Forty years ago, Shep encountered a black-footed ferret in his backyard with the Hoggs on the banks of the Greybull River. Thanks to this encounter and the curiosity of John and Lucille Hogg, the last remaining population of black-footed ferrets was found. You may be familiar with the story: Biologists came down to Meeteetse, Wyoming, […]]]>

Forty years ago, Shep encountered a black-footed ferret in his backyard with the Hoggs on the banks of the Greybull River. Thanks to this encounter and the curiosity of John and Lucille Hogg, the last remaining population of black-footed ferrets was found. You may be familiar with the story: Biologists came down to Meeteetse, Wyoming, and began to watch the ferrets.

The story of rediscovery and reintroduction made another breakthrough on December 10, 2020, when “Elizabeth Ann” became not only the first cloned black-footed ferret, but also the first endangered species to be cloned in the United States. United. This momentous opportunity will help bring genetic diversity to the ferret population, better equipping them to deal with things like woodland plague.

To celebrate this milestone, the Meeteetse Museums, the US Fish & Wildlife Service and the Draper Museum of Natural History at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West are working together to deliver a truly one-of-a-kind event.

The public is invited at 8:30 am Friday to hear from those at the forefront of cloning efforts: Ryan Phelan, Revive and Restore; Oliver Ryder, San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance; Shawn Walker, ViaGen; Angi Bruce, Wyoming Game and Fish; and Robyn Bortner, US Fish and Wildlife. Dr Lenox Baker from Meeteetse will act as moderator. The Draper Natural History Museum will host the virtual event and a recording of the panel will be uploaded after the event.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with information about attending the presentation. An in-person watch party will take place at the Meeteetse Library, where there will be a draw for a door prize for a ferret mug and shirt.


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An old tablet, stolen and then acquired by Hobby Lobby, will be returned to Iraq https://deepwood.net/an-old-tablet-stolen-and-then-acquired-by-hobby-lobby-will-be-returned-to-iraq/ https://deepwood.net/an-old-tablet-stolen-and-then-acquired-by-hobby-lobby-will-be-returned-to-iraq/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 23:38:34 +0000 https://deepwood.net/an-old-tablet-stolen-and-then-acquired-by-hobby-lobby-will-be-returned-to-iraq/ A 3,500-year-old clay tablet that was looted from an Iraqi museum 30 years ago has returned to Iraq. Known as the Gilgamesh Dream Tablet, it was acquired by the Hobby Lobby company in 2014 for display at the Museum of the Bible in Washington. DCUS authorities seized it in 2019, saying it had been stolen […]]]>

A 3,500-year-old clay tablet that was looted from an Iraqi museum 30 years ago has returned to Iraq.

Known as the Gilgamesh Dream Tablet, it was acquired by the Hobby Lobby company in 2014 for display at the Museum of the Bible in Washington. DCUS authorities seized it in 2019, saying it had been stolen and should be returned.

This comeback takes place Thursday at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian. He is one of a group of approximately 17,000 looted antiquities that the United States has agreed to return to Iraq. Some went back there in July.

“By returning these illegally acquired objects, the authorities here in the United States and in Iraq are allowing the Iraqi people to reconnect with a page in their history,” UNESCO Director-General Audrey Azoulay said in a statement.

The tablet measures 5 by 6 inches. It features inscriptions in Sumerian, the language of the ancient Mesopotamian civilization. The text includes a section from the epic of Gilgamesh, a poem said to have been written at least 4,000 years ago.

During the Gulf War in 1991, Saddam Hussein’s regime lost control of parts of Iraq and several regional museums were looted with historical artifacts, possibly including tablets.

In 2001, he went to a London antiques dealer, according to the US Department of Justice. Then it moved on to antique shops in the United States and then to London where, in 2014, auction house Christie’s sold it to Hobby Lobby for $ 1.67 million.

Hobby Lobby sued Christie’s, claiming the auction house provided false documents about the tablet’s history. Christie’s said she was unaware the documents were fake at the time.

The owners of Hobby Lobby are also the founders of the Bible Museum. The museum opened in 2017. Hobby Lobby president Steve Green began collecting artifacts in 2009 for the museum, but admits he knew little about the collection at first and didn’t know much about the collection. is not sufficiently assured that he did not buy stolen items.

In 2017, Hobby Lobby agreed to pay a fine of $ 3 million as part of a settlement with the Department of Justice and agreed to return thousands of illegally imported clay tablets.

Green announced in March 2020 that he would return 11,500 items to the Iraqi and Egyptian governments.

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5 things you didn’t know about Houston, learned at the 1940 terminal museum https://deepwood.net/5-things-you-didnt-know-about-houston-learned-at-the-1940-terminal-museum/ https://deepwood.net/5-things-you-didnt-know-about-houston-learned-at-the-1940-terminal-museum/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 11:03:52 +0000 https://deepwood.net/5-things-you-didnt-know-about-houston-learned-at-the-1940-terminal-museum/ It’s always been known as Space City, but do you know of Houston’s historic history of flying below 40,000 feet? Tucked away at the west end of Hobby Airport in southeast Houston is the 1940 Air Terminal Museum, a collection and narrative of Houston aviation history in the very rooms where it has begin. In […]]]>

It’s always been known as Space City, but do you know of Houston’s historic history of flying below 40,000 feet?

Tucked away at the west end of Hobby Airport in southeast Houston is the 1940 Air Terminal Museum, a collection and narrative of Houston aviation history in the very rooms where it has begin. In a rare gesture for the city that likes to demolish its vestiges of yesteryear, the building is now listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The designation helps preserve the building and allows the museum to benefit from certain tax exemptions, as well as open up more funding opportunities.

“Very few buildings of this type exist,” said George Haines, acting executive director, on a recent tour. “It was a very short lived design theme. Since many art deco structures were also transportation structures, as transportation needs changed they were either redeveloped or demolished.”

Passengers are checked in at counters in the lobby of the administration building at Houston Municipal Airport on October 26, 1941.

Column by Eddie Schisser / Houston

The terminal has been used by millions of Houstonians to get in and out of the city from its grand opening in 1940 until 1978, when the last tenants left. Now a museum for the Houston terminal and airline industry, it’s a blast from the past for anyone interested in learning more about the city and its sky.

I visited the museum to see what I could learn from its contents, the people and the building itself. These five things took me by surprise:

He survived two demolition plans

The terminal is a small building constructed by Joseph Finger, a renowned Austrian architect who also designed the similarly styled City Hall building in downtown Houston. The terminal was built in 1940, when approximately 18,000 people entered and left Houston each year. In 10 years, that number has climbed to over 500,000.

Entering the 1940 Terminal Museum is like stepping into the past.

Entering the 1940 Terminal Museum is like stepping into the past.

Steve gonzales

In the mid-1950s, city leaders saw the need for a larger terminal to handle the explosion in traffic. Their original plan was to demolish the old terminal, which was not even twenty years old, and build a bigger one in its place. Miraculously, the land was too small for a new building, which was eventually built north of the airstrips along Airport Boulevard.

Over the next two decades, airlines either moved to the new terminal or landed further north at Houston’s largest intercontinental airport. In 1978, the building was abandoned. It was at this point that airport manager James DeLong again attempted to demolish the building to make way for a new ramp for the airline, but airport employees and enthusiasts opposed the plan.

The original chandelier hung in the building even for the 20 years it was abandoned and empty.

The original chandelier hung in the building even for the 20 years it was abandoned and empty.

Elizabeth Conley / Staff

The terminal sat empty for a full two decades until the new Houston Aeronautical Heritage Society took control in 1998.

Sexism in the US military forced WASPs to use terminal toilets

An important footnote in Houston history is the short residence of the WASPs, or Women Airforce Service Pilots, at the start of the United States’ involvement in World War II.

The women’s squadron fought the ideological obstacles of the 1940s to become civilian pilots shuttle planes to and from bases across the country, among other tasks. For a few months, the women loaded new members into a hangar at the municipal airport – a hangar built for the military, not for the women.

Founder of the Women's Air Force Service Pilot, Margaret Callahan, checks her card before a flight from Avenger Field in Sweetwater, Texas, in August 1943. Wasps have already trained in Houston.

Founder of the Women’s Air Force Service Pilot, Margaret Callahan, checks her card before a flight from Avenger Field in Sweetwater, Texas, in August 1943. Wasps have already trained in Houston.

PhotoQuest / Getty Images

This meant there were no female facilities in the building, Haines said. Instead, they had to walk to the terminal building and use the public women’s washroom.

You can fly directly to see the museum

The 1940 Terminal Museum differs from those in the Museum Quarter in many ways.

He is far from the neighborhood, so he cannot take advantage of the pedestrian traffic of curious and wandering spirits. However, its lack of practicality on foot is compensated in another way: if you’re lucky enough to own a plane, you can fly directly inside and park outside the museum.

Mail and fuel enter a 21-passenger large Douglas for an overnight flight from Houston to New York on October 26, 1941.

Mail and fuel enter a 21-passenger large Douglas for an overnight flight from Houston to New York on October 26, 1941.

Column by Eddie Schisser / Houston

Haines boasts of being one of the only museums in existence to offer such functionality. It doesn’t happen every day, but it’s a thrill every time, he says.

The genitals on a frieze of the Roman god Mercury are covered with a plane

Who Said Modesty Has To Be Modest? San Angelo artist Dwight Holmes designed a series of friezes that are featured all around the exterior of the building to this day. The centerpiece as you enter the building is an engraving of the Roman god Mercury clutching a dove, for peace, and a torch, for knowledge. He is depicted in an aviator’s helmet and has outstretched wings.

Then there is the body covering her private parts. Holmes apparently predicted how Texans react to nude public art and covered the NSFW element with a plane.

The rest of the building’s engravings show a Wright brothers aircraft to represent the past, a crew loading luggage onto a modern aircraft to represent the present in 1940, and a futuristic-looking aircraft with the propellers of an airplane and the blades of a plane. ‘a helicopter.

They donate a plane every year

Only a small part of the annual budget is funded by ticket sales. Instead, the huge gaps are filled with donations and endowments, Haines said. But a big push for fundraising each year comes when they raffle a plane.

This is one of the many planes that the museum has raffled off over the years.

This is one of the many planes that the museum has raffled off over the years.

Jay R. Jordan / Chron staff

This 2021 award is a 1958 7FC Champion, whose bright yellow paint is reminiscent of the 1950s. The winner was announced at the museum’s quarterly Wings and Wheels event on Saturday, although his name has not been made public.



Whether you’re an aviation nerd, trying to learn more about the history of the city of Houston, or just want to discover a new place, there is much more to learn at the 1940 Air Terminal Museum.




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Step back in time with a visit to Granville, Tennessee https://deepwood.net/step-back-in-time-with-a-visit-to-granville-tennessee/ https://deepwood.net/step-back-in-time-with-a-visit-to-granville-tennessee/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 22:18:45 +0000 https://deepwood.net/step-back-in-time-with-a-visit-to-granville-tennessee/ Wandering the streets of Granville, Tennessee, it’s hard not to imagine Sheriff Andy Taylor – played by Andy Griffith – and his deputy, Barney Fife – played by Don Knotts – strolling down the street and facing a scheme. after another. Heide brandes When you walk along Granville Main Street, located 1 hour and 15 […]]]>

Wandering the streets of Granville, Tennessee, it’s hard not to imagine Sheriff Andy Taylor – played by Andy Griffith – and his deputy, Barney Fife – played by Don Knotts – strolling down the street and facing a scheme. after another.

Heide brandes

When you walk along Granville Main Street, located 1 hour and 15 minutes east of Nashville on the banks of the Cumberland River, you are stepping back in time. You could very well be in your own episode of The Andy Griffith Show, and that’s exactly how the people of Granville, Tennessee want you to feel.

Known as Tennessee’s “Mayberry Town”, the historic town of Granville is a quaint little town filled with period general stores, Americana museums, and a slow, calm pace that invites visitors to “rest” . I was able to visit this lovely area on a Tennessee tour and Granville was one of my favorite stops.

Managed by around 200 volunteers, this quaint Tennessee community is a true ‘Mayberry’, based on the iconic Andy Griffith Show 1960s. Although the show is based on the actor’s hometown of Mount Airy, North Carolina, the historic Granville adopted the nickname “Tennessee’s Mayberry” as a tribute to all of the city ​​at the show.

From the historic TB Sutton general store to the community theater play that recreates episodes of The Andy Griffith Show for visitors to the Mayberry – I Love Lucy Museum, a day in historic Granville is truly a step back in time, when neighbors all knew each other and chatted while lounging on the covered porches.

Here’s how you can step back in time by visiting the historic town of Granville in Mayberry, Tennessee.

Where is Granville?

Located in the Upper Cumberland area of ​​Tennessee, this small, old-fashioned town of 300 residents is located 1 hour and 15 minutes from Nashville on Lake Cordell Hull. With a recent $ 2.5 million expansion, a new lodge at the Wildwood Resort & Marina on the Cumberland River, and the development of three bed and breakfasts in Granville, the small community is becoming increasingly popular. The ride from Nashville will take you along Interstate 40 to Gordonsville, where you will take State Highway 264 to Elmwood, then Highway 53 from Elmwood to Granville.

Stay in one of the Airstreams located on the property of the Wildwood Resort & Marina.
Vintage Airstream (Photo credit: Heide Brandes)

Pro tip: The Wildwood Resort & Marina is a charming place to feel at home while visiting Granville. It is located just 11 miles from Interstate 40 and offers lakeside accommodations, cabins, vintage Airstreams, cottages and the Lakeside Inn. The on-site restaurant offers high-quality dining and killer steaks, along with delicious cocktails and a terrace with some of the best sunset views. You can also book a pontoon excursion for a sunset lake cruise, breakfast cruise, or weekend champagne brunch cruise.

"Gainville, a town of Mayberry," button with cop car in the center.
Heide brandes

Granville history

Granville was a thriving river town from the mid-1800s until 1920. With the end of river boat trips, Granville turned to agriculture and was a thriving farming town, until the Cordell Hull Dam. was built in the early 1970s.

The new lake covered farmland and Granville was doomed to disappear and become another ghost town.

“This city was here before Tennessee was the state,” said Liz Huff Bennett, Granville volunteer and tour guide. “Our ancestors came from Granville County, North Carolina, and settled here. We were a city of steamboats. When the Cordell Dam went into effect, we became a ghost town.

The pride of the small village is not dead, however, and in 1997 a group of citizens wanted to restore the historic First Methodist Church in Granville, which was celebrating its 100th anniversary.

“From there different things started to happen and we started to restore one thing at a time,” Bennett said. “We started in 1999. The second year we opened the TB Sutton general store with two supplies – we were to have a bluegrass dinner show and we were to open it Wednesday through Saturday. We opened on April 5, 2008, and every show is broadcast on radio in every state in the United States. People started coming here saying, “Well, I feel like I’m in Mayberry.” And so from there, we created a Mayberry city.

As Granville has recreated itself to restore period buildings and become a destination, Randall Clemons and other volunteers have created a host of festivals and events to give visitors a taste of the life of a simpler era.

Ceramic clown and circus elephant on display.
Heide brandes

Things to do in Granville

You will need a full day to explore all that this small, unincorporated town has to offer. Your first stop should be the Granville Museum, which highlights the history and life of this small farming community. Exhibits include the photographic collection of Vincent B. “Moe” DeNardo – a soldier in Granville during World War II – and photographs and artefacts that tell the story of Granville over the years.

You can’t visit Granville without stopping by the TB Sutton General Store, a two-story 1865 monument with four boutiques and a restaurant serving southern comfort food and hoe cakes.

On Saturday nights, the TB Sutton store also hosts the Sutton Ole Time Music Hour, a bluegrass dinner show similar to the Grand Ole Opry – even with live commercials – which airs across the country.

The Mayberry-I Love Lucy Museum with an I love Lucy ceramic cookie jar and coffee mugs.
Heide brandes

History and pop culture come to life in Granville’s many museums, including the Mayberry – I Love Lucy Museum, which features collections of two of America’s most beloved television shows. You can walk around Floyd’s hair salon, “meet” Aunt Bee, Opie and other characters, and relive the crazy antics of Lucy and Ricky Ricardo.

The Sutton Homeplace & Pioneer Village is a 19th century house that has been restored with authentic furnishings depicting the daily life of the area’s first settlers. The new Farm to Table Museum, which opened in 2020, sheds light on the history of historic Middle Tennessee farms.

Cold weather truck full of fruit and vegetable display for sale in the back of the truck.
Heide brandes

For whiskey lovers, the 2,600 Jim Beam whiskey-filled decanters can be seen at the Granville Whiskey Decanter Museum, and the Granville Car Museum has an impressive collection of vintage cars and old-fashioned automobiles.

Also be sure to explore Sutton Farm and Pioneer Village, or take a guided tour of historic Granville with one of the many volunteers and historians. All sites are open Wednesday through Saturday.

“Granville is truly a step back in time,” Bennett said. “Mayberry is a concept and an idea. Everyone has said that Granville is like an actual Mayberry, so that’s what we have become.

Pro tip: There isn’t a bad time to visit Mayberry Town, Tennessee. Events and festivals take place year round, and in the spring, the Sutton Store Players present iconic episodes of The Andy Griffith Show with an outdoor dinner show.

If you’re planning on heading to Nashville after your trip to Granville, check out these articles:


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Israel Museum’s photo exhibit takes a trip across the Mediterranean https://deepwood.net/israel-museums-photo-exhibit-takes-a-trip-across-the-mediterranean/ https://deepwood.net/israel-museums-photo-exhibit-takes-a-trip-across-the-mediterranean/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 13:25:29 +0000 https://deepwood.net/israel-museums-photo-exhibit-takes-a-trip-across-the-mediterranean/ Muza – Eretz Israel Museum in Tel Aviv, one of Israel’s three largest and most prominent museums, presents the first-ever Photomenta, a large-scale photographic exhibition featuring more than 300 works by 35 photographers from 16 countries and Mediterranean territories. The exhibition is slated to open on Tuesday, September 21, and will run for a year […]]]>

Muza – Eretz Israel Museum in Tel Aviv, one of Israel’s three largest and most prominent museums, presents the first-ever Photomenta, a large-scale photographic exhibition featuring more than 300 works by 35 photographers from 16 countries and Mediterranean territories. The exhibition is slated to open on Tuesday, September 21, and will run for a year as part of the museum’s 2021-2022 international season.

The exhibition serves as a “bridge that spans abroad and people, across borders and political conflicts,” a museum statement said, the photographs providing “a mental, artistic and narrative meeting point with the people.” others “in our neighborhood”.

This photo of Nadir Bucan from Turkey is part of his “Under the shadow of the sun” series and will be part of the Photomenta exhibition. Courtesy.

The exhibition features photographers from countries such as Turkey, Greece, Cyprus, Albania, Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Slovenia, Italy, France, Spain, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Malta, Israel and the Palestinian Authority. The works are centered on the idea of ​​rhythm, a theme that refers to the meter and rhythm in music, poetry and movement.

“The choice of this theme frames each series of photographs, and the exhibition as a whole, like a form of visual poetry, which has its own rhythm. This selection of works raises the question of whether photographers from the Mediterranean basin share a unique photographic rhythm, ”Guy Raz, chief curator of photography at Muza, told NoCamels.

A photograph by Malta-based visual artist and experimental photographer Ritty Tacsum. Courtesy.

The term Photomenta, according to Raz, refers to a series of associations: photography, cartography, monuments, documentation, moments, mythology and the Mediterranean. “These are the underlying elements of a photographic language emerging between three continents – Europe, Asia and Africa,” said Raz, “Photomenta’s roots are thus nourished by mythological encounters in the cradle of the civilization. The Mediterranean basin, which once served as a crossroads, continues today to form a cultural bridge between East and West.

A photo by Italian photographer Luca Locatelli at Studi d’Arte, an installation for training young sculptors, will appear at the Photomenta exhibition in Tel Aviv. Courtesy

According to Raz, the Photomenta exhibition will take place every five years “to allow precise choice of subject and in-depth research”. It will also leave “enough space” for the next Photomenta, he says.

Raz tells NoCamels that he came up with the idea for Photomenta “many years ago” as a photo exhibition to connect photographers from Mediterranean countries. “The basic idea was to present at least one photographer from each of the 21 Mediterranean countries,” he explains.

photomenta
A photo of a couple by photographer Ana Galan from Spain. Courtesy.

When he was appointed curator of photography at the Eretz Israel Museum, he proposed the idea to the museum management and they decided it was a worthwhile project.

“Subsequently, I made a commitment to showcase the highest quality photography from each country in order to maintain exposure of the highest photographic and artistic quality,” he adds.

The effort to find photographers from countries across the Mediterranean has been a painstaking process, according to Raz. This included conversations with colleagues, locating, photographers via websites, viewing past exhibitions online, and making contact with photographers via email and Zoom until agreements could be signed and digital files on loan for production in Israel.

Sheep are fed outdoors twice a day in winter in Turkey, February 2017. Photo by Nadir Bucan. Courtesy: Photomenta

Fifteen of the 35 artists whose works are on display are Israeli photographers. They include photographs of Oded Balilty, the first and only Israeli photographer to receive the Pulitzer Prize for his photograph of a lone Jewish settler, confronting Israeli security agents during the evacuation of an outpost in the West Bank colony. There is also the work of Noa Ben-Nun Melamed, a photographer known for her austere black and white photographs of objects and landscapes.

Photo by Noa Ben-Nun Melamed. Courtesy: Photomenta

The exhibition will also feature works by Dor Guez, an Israeli artist of Palestinian Christian and Tunisian Jewish descent and founder of the Palestinian Christian Archives. He is known for his “Lilies of The Field” series of photographs that examine, mimic and sometimes reproduce albums of dried flowers that were popular keepsakes for tourists and pilgrims traveling from Europe and America to the Holy Land. at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th. centuries. These were based on a study of photographs depicting these flower albums found in the archives of the American Colony in Jerusalem. The American Colony was established in Jerusalem in 1881 by members of a utopian Christian society led by Anna and Horatio Spafford.

“Acrobatics” series. Photo by Hicham Benohoud. Courtesy: Photomenta

Other photographers outside of Israel include the Moroccan Hicham Benohoud, a photographer who presents his staged and colorful series “Acrobatics” where he features Moroccan families in unconventional and humorous compositions in their own living room.

Photo by Marie Hudelot. “Heritage” series. 2013. Courtesy of: Photomenta

There is also the work of the Italian Laetizia Battaglia, photographer of everyday life and the Mafia in Sicily in the 70s and 80s. Her black and white documentary photography is presented for the first time in Israel. Franco-Algerian photographer Marie Huledot deals with visual family symbols of the political and aesthetic history of the tension between Africa and Europe.

Last but not least, Raed Bawayah of the Palestinian Authority presents a collection of black and white photographs of a Palestinian village where he was born and also of Europe, where he currently resides.

Raz tells NoCamels that he wants people to remember that “photography is a language of our generation, but it is also part of the history of art.”

“Visitors to the exhibition are invited to wear a metaphorical shell in their ears, to embark on a journey among its ports in a sort of odyssey, and to listen to the rhythm of Photomenta,” he adds.

The exhibit will be open to the public on the first full day of the Sukkot feast, Tuesday, September 21. The exhibition will be accompanied by special events, guided tours, lectures, Mediterranean music performances and more from 10 a.m. Entrance to the museum is free.


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6 ways Alabama truly is the state of surprises https://deepwood.net/6-ways-alabama-truly-is-the-state-of-surprises/ https://deepwood.net/6-ways-alabama-truly-is-the-state-of-surprises/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 15:15:41 +0000 https://deepwood.net/6-ways-alabama-truly-is-the-state-of-surprises/ All states have a one-line nickname that succinctly describes what it is. All of these slogans are designed to attract tourists. Slogans such as “I Love New York” and “Virginia is for Lovers” are examples that have remained etched in our collective consciousness. In 1988, Alabama decided it was time to change the mindset of […]]]>

All states have a one-line nickname that succinctly describes what it is. All of these slogans are designed to attract tourists. Slogans such as “I Love New York” and “Virginia is for Lovers” are examples that have remained etched in our collective consciousness.

In 1988, Alabama decided it was time to change the mindset of Americans and try to erase the stereotypes that had been imposed on it. The marketing brains of the Alabama Department of Tourism have launched a new campaign to attract tourism dollars. Travel guides have been published. State border welcome signs have been updated. Radio and television commercials have hit airwaves across the country, all proudly proclaiming Alabama as “the state of surprises.”

The nickname was a surprise not only to travelers, but also to residents, who had no idea what they had in their own backyards, and there are plenty of them: shiny white gulf beaches, mountains. hilly and rocky hills, incredible outdoor sports and recreation, arts, and entertainment, touching southern cuisine, unusual attractions off the beaten track. The list is lengthened increasingly.

Here are six reasons Alabama lives up to its moniker and why it should be considered for your next getaway.

An alligator along the banks of the Mobile-Tensaw River Delta (Photo credit: Joe Cuhaj)

1. Nature abounds

Researchers at the University of Georgia have called Alabama the “Fort Knox of Biodiversity.” Its hot and humid climate combined with a myriad of rivers, streams, streams, wetlands and river delta make it one of the most biodiverse regions of the country with an incredible and abundant range of wildflowers, of trees and an amazing list of aquatic and aquatic plants. terrestrial fauna.

Then there are the impressive landscapes. The northern region around Huntsville is a geological wonderland. Destinations like Dismals Canyon, Cane Creek Nature Preserve and the ‘Land of a Thousand Waterfalls’ – Bankhead National Forest and Sipsey Wilderness – feature deep and mysterious canyons painted with thick green moss inviting you to explore ancient crevasses and rock shelters that Native Americans once called home and where towering waterfalls continue to cut soft rock.

To the northeast, mighty waterfalls, including DeSoto Falls and Little River Falls, flow into deep gorges.

As you head to the central region near Birmingham, you can experience breathtaking panoramic views of the rolling Southern Appalachians from the many rocky cliffs of the Talladega National Forest, hike the mixed deciduous forests on along State Road – the 171 mile long Pinhoti Trail, and take a dip to cool off from the hot southern summer sun at Chinnabee Creek.

And along the Gulf Coast, the infiltrating bogs of pine forests create what is described as the most visually stunning collection of pitcher plants in the world at Splinter Hill Bog.

Joe Cuhaj canoeing on one of Alabama's many rivers.
Joe canoeing on one of Alabama’s many rivers (Photo credit: Joe Cuhaj)

2. Outdoor recreation

With all of this natural beauty, you would expect there to be some great outdoor recreation, and you would be right.

With over 132,000 miles of rivers, streams, lakes and coastline, Alabama is a paddler’s dream come true. Grab your kayak and try your hand at a whitewater adventure on Locust Fork or Flint Creek.

Take one of the state’s slow-moving blackwater rivers for a lazy float, one of the best being the Perdido River Canoe Trail which borders Alabama and Florida. The trail offers a cool swim and picnics on shiny white sand bars and the option to stay overnight in one of the elevated shelters on the trail.

For a real adventure, paddle one of the many dark and mysterious bayous of the Mobile-Tensaw River Delta on the Bartram Canoe Trail. The delta is the second largest in the country and resembles a tropical forest hence its nickname “America’s Amazon”. It’s best to explore this aquatic wilderness with a local guide like those at Wild Native.

For cyclists, Alabama has world-class single-track mountain bike trails, many of which are located in state parks, including Chewacla and Oak Mountain. The best can be found at Coldwater Mountain, where 35 miles of trail challenge beginners to avid cyclists.

And for you fishermen, you have come to the right place. There are over 132,000 miles of rivers and streams as well as shoreline on the Gulf of Mexico, giving you the option of casting your line for Largemouth Bass on Lake Martin, King Mackerel or Red Snapper. off the 1,540-foot-long Gulf State Park Fishing and Education Pier, or board a charter boat to disembark the sailboat.

A moment of solitude on the beaches of the Gulf of Alabama.
A moment of solitude on the beaches of the Gulf of Alabama (Photo credit: Joe Cuhaj)

3. Go to the beach

Alabama’s footprint along the Gulf Coast is relatively small compared to its neighbors, but it still has some of the best, sugary white sand beaches in the Gulf. The snow-capped white dunes and the gently sloping shore are brought to life by the bewitching turquoise waters of the gulf that demarcate the shore. While these beaches are increasingly well known, the area still has a quaint and inviting charm that makes it the perfect vacation destination.

You would be hard pressed to find better hosts than the towns of Orange Beach and Gulf Shores which serve Southern hospitality and assured fun in the sun. After spending time soaking up the sun and surfing, hop aboard a dolphin cruise and watch the playful mammals frolic in the wake. For the daredevil in you, cool off with a thrilling descent on one of Waterville USA’s giant water slides, or buckle up and hold on for a thrilling ride on the Rollin ‘Thunder at OWA Amusement Park .

One of Alabama's entertainment venues: the Saenger Theater in Mobile.
One of Alabama’s entertainment venues: The Saenger Theater in Mobile (Photo credit: Joe Cuhaj)

4. Arts and entertainment

World-class concert halls, theaters and events can be found across the state from Huntsville to Mobile. Highlights include cool jazz at Perfect Note in Hoover, a true mix of genres at Stove House in Huntsville, and the eclectic range of artists and musical styles found at Soul Kitchen in Mobile.

One of the country’s largest music festivals, the Hangout, is based in Gulf Shores. Every year, music lovers party the night away on the beach with food and fun, with several stages showcasing an incredible variety of national and local musicians.

The state’s four major cities – Huntsville, Birmingham, Montgomery and Mobile – have excellent symphony orchestras that delight music lovers with interpretations of arrangements by Bach, Mozart, Beethoven and even John Williams.

Before the last note is just a memory, be sure to visit the Alabama Music Hall of Fame in Tuscumbia where you’ll learn about the state’s rich musical history, including legends like Nat King Cole, Hank Williams and the Alabama group. , to only cite a few.

Resembling the bow of a ship, the GulfQuest Maritime Museum in Mobile, Alabama.
The GulfQuest Maritime Museum, which looks like the bow of a ship, in Mobile (Photo credit: Joe Cuhaj)

5. Fascinating museums

And we can’t forget the state’s world-class museums. Learn about the past, present, and future of spaceflight at the US Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, and learn about the sadness and horrors of slavery in America at the incredibly powerful Legacy Museum in Montgomery.

In Mobile, the GulfQuest Maritime Museum presents the history of the state’s oldest city and its role in the maritime history of the Gulf Coast. The museum offers dozens of interactive exhibits, including one where you can pilot a tanker to the port.

Mobile is known as the birthplace of Mardi Gras in America. The story of celebration and pageantry comes to life at the Mobile Carnival Museum. Many do not call Mobile the “Mother of Mystics” for nothing.

6. The comfort of the south … as in comfort food

Each state has its own exceptional barbecue – Kansas City, St. Louis, Memphis. But let me tell you, this is no barbecue in Alabama.

You haven’t lived until you dive into a delicious three-bone rib sandwich at Campbell’s in Talladega, sample the tangy walnut-smoked pork ribs at the famous Dreamland BBQ with locations in Northport, Montgomery, Tuscaloosa , Huntsville and Mobile, or revel in the smoker’s smoke upon entering the Bob Sykes Bar-BQ in Bessemer.

The state is also known for its incredible seafood served fresh from the boats that cruise the waves of the Gulf. Some of the best seafood restaurants are located on the causeway (US Highway 98 / US Highway 90) that connects Mobile and Baldwin counties on Mobile Bay. Locals will tell you the best can be found here at the three great seafood restaurants: The Original Oyster House, Bluegill Restaurant, and Ed’s Seafood Shed. Each serves their own variation of delicious fried oysters, flambés and half-shells and dozens of mouth-watering fish and crab dishes, all caught in the bay and gulf. And there’s an added bonus – a spectacular sunset light show over Mobile Bay.

The bottom line

So, as you can see, Alabama is truly a state of surprises. Whatever your pleasure, it offers many exciting vacation options. Visit the Alabama Department of Tourism website for more great adventures.

Learn more about what Alabama has to offer here:


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Lake County History Center hosts mid-American organ gathering – News-Herald https://deepwood.net/lake-county-history-center-hosts-mid-american-organ-gathering-news-herald/ https://deepwood.net/lake-county-history-center-hosts-mid-american-organ-gathering-news-herald/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 02:27:21 +0000 https://deepwood.net/lake-county-history-center-hosts-mid-american-organ-gathering-news-herald/ Interesting music filled the air for a four-hour period on the afternoon of September 18 at the Lake County History Center in Painesville Township. An organ rally was held at the organization’s grounds, which is located at 415 Riverside Drive in Painesville Township. The Mid-America Chapter of the Musical Box Society International hosted the event. […]]]>

Interesting music filled the air for a four-hour period on the afternoon of September 18 at the Lake County History Center in Painesville Township.

An organ rally was held at the organization’s grounds, which is located at 415 Riverside Drive in Painesville Township.

The Mid-America Chapter of the Musical Box Society International hosted the event. Chapter president Rob Pollock said the group had a connection to the Lake County History Center dating back to the 1970s.

In fact, the Lake County History Center is one of the few museums in America to feature some of MBSI’s music boxes.

“(Lake County History Center) was the oldest service location where we displayed our museum items,” Pollock said. “And we’ve had people here trained to play them. So not only can you watch them, but you can also hear them.

Dawson Bogert, of Corry, Pa., Poses with a “monkey organ” belonging to his mother, Alice Bogert, who is seated right in the background. At the top of the organ is a monkey named Bardell. When spelled, Bardell is made up of the first initials of the names of Alice’s seven children. This organ was one of many on display at a September 18 organ gathering held at the Lake County History Center in Painesville Township. (Bill DeBus – The News-Herald)

About 10 years ago, the Mid-America Chapter of MBSI hosted a rally at the Lake County History Center that featured full-size organs.

“This time around, we’ve brought in the handiest and the smallest,” Pollock said. “With older children, most of our owners are older and they usually have the help of their grandchildren. But once school sets in, we don’t go out (the great organs) that often.

The underside of a hand organ built in 1900 and now owned by Rob Pollock of Urbana, Ohio, shows the handwriting listing the five songs that will be played on the street by the organist. It was one of the organs and music boxes on display at a September 18 orchestral organ gathering at the Lake County History Center in Painesville Township. (Bill DeBus – The News-Herald)

For the September 18 rally, Pollock said nine members of MBSI’s Mid-America Chapter were to bring 16 different types of group organs or various other music boxes to the Lake County History Center.

Pollock, who lives in Urbana, Ohio, brought two bodies to the event. One was a 1900 hand organ that is supported by a strap around the player’s neck.

“(The organ) was made by the Austro-Hungarian army to give it to their invalids so that they could earn money on the streets,” Pollock said. “At the time, they did not pay pensions, so these organs were often rented by soldiers or invalids who took them to the streets and played music. Some people paid them for the music and others paid them to go away.

The underside of the organ’s top cover also includes a handwritten panel listing a program of five songs the organist would play for passers-by.

Meanwhile, the marching band organs have proven to be a source of family fun for Alice Bogert and her children.

Alice, from Corry, Pa., Owns a “monkey organ” built in 1990. At the top of the organ is a toy monkey that was also made about six years later.

The monkey’s name is “Bardell,” which when spelled is made up of the first initials of the names of his seven children.

His son, Dawson, also attended the rally and demonstrated how the organ works.

The Musical Box Society International, which was established in 1950, is “a group of global enthusiasts for automated music machines whose origins predate electrically amplified music,” according to the organization’s website.

“We are intrigued by musical instruments that play themselves using punched paper, punched discs, pinned cylinders, paper rolls or a digital musical instrument interface (MIDI) and are powered by a hand crank, springs or electric motors, ”the website said.

MBSI’s Mid-America Chapter covers a territory that includes states such as Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. and Kentucky.

Pollock said the organization provides a great opportunity for members to share a common passion, as well as to socialize.

“Once you get started on this project, you meet people who have similar interests and tastes, and after less than two or three years, it’s like getting together as a family,” he said. declared. “Everything is friendly.


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International students visit historic sites linked to the invasion of Japan https://deepwood.net/international-students-visit-historic-sites-linked-to-the-invasion-of-japan/ https://deepwood.net/international-students-visit-historic-sites-linked-to-the-invasion-of-japan/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 01:22:31 +0000 https://deepwood.net/international-students-visit-historic-sites-linked-to-the-invasion-of-japan/ By ZHANG YANGFEI in Beijing and WU YONG in Shenyang | China Daily | Updated: 2021-09-18 08:57 A group of international students visited nine historic sites in Shenyang, northeast China’s Liaoning Province, to commemorate the September 18 incident that marked Japan’s invasion of China. The trip was organized by the Liaoning Provincial Education Bureau and […]]]>

By ZHANG YANGFEI in Beijing and WU YONG in Shenyang | China Daily | Updated: 2021-09-18 08:57

A group of international students visited nine historic sites in Shenyang, northeast China’s Liaoning Province, to commemorate the September 18 incident that marked Japan’s invasion of China.

The trip was organized by the Liaoning Provincial Education Bureau and the Liaoning Educational Association for International Exchange.

Students from nine countries including Russia, Thailand and Pakistan visited sites including the former Beidaying Barracks site where Chinese and Japanese troops first clashed, the Incident History Museum of September 18, the former site of a prisoner of war camp and the exhibition hall of the former site of the Shenyang Military Court for the trial of Japanese war criminals.

This year marks the 90th anniversary of the September 18 incident. On September 18, 1931, the Japanese Kwantung Army launched a sudden attack on Shenyang, followed by the total occupation of northeastern China by Japan.

The incident also marked the start of the Chinese people’s war of resistance against Japanese aggression (1931-1945), the prelude to World War II.

Pakistani student Amjad Nawaz of Liaoning University praised China’s efforts to commemorate the incident, saying “a nation that does not know its history is like a tree without roots.”


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Digitized historical figures of Makoanyane: New Frame https://deepwood.net/digitized-historical-figures-of-makoanyane-new-frame/ https://deepwood.net/digitized-historical-figures-of-makoanyane-new-frame/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 11:15:13 +0000 https://deepwood.net/digitized-historical-figures-of-makoanyane-new-frame/ Ceramic artist Samuele Makoanyane, who lived and worked in the village of Koalabata in the Teyateyaneng district not far from Maseru, showed a profound gift for capturing intricate reproductions of people he encountered in everyday life. . His advisor, agent and confidant CG Damant sold Makoanyane’s work in the Frasers Trading store in Maseru and […]]]>

Ceramic artist Samuele Makoanyane, who lived and worked in the village of Koalabata in the Teyateyaneng district not far from Maseru, showed a profound gift for capturing intricate reproductions of people he encountered in everyday life. . His advisor, agent and confidant CG Damant sold Makoanyane’s work in the Frasers Trading store in Maseru and shipped it to different parts of South Africa, then Rhodesia, and some places overseas. Throughout their partnership, Damant advised Makoanyane to create models of his own people rather than missionaries, and to keep his figures small so that they are easier to carry.

In 1935, Makoanyane’s work was exhibited in Paris and New York, according to Esther Esmyol, curator of Iziko’s social history collections. The same year, Percival Kirby, then professor of music at the University of the Witwatersrand, commissioned Makoanyane to produce eight figurines of traditional musicians. Makoanyane made seven. It is assumed that he was unable to produce the eighth piece because the instrument involved was played in the male lebollo initiation ceremony, which is shrouded in secrecy. The exhibit then noted: “Makoanyane thought it was beyond him to attempt the eighth, the lekhitlane player that was traditionally used in the lebollo ceremony. The reason why this figure was not completed remains unanswered.

Unlike other pieces produced by Makoanyane, the Kirby Collection, now housed at the College of Music at the University of Cape Town (UCT), is unique. In 1936, Makoanyane’s work was exhibited at the Empire exhibition in Johannesburg. Today his work can be found in private collections and museums in South Africa and around the world.

August 27, 2021: The musicians shows Basotho men and women playing various traditional instruments. These figurines are part of the Kirby collection from the University of Cape Town.

A booklet on Makoanyane written by Damant is a crucial source of information on the artist’s life and work. As Steven Sack, curator of Iziko’s Makoanyane exhibition, notes: “This is the only account of the life of this neglected South African pioneer of figurative portraiture in the 1930s.” The booklet shows how the great attention of Makoanyane to the details of human life and his lonely lifestyle made him a stranger. Yet he was in awe of his skill and intelligence and, at the same time, feared by people who thought his powers of observation were unnatural and sinister.

“We struggled with the title of the show,” Sack said. “I didn’t mean to call it something like An unknown artist from Lesotho. Makoanyane ended his letters to Damant with the words: Ke liha pene, which means: “I put my pen down”.

“Once he constructed a figure, he would take a very thin pen-like instrument, known as a ‘scribe’ and write patterns and lines on it that ultimately really animated the work. It was almost as if he was writing the work in animated existence with this very fine drawing mode; engraving on the figurine. In a sense, when he finished making the sculpture and put down the scribing tool, it was like the act of writing and putting down his quill. So we decided to call the exhibition: Ke liha pene, I put my pen down.

A change in critical approach

Initial plans for the exhibition were thwarted when Covid-19 struck. “Originally, the exhibition was supposed to be a physical exhibit of the 11 pieces from the Iziko collection, which was held at the South African Museum, and it was to open last year in September.

“But, of course, the physical exhibit had to be canceled,” Sack said.

It turns out that the reconceptualized exhibition achieved what would not have been possible otherwise.

“Covid has produced wonderful innovations,” said Sack.

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  • Thania Petersen’s multimedia taxi project

The delay also allowed for critical reflection. “If the exhibit had taken place at the South African Museum, it would have perpetuated the same old problem of placing black culture in the context of a natural history museum,” said Sack, who has been aiming for a Makoanyane exhibit since its premiere. discovered the ceramic artist’s work in 1988, while he was preparing the first exhibition of South African black art at the Johannesburg Art Gallery – The neglected tradition: towards a new history of South African art (1930-1988).

“For me, it was important to take Makoanyane out of social history and ethnography into art,” Sack said.

For the exhibit, Sack worked with Jon Weinberg, whose company, DIJONDESIGN, is developing exhibits for the Lesotho National Museum and Gallery, which is still under construction.

“The fundamental seed of this project was a meeting in South Africa between officials from Lesotho and officials from Iziko,” Weinberg said. Initially Iziko, in collaboration with DIJONDESIGN, had planned to offer training to restorers to work in the museum. “We were about to start when Covid hit. We had to realign the relationship between Iziko and the National Museum of Lesotho, and it made sense to do so in a virtual exhibition shared on both sides of the border… ”

Photogrammetry

The exhibition uses photogrammetry to make Makoanyane figurines accessible to a virtual audience. “It’s the perfect medium for those very small, very fragile sculptures that you will inevitably only be able to see behind glass,” Sack said.

Stephen Wessels, who works extensively with Weinberg, has joined the team. Wessels studied geomatics at UCT and worked for the Zamani Project, where he participated in recording heritage sites across Africa and the Middle East in 3D using laser scanning and photogrammetry.

“Steven Sack came up with the idea to create a virtual exhibit and I was led to create the 3D models of the sculptures,” said Wessels.

August 27, 2021: the figurine of Samuele Makoanyane warrior represents Joshua Nau Makoanyane, his great-grandfather and a military commander of the army of King Moshoeshoe I.

The photogrammetric method used to create 3D replicas involves placing an object on an automated turntable and photographing it at 10 degree intervals from different perspectives for a full 360 degree rotation until it is captured. from all angles. The photographs are then processed by specific photogrammetry software which aligns all the photographs and reconstructs the model based on the information extracted from the photographs.

“It was done in one day and it was a safe method,” said Esmyol. “It’s really absolutely amazing. I don’t think you can get that detail in a physical exhibit.

“Everyone was very excited and it sparked a lot of discussion about other potential exhibits,” said Wessels.

August 27, 2021: Mother with baby, Samuele Makoanyane figurine representing a woman feeding a baby.

Combine form and sound

With the inclusion of the Kirby Collection, UCT College of Music became a partner in the project. Associate Professors of Ethnomusicology and African Music Sylvia Bruinders and Dizu Plaatjies visited the Morija Museum and Archives to meet people from Lesotho who still play instruments. These musicians have recorded, and the sounds will be used for the exhibition. Filmmaker Paul Weinberg filmed the musicians for the college and the National Museum of Lesotho.

“We went there and worked with the musicians who play these little-known instruments; in fact, most are quite rare, ”Bruinders said.

“One is a very, very soft instrument called the Lekope that plays a basic rhythm and has a very little melody; few notes and very small intervals. He was played by an old woman [Matlali Khoane].

“The other instrument is a more iconic basotho instrument called the Lesiba. The construction of the instrument is unusual: it has a string running through the end of a stick, which you pluck, and a feather is attached to which you breathe out, and it vibrates the string. It has the most peculiar sound; it looks like big birds. It was the instrument that was played by cattle ranchers. The Lesiba is a male instrument while the Lekope is a female instrument.

Associated article:

  • Remember Tsepo Tshola, the musical giant of Lesotho

The director and deputy curator of the Morija Museum, Pusetso Nyabela, organized the musicians. “Pusetso was instrumental in delivering multi-layered content for the Makoanyane Project and our other work,” Weinberg said. “Morija is a crucial cog in the process of developing a museum sector in Lesotho.”

“I managed to locate all the instruments,” Nyabela said. “The most famous instruments in the exhibition are the Lesiba and the Lekope. Older instruments have been around since time immemorial; they were inherited from the San. Others are fairly new instruments that were co-opted, perhaps in the 1930s, ”Nyabela said.

Lekope has traditionally been played for personal growth. “Transport services arrived quite late in Lesotho and the women were playing instruments as they walked,” Nyabela said.

Lesiba is also played for personal consolation, according to Leabua Mokhele, who is interviewed in the film. “After playing I feel sane and alive,” he said.

“We were able to produce an exhibition that not only deals with sculpture, but also performative cultures and music,” said Sack. “There is often an uncertainty on the part of the public towards the sculpture, so having that musical aspect with the exhibition makes it more accessible to a wider audience.”

The Ke liha pene, I put my pen down The virtual exhibition is on the Iziko site.

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