vice president – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 08:26:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://deepwood.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2-150x150.png vice president – Deepwood http://deepwood.net/ 32 32 Everyday objects created by black inventors https://deepwood.net/everyday-objects-created-by-black-inventors/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 07:13:28 +0000 https://deepwood.net/everyday-objects-created-by-black-inventors/ From three-light traffic lights, refrigerated trucks, automatic elevator doors, desktop color monitors, to the shape of the modern ironing board, clothes wringer, blood banks, laser treatment for cataracts, home security systems and super-soaking children’s toys, many of the items and services that Americans use every day were invented by black men and women. These innovators […]]]>

From three-light traffic lights, refrigerated trucks, automatic elevator doors, desktop color monitors, to the shape of the modern ironing board, clothes wringer, blood banks, laser treatment for cataracts, home security systems and super-soaking children’s toys, many of the items and services that Americans use every day were invented by black men and women.

These innovators were recognized for their inventions, but countless other color inventors go largely unrecognized. Others are completely lost in history.

“There have been cases where black inventors were competing with Alexander Graham Bell, with Thomas Edison, where their inventions were just as good and just as transformative, but they just didn’t have access to capital,” says Shontavia. Johnson, an entrepreneur. and associate vice president for entrepreneurship and innovation at Clemson University in South Carolina. “They didn’t have access to all these different systems that the United States puts in place to support inventors.”

Thomas Edison is credited with inventing the light bulb, but it was Lewis Latimer, the son of former slaves, who patented a new filament that extends the life of light bulbs so they don’t go out after A few days. Latimer was granted a patent for his invention in 1882, which countless black innovators of generations before him were unable to do.

Thomas Jennings received a patent for “dry scrubbing”, a process that led to today’s dry cleaning methods, in 1821. He was the first black man to be granted a patent in the United States.

Free black citizens could obtain patents from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, but enslaved blacks could not. Slavery was not abolished until 1865, with the passage of the 13th Amendment to the US Constitution. Prior to this, the inventions of black innovators were often claimed by their slaveholders or other white people.

Modern research suggests this was the case with the technology behind the cotton gin – a device that separated cotton seeds from their fibers. It was largely innovated by enslaved black people, but a white man named Eli Whitney got the patent for the invention.

“We often think of our country as being that place where innovation and entrepreneurship thrive,” says Johnson. “But when you completely exclude a group of people from access to the patent system, … exploiting their invention, the natural result is that you look at the most important inventors and innovators in American history … and they are just about fter your white inventor stereotype, not because other people weren’t innovative, it’s just that those people were locked out of the patent system.

Lonnie Johnson carries the Super Soaker water gun toy, which he invented.  (Courtesy of Johnson Research & Development Co., Inc.)

Lonnie Johnson carries the Super Soaker water gun toy, which he invented. (Courtesy of Johnson Research & Development Co., Inc.)

This early and deliberate exclusion of black inventors from the patent system and, in large part, from the pantheon of great American inventors, was rooted in racist assumptions about the intellectual inferiority of black people, according to Rayvon Fouché, professor of American studies at the ‘Purdue University. in Lafayette, Indiana.

“Invention was seen as this God-given ability. So, as you can imagine, all perceptions, ideas about masculinity, masculinity, power [and] authority are all wrapped up in this view of inventiveness,” says Fouché, who also directs the National Science Foundation’s Division of Social and Economic Sciences. “The inherent understanding of what an inventor is, was, and could be – the framing of that term – has eliminated the possibility for all black people and all marginalized people.”

Other barriers that black inventors historically faced included less access to equal education, systematic exclusion of science and engineering professionals
corporations, limited access to wealthy investors and mainstream banks for seed capital to commercialize their inventions, and racial violence.

Dr. Patricia Bath, seen here in her Los Angeles home in 1994, invented a new device and technique for cataract surgery.  (NIH photo)

Dr. Patricia Bath, seen here in her Los Angeles home in 1994, invented a new device and technique for cataract surgery. (NIH photo)

Black inventors were also less involved in patenting activity between 1870 and 1940, during the era of lynchings, race riots, and segregation laws in the United States.

There were also the black creators who came up with innovations that did not necessarily correspond to traditional ideas of inventiveness.

“For much of our history, when we think of the word ‘invention,’ it’s sort of loaded with these white, Eurocentric notions of what it means,” says Eric Hintz, a historian at the Lemelson Center for the Study of invention and innovation. at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History. “Often, the traditional definition of ‘invention’ is something like a machine that saves human labor or animal labor, that performs a task more efficiently.”

This prevented some black innovations from being recognized by the patent system.

“[The patent system] is based on this model which essentially assumes that innovation is desirable when it is linked to a commercial advantage. But if it’s rooted in community survival or societal needs, it doesn’t deserve protection, and we see that in the law,” Johnson said. “There are certain types of things that are patentable, and certain things that are not, and that’s a distinction that I think excludes a lot of people from the ecosystem.”

A New York DJ known as Grandmaster Flash pioneered the use of record decks as an instrument by using his fingers to manipulate sounds back and forth or to slow them down. He had an innovative style of mixing records and mixing beats that pioneered the art of deejaying, but he holds no patents.

“Black people have done a lot of creative and innovative things,” says Fouché. “We can think of all kinds of technological creative things in the context of hip-hop and music production and art in other ways. But of course, the patent office is driven by techno-scientific innovation. And I think part of that is, for me, opening up the conversation about what inventiveness is and can be.

The turntable used by DJ Grandmaster Flash is now part of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History collection.

The turntable used by DJ Grandmaster Flash is now part of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History collection.

Museum collections have historically excluded contributions from marginalized people, a failure the Smithsonian’s Lemelson Center readily acknowledges.

“Certainly the Smithsonian and other libraries and museums have been complicit over decades, over centuries, in privileging white inventors in the things we collect,” Hintz says. “We have a ton of stuff on Edison and Tesla. [electricity] and Steve Jobs [innovator of Apple products and devices] and whoever, but it’s now incumbent on us to make sure we preserve the stories of Madame CJ Walker, Grandmaster Flash, Lonnie Johnson – who invented the Super Soaker, Patricia Bath, an ophthalmologist who invented a way to eradicate cataracts. ”

Walker, America’s first self-proclaimed female millionaire, built her fortune with a line of hair care products for black women. Black people also invented the clothes dryer, automatic gear shifting in vehicles, modern toilets, the lawn sprinkler, peanut butter and potato chips.

But the innovation gap persists. African Americans and women still participate in every step of the innovation process at lower rates than their male and white counterparts.

“How do you get more black kids, girls [and] marginalized people in these traditionally white, middle-class, male pathways? says Fouché, emphasizing the importance of stimulating children’s imaginations, despite all the obstacles.

“I’m more interested in saying, ‘Well, what do you want to do? How do you want to change the world? What are the things that make sense to you?’ and just impressing people on the opportunities unlimited…. So don’t limit the possibilities.

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Historic Pasadena Building: From Hay to Heyday and Back https://deepwood.net/historic-pasadena-building-from-hay-to-heyday-and-back/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 00:42:56 +0000 https://deepwood.net/historic-pasadena-building-from-hay-to-heyday-and-back/ HISTORICAL AND VACANT 110 East Holly Street, “J. Cazaurang” inscription reveals the name of the first owner (Photo – Marina Khrustaleva) Across from Memorial Park is a building that holds more memories than you can imagine. By Marina Khrustaleva He was 120 when I write this piece. On February 6, 1902, the builder and contractor […]]]>

HISTORICAL AND VACANT

110 East Holly Street, “J. Cazaurang” inscription reveals the name of the first owner (Photo – Marina Khrustaleva)

Across from Memorial Park is a building that holds more memories than you can imagine.

By Marina Khrustaleva

He was 120 when I write this piece. On February 6, 1902, the builder and contractor The magazine reported that J. Salter had a two-story brick hay and grain warehouse under construction in Pasadena. The warehouse was commissioned by John Cazaurang and measured 100 x 56 feet. It had a cement floor, gravel roof, 18 inch thick walls, and the cost was around $6,000.

Alice Custance-Baker, a local building conservation expert, researched the story of Mr. Cazaurang. He was “a wealthy Frenchman and one of the largest producers of hay and alfalfa in the San Gabriel Valley”. His crops were so bountiful that in 1901 he was arrested for overstoring hay in his old iron barn on Mills Alley. He lost the case four years later. It seems that this issue dampened his feelings for Pasadena; in 1906, he moved to Rancho Guejito in San Diego County and led an adventurous life there.

Its contribution to the Old Town is shown on the 1903 Sanborn map as a “bale hay warehouse” with a granary. However, it soon changed ownership and a recessed “J. Cazaurang” inscription on the front facade was plastered over to remain hidden for many decades. The structure at 110 East Holly St. was purchased by John Breiner, the founder of the Pasadena Meat Market, to serve as stables.The Breiners, father and son, were respected citizens and members of many fraternities.The family lived in the first house designed by Greene and Greene, at 826 E. Colorado Blvd.

inscription on a brick building

110 East Holly Street, “J. Cazaurang” inscription reveals the name of the first owner (Photo – Marina Khrustaleva)

Pasadena Meat Market

The Pasadena Meat Market was one of the first establishments to come to town in 1887. At the turn of the century, it occupied the southwest corner of Colorado and Broadway (now Arroyo Parkway), at only two blocks from the stables. In 1926, the market moved to a brand new building at 682-684 East Colorado Blvd. – “one of the finest and most complete stores of its kind in the west” equipped with ultra-latest appliances – a thirty-foot-long cork-insulated cooler, sanitary display cases, an electric saw, a electric slicer, an electric grinder and a fountain umbrella with goldfish and turtles in the display case. As teenagers, the Breiners used 22 horses for the “carriage trade”; later they switched to picking up and delivering motorists. In 1930, John L. Breiner, Jr. sold the family business and moved to Hermosa Beach.

110 East Holly Street, south elevation (rear) with large arched entrance and paved patio (Photo – Marina Khrustaleva)

Many different uses

Over the years, the building has served many different uses: a 13-car garage, the Red Cross thrift store, the Rose Parade tank shop, the Pasadena Spring and Bumper Company, and the painting contractor’s workshop. In 1979, when successful local architect Stephen B. Barasch nominated the Holly Street Livery Stables for the National Register of Historic Places, it served as a storage facility.

The heyday of this monument occurred much later than its hay days. In 1980, a former vice president of Security Pacific Bank, Dick Krell, turned it into Josephina’s restaurant. Improvements to the building, furniture and equipment totaled nearly a million dollars, resulting in a “lavish setting and informal atmosphere”. Newspapers reported “turn-of-the-century elegance”: charming old English entryway, solid oak paneling, stained glass windows, brass ceiling fans, Tiffany lamps, antique tables and an early 1900s back bar. -even was the cage of an antique dealer from a bank in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. Santa Fe railroad tracks ran along the tilted wall at the time, so trains passed people dining in cozy alcoves with a romantic roar. The menu was mostly Italian with a Chicago flavor.

This splendor did not last long. The warehouse has been transformed into offices. During the last renovation it was gutted and left half finished. It is rented again: the new tenant will have the option of completing this effort or starting over with their own design. The original barn doors, wooden window frames and iron grills will remain no matter what.

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GOP-controlled House passes bill to repeal landmark collective bargaining law for public service workers https://deepwood.net/gop-controlled-house-passes-bill-to-repeal-landmark-collective-bargaining-law-for-public-service-workers/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 20:16:24 +0000 https://deepwood.net/gop-controlled-house-passes-bill-to-repeal-landmark-collective-bargaining-law-for-public-service-workers/ RICHMOND, Va. – “Stronger communities. A Better Bargain” — a coalition of unions collectively representing thousands of working families across Virginia — today condemned Republicans for pass an invoice of the House of Delegates that would repeal a 2020 law that allowed a number of public service workers to gain the freedom to collectively bargain […]]]>
RICHMOND, Va. – “Stronger communities. A Better Bargain” — a coalition of unions collectively representing thousands of working families across Virginia — today condemned Republicans for pass an invoice of the House of Delegates that would repeal a 2020 law that allowed a number of public service workers to gain the freedom to collectively bargain a contract through their unions.

Since it came into effect last year, Delegate Guzman HB 582 and Senator Dick Saslaw SB 939 triggered a series of collective bargaining orders. Fairfax County, Loudoun County, Arlington County, the City of Alexandriaand the Richmond School Board have all taken action to commit to giving their workers a voice at work. Prince William County has taken a step in this direction, while the workers of Virginia BeachPortsmouth, richmond and Norfolk and the teachers of Albemarle County and Prince William County are engaged in various stages of the process of securing collective bargaining rights. the The daily press reports that Newport News public service workers demand collective bargaining rights from their city council.

“Richmond City employees work hard and keep our city running,” said Sonia Easter of SEIU Virginia 512, a Richmond City employee of 25 years. “I work directly with the public, supporting young people and their families. My role is one of the few that is on the proactive side of crime. I help solve problems upstream, especially misdemeanors and misdemeanors, so that young people can avoid the prison system. It’s essential work that experts say directly cuts the school-to-jail pipeline in our city. Collective bargaining is a mechanism that would allow the 3,000 City of Richmond employees to have a seat at the table and a voice in decisions that affect our jobs and livelihoods. He ensures that all employees are heard; that the employees of the small services like me, are not forgotten. Collective bargaining is the tool that creates true partnership and accountability between managers and employees, so that all of the unique needs necessary for proper functioning are recognized and taken into account. This is our opportunity to create real change here and throughout Virginia. We cannot go back.

As we continue to try to teach through political and public health pressures, we are left in the hands of many people who do not always see or recognize what is happening in the alternative setting in which I teach. said Paul Weiner, teacher at Norfolk Public Schools. “Collective bargaining will ensure that all teachers have their voices heard and help us get what we need to serve our students safely and effectively. »

“As an employee of the City of Alexandria, my job is not just a job, it’s a calling,” said Harlie White, traffic and light technician. “I care deeply about my community. In April last year, my colleagues and I worked with members of Alexandria City Council to enact the first collective bargaining ordinance in the Commonwealth in nearly forty years. The freedom to bargain collectively enables public service workers to fight for better services for the communities we serve. HB 883 would set us back by repealing a 2020 law that empowers localities to give utility workers the freedom to join a union, and local municipalities the autonomy to enact union agreements as they see fit. I oppose HB 883 along with other AFSCME members from the city of Alexandria.

“Through collective bargaining, we bargain for more than economic security. It is about securing vital resources to help our communities mobilize more public resources to improve education. Collective bargaining is good public policy,” said Charlotte Hayer, a Richmond high school teacher and VEA member.

“Collective bargaining is about working conditions, safety, benefits, training, equipment and more,” said Henrico County Active Firefighter Bill Boger, President of the Henrico Professional Fire Fighters Association and District Vice President of the Virginia Professional Fire. Fighters representing over 9,000 firefighters who protect the Commonwealth. “As frontline workers dealing with the Covid-19 pandemic on a daily basis, we are able to provide useful information on what we need to keep our communities safe. And as firefighters and EMS providers, we know firsthand what it takes to provide the best possible service. Collective bargaining is a way for workers to have a voice in their jobs. Through collaboration, employers and the communities they serve will see the benefit of having important shared decisions. Collective bargaining strengthens communities, where employees are seen not just as part of a budget, but as assets to the communities in which they live, work and raise their families. »

The legislation is carried by delegate Kathy Byron on behalf of the Administration Youngkin. The House of Delegates also advanced other legislation aimed at curtailing the freedom of public service workers to form a union and collectively bargain a contract, including HB 336, HB 337, and HB 341, all sponsored by Delegate Freitas, as well as the Le HB 790 delegate from LaRock.

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Trump’s lies have taken over the GOP. Now what? https://deepwood.net/trumps-lies-have-taken-over-the-gop-now-what/ Sun, 06 Feb 2022 22:40:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/trumps-lies-have-taken-over-the-gop-now-what/ On Friday, the Republican National Committee officially declared the January 6, 2021 attack on the U.S. Capitol, which left at least five people dead and around 140 injured, to be “legitimate political speech.” In a two-page no-confidence resolution condemning Republican Representatives Liz Cheney and Adam Kinzinger for their participation in the House select committee investigating […]]]>

On Friday, the Republican National Committee officially declared the January 6, 2021 attack on the U.S. Capitol, which left at least five people dead and around 140 injured, to be “legitimate political speech.”

In a two-page no-confidence resolution condemning Republican Representatives Liz Cheney and Adam Kinzinger for their participation in the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack, the RNC wrote that “Representatives Cheney and Kinzinger participate to a Democratic-led persecution of ordinary citizens. engaged in legitimate political discourse, and they both use their past professed political affiliation to mask Democrats’ abuse of prosecutorial power for partisan gain.

In a later tweet, RNC President Ronna McDaniel extended on the language of censorship to clarify that it was referring to “everyday citizens who engaged in legitimate political speech that had nothing to do with the violence on Capitol Hill.”

The original text of the resolution, however — which, the New York Times notes, was “carefully negotiated privately among party members” prior to its release — is an appropriate cap on a week that has seen the GOP, led by the former President Donald Trump, drawing closer than ever to explicitly supporting the attack on the Capitol and his goal of nullifying the 2020 election.

In addition to censorship, Trump told supporters at a rally in Conroe, Texas last Saturday that he would consider pardoning those charged in connection with the Jan. 6 attack, and Politico reported Wednesday. that he was also planning to do so before leaving office in January. Last year.

“If I run and if I win [in 2024], we will treat these people fairly from January 6th. We will treat them fairly,” Trump said at the rally, without addressing any specific concerns about the treatment of rioters. “And if graces are needed, we will grant them graces. Because they are treated so unfairly.

Trump also said in a statement last week that former Vice President Mike Pence “could have canceled the election!” — a claim that, while incorrect, is among Trump’s most overt remarks about the intent behind Jan. 6 and his actions leading up to it.

Trump has yet to announce a formal 2024 presidential bid, but signs point to a likely White House bid as he retains a grip on the GOP ranks.

Meanwhile, large swaths of the Republican Party, still seemingly in Trump’s grip, changed their stance on the Capitol insurrection, distancing themselves from the disturbing reality of these events and positioning the insurgents as innocent protesters, even patriotic guardians of the Constitution.

This reversal — from the horror of the lie-fueled spectacle that unfolded on Capitol Hill last January to the condemnation of Republicans who defy Trump’s narrative — has coalesced perhaps even more clearly in the last week and a half, but it’s been building almost since the attack, led by members of Congress like Reps. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) and Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA).

While some establishment Republicans, including Senator Mitt Romney, have spoken out against censorship and praised the moral compasses of Cheney and Kinzinger, while others have expressed dismay that a future President Trump pardons Jan. 6 rioters, many wholeheartedly bought Trump’s policies. account that they attacked Pence for specifically challenging Trump’s claim on Thursday that he could have overturned the election results.

What Trump Means When He Says He Wants Jan. 6 Prisoners To Be Treated ‘Fairly’

Trump’s claim that he wants fair treatment for the Jan. 6 defendants may be superficially benign, but in reality, it’s just one front in the GOP’s attempt to mythologize the attack as less serious than she wasn’t.

Trump, along with members of Congress like Gaetz and Greene and would-be members like Ohio Senate candidate JD Vance, have made misleading claims about just over 700 people arrested for their role in the attack, including describing them as “political prisoners”. and claiming that they weren’t charged with crimes (they were).

The subtext of Trump’s fairness argument is particularly alarming, given the shocking violence directed at police defending the Capitol on Jan. 6. Trump is right and will be rewarded for his loyalty, while those who oppose his claims to power are not only wrong, but unprincipled.

“There is no place for dissenters from Donald Trump’s views in the Republican Party,” Alex Keyssar, professor of history and social policy at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, told Vox in an interview. Sunday.

Gaetz and Greene — both ardent Trump supporters — are the main proponents of the narrative that Jan. 6 attendees are being mistreated (they aren’t). Last summer, along with Reps. Louie Gohmert (R-TX) and Paul Gosar (R-AZ), they visited a DC jail where Jan. 6 defendants were being held, demanding access as members of Congress and falsely claiming that they had overseen the budget. for prison, according to the Washington Post.

The group, joined by Reps. Andy Biggs (R-AZ) and Bob Good (R-VA), also stormed the Justice Department last summer, with Gosar calling the Jan. 6 defendants “political prisoners” and attempting to ask if any of the defendants were being held in solitary confinement, Meagan Flynn of The Washington Post reported at the time.

The Jan. 6 defendants face a variety of charges, ranging from obstruction of official government process to seditious conspiracy. Some have already been convicted and sentenced; on the first anniversary of the attack, the longest sentence was just over five years in prison.

As Keyssar told Politico in a December 2021 retrospective, the Jan. 6 insurrection accelerated “the downward spiral of American political life” and sparked an “intensified and spiteful struggle for the preservation of values ​​and institutions.” democratic”.

Trump’s insistence on continuing his self-serving narrative of victimhood — and dragging the Republican Party along with it — doesn’t just affect the GOP, as Keyssar points out; it ultimately affects the functioning of democracy and people’s ability to participate in it. “It’s not just about telling different stories,” Keyssar told Vox on Sunday.

Specifically, he said, Trump’s rhetoric around the insurgency is “narrative to justify a particular social order.” According to Keyssar, the narratives that form around the insurrection echo the end of the period of reconstruction in the South after the Civil War. The Reconstruction era gave black Americans unprecedented rights, power, and political representation for a brief period, until the end of the 19th century; in the decades following Reconstruction, the dominant narrative among white Southerners was that the Civil War was an attack on Southern ways of life, and that the Reconstruction period was the result of “carpet-baggers” and ” corrupt northern scalawags taking over the remnants of this society.

At the time, Keyssar said, the Southern white narrative argued that the disenfranchisement of black Southerners and the strengthening of white supremacy “must be restored in order to have a ‘good society’ again.” In the same vein now, Trump’s fiction – that he was the real winner of the 2020 election and widespread fraud deprived him of a second term; that members of his own party who do not support his lies are unpatriotic; and that the people who protested and stormed the Capitol on Jan. 6 are not criminals — aims to restore him to power.

Just because Trump’s talking points around the 2020 election and their endorsement by the Republican Party aren’t exactly unprecedented doesn’t mean they aren’t dangerous, Keyssar said.

The polarization of the two parties and their dominance in state legislatures has encouraged some places to propose laws targeting voter fraud – although there was no evidence of fraud in the 2020 elections – which may have real effect of making it harder. for disenfranchised communities, including black people and people experiencing poverty, to vote.

Furthermore, Keyssar said, the ongoing effort to delegitimize the election serves to deny peaceful means to change power, which could portend further violence in one form or another. “If you discredit the mechanism of elections,” he said, “then what are you left with? To obligate.”

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A proclamation on National Black History Month, 2022 https://deepwood.net/a-proclamation-on-national-black-history-month-2022/ Mon, 31 Jan 2022 16:39:58 +0000 https://deepwood.net/a-proclamation-on-national-black-history-month-2022/ Each February, National Black History Month serves as both a celebration and a powerful reminder that black history is American history, black culture is American culture, and black stories are essential to America’s continuing story – our faults, our struggles, our progress, and our aspirations. Shedding light on black history today is as important as […]]]>

Each February, National Black History Month serves as both a celebration and a powerful reminder that black history is American history, black culture is American culture, and black stories are essential to America’s continuing story – our faults, our struggles, our progress, and our aspirations. Shedding light on black history today is as important as ever to understanding ourselves and growing stronger as a nation. That’s why it’s essential that we take the time to celebrate the immeasurable contributions of Black Americans, to honor the legacy and accomplishments of past generations, to acknowledge centuries of injustice, and to confront those injustices that have unfolded. still festering today.

Our Nation was founded on an idea: that we are all created equal and deserve to be treated with equal dignity throughout our lives. It is a promise that we have never fully kept, but from which we have never strayed. The long shadows of slavery, Jim Crow and redlining – and the scourge of systemic racism that still diminishes our nation today – are holding America back from reaching its full promise and potential. But by facing these tragedies openly and honestly and working together as one people to fulfill the American promise of fairness and dignity for all, we become a stronger nation – a more perfect version of ourselves.

Over the generations, countless Black Americans have shown deep moral courage and resilience to help shape our nation for the better. Today, Black Americans lead industries and movements for change, serve our communities and our nation at all levels, and advance all fields, including the arts and sciences, business and law, health and education, and many more. Facing wounds and obstacles older than our nation itself, Black Americans can be seen in every part of our society today, strengthening and uplifting all of America.

Vice President Harris and I are deeply committed to advancing equity, racial justice, and opportunity for Black Americans as we continue to strive to fulfill America’s founding promise. It began with building a federal government that resembles America: including the first black Secretary of Defense, the first black woman to lead the Office of Management and Budget, the first black man to lead the ‘Environmental Protection Agency, the first black woman to head the Department of Housing and Urban Development in over 40 years, the first black chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, a black ambassador representing America at the United Nations and the first black and South Asian vice president in our history. We are proud to appoint accomplished Black Americans to fill a wide range of roles in our administration. I am even more proud to have already appointed eight black women to serve as federal appeals judges, which in just 1 year corresponds to the total number of black women who have ever served on federal appeals courts.

My administration has worked hard to reverse decades of underinvestment in Black communities, schools, and businesses. America’s bailout and bipartisan infrastructure act make historic investments in black America — from gun shots to checks in families’ pockets and tax cuts for working families with children to an investment historic $5.8 billion and support for historically black colleges and universities. And in my first year in office, the US bailout provided the full child tax credit to low-income families of more than 26 million children — who are disproportionately black — and put us on the path to halving black child poverty.

As the Infrastructure Act continues to be implemented, we will continue this progress. Lead service lines that have contaminated the water in too many homes and schools in black communities will be removed and replaced. We will provide high-speed internet access to every community so that no black family is left behind in the 21st century economy. Historic investments in public transit will help more people in more neighborhoods get quickly and safely to where good jobs are. We will reconnect black neighborhoods cut off from opportunity by highways that were built to keep them away. The long-standing environmental injustices that have hit black communities hardest will be redressed. We will make major investments in Black entrepreneurs and small businesses, including making the Minority Business Development Agency permanent and providing it with a record $110 million in new resources to help level the playing field. game for black businesses.

But this is only the beginning. To fulfill the promise of America for All, we will work tirelessly over the coming year to implement my Build Back Better program, reducing the costs families face in child care, housing, education, health care, prescription drugs and more. We will continue to fight the COVID-19 pandemic by putting equity at the center of our response. We will not rest until we protect the foundation of our democracy: the sacred right to vote. And we will fight to continue to dismantle all those structural inequalities that have served as barriers to black families for generations.
As we celebrate National Black History Month, let us all commit to fulfilling this founding promise. Let us continue to fight for the fairness, opportunity and dignity to which every black American is due in equal measure. Let us continue the work of building an America that is, in the beautiful words of poet Amanda Gorman, “Burned, but whole – benevolent, but bold, fierce and free.

THEREFORE, I, JOSEPH R. BIDEN JR., President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim February 2022 Month Black History National. . I call on public servants, educators, librarians, and all the people of the United States to observe this month with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have affixed my signature this thirty-first of January of the year of grace two thousand and twenty-two and of the independence of the United States of America on the two hundred and forty-six.

JOSEPH R. BIDEN JR.

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Fresh&co opens Connecticut’s first restaurant at Stamford’s Atlantic Station https://deepwood.net/freshco-opens-connecticuts-first-restaurant-at-stamfords-atlantic-station/ Thu, 27 Jan 2022 00:04:15 +0000 https://deepwood.net/freshco-opens-connecticuts-first-restaurant-at-stamfords-atlantic-station/ STAMFORD — Fast-casual restaurant group Fresh&co has announced plans to open its first Connecticut location this year at the downtown Atlantic Station complex. It will occupy 2,860 square feet in the east tower of Atlantic Station at 355 Atlantic St., at the corner of Tresser Boulevard. The restaurant will be the 17th location of the […]]]>

STAMFORD — Fast-casual restaurant group Fresh&co has announced plans to open its first Connecticut location this year at the downtown Atlantic Station complex.

It will occupy 2,860 square feet in the east tower of Atlantic Station at 355 Atlantic St., at the corner of Tresser Boulevard. The restaurant will be the 17th location of the family business Fresh&co, founded in 2010.

“Fresh&co is thrilled to join the Stamford community and bring our neighbors our menu of fresh, healthy and clean fare for breakfast, lunch and dinner,” said George Tenedios, co-founder and CEO of Fresh&co, in a press release. “We’ve been feeding New Yorkers fresh, nutritious food for the past 12 years and we’re excited to continue our expansion outside of the Manhattan market.”


With the exception of one location in Yonkers, NY, and one in Orlando, Florida, all of Fresh&co’s restaurants are in Manhattan, according to its website.

Including Stamford, there are more than 24 Fresh&co franchises in development, according to a company spokesperson. The opening last week of the Orlando restaurant marked the first franchised establishment.

“We are thrilled to welcome Fresh&co to Atlantic Station, as well as Connecticut, and are confident that their presence will be a welcome asset to residents, workforce and visitors,” said Whitney Arcaro, vice-president. Executive Chairman and Head of Marketing and Marketing. retail rentals at RXR, the owner of Atlantic Station, said in a statement.

“This is an important tenant that underscores the continued evolution of downtown Stamford into a day and night community, and we are proud to have worked with the various teams and Fresh&co to bring this to fruition. lease.”

Victor Shaio, owner of Stamford Fresh&co, said in a statement that “the pandemic created unique challenges in negotiating this deal, and we are grateful to the team at RXR for their professionalism and hard work throughout.” .

Fresh&co’s website cites the company’s partnerships with local farmers and a Fresh&co farm in Long Island, NY, “where we grow produce with the goal of providing hyper-local, seasonal fruits and vegetables to all of our restaurants in New York”.

“Our innovative menu is one of a kind, as we take special care of our vegan, vegetarian, gluten-free and meat-loving customers,” the website adds. “All of our entrees, dressings, soups and sauces are prepared daily in-house, ensuring that every meal is prepared just right…Just for you.”

Atlantic Station represents one of the largest mixed-use developments built in Connecticut in recent years. The east tower, which houses 325 apartments, was completed in January 2018. It also contains approximately 34,000 square feet of retail space and approximately 30,000 square feet of office space.

The 325-apartment Atlantic Station West Tower, which also includes approximately 48,000 square feet of retail space, marked its grand opening last July.

A nearby building at 421 Atlantic St, which once housed a post office and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, hosts a Dogtopia Pet Care Center and an early childhood center, The Learning Experience.

pschott@stamfordadvocate.com; twitter: @paulschott

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Historic Lighthouse Receives $ 500,000 Restoration Grant | Greene County https://deepwood.net/historic-lighthouse-receives-500000-restoration-grant-greene-county/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 17:02:00 +0000 https://deepwood.net/historic-lighthouse-receives-500000-restoration-grant-greene-county/ The Hudson-Athens Lighthouse Preservation Society received a $ 500,000 grant from the State Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation Authority to help restore the aging monument. The grant will be used to renovate the roof and gutters of the 147-year-old Hudson-Athens Lighthouse to prevent water intrusion and ongoing erosion. The money will help complete the first […]]]>


The Hudson-Athens Lighthouse Preservation Society received a $ 500,000 grant from the State Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation Authority to help restore the aging monument.

The grant will be used to renovate the roof and gutters of the 147-year-old Hudson-Athens Lighthouse to prevent water intrusion and ongoing erosion. The money will help complete the first of a four-phase restoration project estimated to cost between $ 3-4 million.

Built in 1874, the lighthouse stands on the Hudson River between Hudson and Athens to alert boats of shallow water, in an area of ​​the river known as the Middle Ground Flats. Almost 150 years of currents, dredging and the wake of large ships have deteriorated the historic lighthouse and the nearly 200-year-old underwater wooden pilings that support its structure.

“This grant doesn’t give us our 100-year solution, but it’s a start,” said Society Vice President Bob Green. State park funds cover exterior renovations such as a new staircase from the dock to the lighthouse deck, a new marine toilet, and cistern repairs. However, the Company needs to raise funds to repair the underwater timber pilings, a much more expensive renovation. A 2007-08 state park grant provided the Company with a temporary solution by providing enough money to restore only some pilings.

“The OPRHP grant makes it easier for HALPS to raise funds from federal and state funds. And once that happens, it’s easier to get private donations to complete the project, ”said Green, who lives in Stuyvesant and whose background is in financial consulting. A recently completed engineering assessment concluded that without the necessary repairs, the Hudson-Athens Lighthouse will not survive.

Van Calhoun, chairman of the Hudson-Athens Lighthouse Restoration Committee and self-taught architect, estimates that the entire restoration project will be completed by the end of 2024. “We have to complete the 100-year patch,” a he declared. “If we don’t do anything in 10 to 15 years, people won’t be able to get there safely and the US Coast Guard will put a metal pole with a light in its place.”

Calhoun believes that most of the basic wooden pilings that hold the lighthouse above the water are in good condition because they are covered with river mud which prevents the water from oxidizing the wood.

“It doesn’t sink, it moves,” he said.

Calhoun also predicts that it will take at least nine months for construction to begin on the above water portion of the renovation project. And, by the end of 2024, a steel curtain wall will likely surround the lighthouse slightly above the expected high water level.

The lighthouse will sit atop its mighty stone block structure, but the underwater steel curtain wall will surround the wooden pilings and be strong enough to withstand high tide under a full moon in 50 years, said Calhoun.

Data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration suggests that high tide in 50 years could be 3 to 4 feet higher than current levels. If the Company meets its funding goals for a complete lighthouse restoration, it will be able to tolerate erosion from weather and river currents longer before it needs further renovations.

Today, a green light atop the lighthouse monitored by the US Coast Guard and powered by solar panels flashes every 8 seconds to alert ships passing shallow land. In 1949, lighthouse maintenance slowed down when the need for an on-site lighthouse keeper became redundant due to the installation of automatic lighting.

Then, in 1982, concerned citizens created the Hudson-Athens Lighthouse Preservation Society in an attempt to save the structure. The lighthouse is listed on both the National Register and the New York State Register of Historic Places.

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Worries for China, Russia Reduces Chances of US Nuclear Changes https://deepwood.net/worries-for-china-russia-reduces-chances-of-us-nuclear-changes/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 04:25:56 +0000 https://deepwood.net/worries-for-china-russia-reduces-chances-of-us-nuclear-changes/ WASHINGTON (AP) – Joe Biden’s arrival at the White House almost a year ago seemed to herald a historic shift towards less US reliance on nuclear weapons and perhaps a decrease in their number. Even a US “no use first” pledge – a pledge never to be the first to use a nuclear weapon again […]]]>


WASHINGTON (AP) – Joe Biden’s arrival at the White House almost a year ago seemed to herald a historic shift towards less US reliance on nuclear weapons and perhaps a decrease in their number. Even a US “no use first” pledge – a pledge never to be the first to use a nuclear weapon again – seemed possible.

Then China came – revelations about expanding nuclear force and talk about a potential war with Taiwan.

And then Russia came along – signs that it might be preparing to invade Ukraine.

Now major changes in US nuclear weapons policy seem much less likely, and while Biden may insist on some adjustments, a momentum toward a historic departure from Trump administration policy. seems to have stalled.

The outlook will be clearer when the Biden administration completes its so-called nuclear position review – an internal re-examination of the number, types and purposes of weapons in the nuclear arsenal, as well as the policies that govern their potential use. . The results could be made public as early as January.

The biggest unknown is how strongly Biden will weigh in on these issues, based on the White House’s calculations of political risk. During his years as vice president, Biden spoke about new directions in nuclear policy. But increased concerns about China and Russia appear to enhance the political influence of Republicans seeking to present such a change as a gift to nuclear adversaries.

Russia has become a more urgent center of Biden’s attention after President Vladimir Putin has dispatched around 100,000 troops to positions near the Ukrainian border in recent weeks and demanded US security guarantees. Biden and Putin discussed Ukraine by phone on Thursday, and senior US and Russian officials are expected to continue with more detailed talks in Geneva on January 9-10.

Tom Z. Collina, policy director at the Plowshares Fund, an advocate for nuclear disarmament, says problems in China and Russia complicate Biden’s nuclear review policy but should not prevent him from acting on it. reduce nuclear dangers.

“We don’t want a new nuclear arms race with either nation and the only way to avoid that is through diplomacy,” Collina said. “We must remember the main lesson we learned during the Cold War with Russia: the only way to win an arms race is not to run.”

In March, in what the White House called interim national security guidelines, Biden said China and Russia have changed “the distribution of power across the world.”

“Beijing and Moscow have both invested heavily in efforts to verify US forces and prevent us from defending our interests and allies around the world,” the guide said. Biden pledged to counter with actions aimed at strengthening the United States at home, mending its alliances abroad, and elevating the role of diplomacy. Nuclear weapons were only briefly mentioned.

“We will take steps to reduce the role of nuclear weapons in our national security strategy,” the guide said without providing details, while ensuring a safe and reliable US nuclear force and seeking arms control opportunities.

Since then, concerns about China and Russia have only increased. Private satellite imagery revealed last summer that China was building a large number of new underground silos for nuclear missiles, and in November, a Pentagon report said China could quadruple the size of its nuclear stockpile by 2030.

“Because of what China did, it really changed the color of this review,” said Robert Soofer, who was the Pentagon’s top nuclear policy official under the Trump administration and led a nuclear review in 2018.

“Rather than this being a review that looks at reducing the role of nuclear weapons and even eliminating part of the triad, they have now been forced to stay the course and figure out how to fine-tune it at the margins.”

In June, even before the last build-up of Russian troops near Ukraine, Pentagon policy chief Colin Kahl said the outlook for US nuclear policy was being influenced not only by China’s nuclear ambitions, but also by “Real anxiety” among US allies in Europe over Russian defense and nuclear policy.

“And so, obviously, Russia is the closest wolf to the hanger when it comes to the nuclear issue, but just behind is China’s desire to develop its nuclear arsenal, both quantitatively and qualitatively,” Kahl said on June 23 at a nuclear policy conference sponsored by the Carnegie Foundation for International Peace.

Kahl did not preview the outcome of the policy review, but said it was intended to be part of a broader defense strategy, which is also due to be released in early 2022.

The Pentagon has not publicly discussed the details of the nuclear review, but the administration appears likely to retain the existing contours of nuclear force – the traditional “triad” of sea, air and land weapons, which critics call excessive. It could also encompass a more than $ 1,000 billion modernization of this force, which was initiated by the Obama administration and continued by Trump.

It is not clear whether Biden will approve a significant change in what is called “declaratory policy,” which sets out the purpose of nuclear weapons and the circumstances under which they could be used.

The Obama administration, with Biden as vice president, said in 2010 that it “Only consider the use of nuclear weapons in extreme circumstances to defend the vital interests of the United States or its allies and partners.” He did not define “extreme circumstances”.

Eight years later, the The Trump administration has reaffirmed Obama’s policy but has become more specific. “Extreme circumstances could include significant strategic non-nuclear attacks. Significant strategic non-nuclear attacks include, but are not limited to, attacks on the population or civilian infrastructure of the United States, allies or partners, and attacks on United States or allied nuclear forces, their command and control, or their alert and attack assessment capabilities.

Some thought Biden as president would go in a different direction, following his own advice on a “no-use-first” pledge. He said in a speech in January 2017: “Given our non-nuclear capabilities and the nature of the current threats, it is difficult to envision a plausible scenario in which the first use of nuclear weapons by the United States would be necessary or make sense.”

But some argue that China and Russia this year have changed “today’s threats,” perhaps keeping Biden on a cautious path.


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Tanzania: Zanzibar House Passes Landmark New Drug Law, Paves Way for ‘Victory’ https://deepwood.net/tanzania-zanzibar-house-passes-landmark-new-drug-law-paves-way-for-victory/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 07:43:20 +0000 https://deepwood.net/tanzania-zanzibar-house-passes-landmark-new-drug-law-paves-way-for-victory/ The day before NOL of December 24, 2021 will be remembered as the Zanzibar House of Representatives passed a bill establishing the “Zanzibar Drug Control and Enforcement Authority (ZDCEA)”. Despite heated debate over some sections of the law, the passage of the bill in the House created great excitement among lawmakers and others outside the […]]]>


The day before NOL of December 24, 2021 will be remembered as the Zanzibar House of Representatives passed a bill establishing the “Zanzibar Drug Control and Enforcement Authority (ZDCEA)”.

Despite heated debate over some sections of the law, the passage of the bill in the House created great excitement among lawmakers and others outside the home who have followed the drug problems in the islands, also used as traffic zones. . The law awaiting affirmation by the president of the islands aims to “strengthen the capacity of the authority” to deal with the problems of illicit drugs and narcotics in the tourist islands of Zanzibar.

Many lawmakers commend the government for this significant improvement in the law in the history of drug campaigns in the country. The new law also gives birth to the new ZDCEA which includes the President of Zanzibar as chairman of the National Drug Control and Enforcement Council (NDCEC), leading a team of ministers that is expected to deliver good results.

According to the law, the first vice-president, the second vice-president, the attorney general of Zanzibar; Minister of State in the Office of the First Vice-President; and the Minister of State – Office of the Second Vice President are members of the Council. The other members of the board are the minister responsible for drug control; Minister responsible for legal affairs; Minister in charge of regional administration; Minister in charge of health and social protection; Minister in charge of youth; Minister in charge of finance; and the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP).

The importance of the law includes the institution to be established must be able to investigate, arrest, investigate and prosecute in court; there will be effective management of drug control and control, and collect samples themselves and prevent those samples from returning to the community after the primary case is completed.

Other benefits are a significant reduction in drug trafficking, which will lead to a reduction in the side effects of the drug; strengthening the workforce, especially the youth, and ultimately boosting the country’s economy; and monitoring the use of prescription drugs that can be used as drugs.

The functions of authority, among others, are to educate the public about the effects of drugs; facilitate civic institutions, including external institutions that provide education on the effects of drugs; and develop various guidelines on drugs and their effects on society, including the establishment of sober homes and education on the effects of drugs.

Before the House approved the law, the Minister of State in the Office of the First Vice President, Dr Saada Mkuya Salum, mentioned other functions such as encouraging communities to participate in the control of drug consumption and trafficking. drug; and to encourage and ensure cooperation with the international community in drug control matters. She said the sentences range from one year, seven years, thirty years to life imprisonment and fines between $ 2 million and $ 10 million, depending on the extent of the offense, which include culture, property, distribution, trafficking and processing or manufacturing.

“Smoke… or if found in a house, room or place illegally used for smoking, injecting, inhaling, snorting drugs; or without lawful and reasonable excuse, commits an offense and, on conviction, is liable to a fine of not less than 5m / – or imprisonment for one year or both, ”states the law . Despite the heated debate, House members finally approved the law, with most of them saying that illicit drugs are still a big problem in Zanzibar and that the laws have a weakness in making it possible to successfully eliminate drugs in Zanzibar. Zanzibar.

One of the stated goals of Zanzibar’s new drug law is to treat drug addicts in sober homes, but several backbench MPs, including Prof. Omar Hamad Fakih (Pandani), have explained why “treat those involved in the illegal practice of using drugs? ‘

“Not all young people use drugs at will, because some do and we cannot leave them without help, because they can always return to normal life and contribute to the building of the nation”, said Dr Salum, adding that the new law gives hope to authority as it strengthens its “teeth” and to people who have been neglected by society, and have been continually punished and demonized instead of much needed support.

The Minister insisted that drug use, as well as the supply, production and trafficking, remains an offense under the new law, as before, including the widely used Bangi (Cannabis), where the difference lies in better laws for the authorities to enforce and improve. fines and imprisonment. The Minister informed the House that Zanzibar is not alone in this process, as many countries have made improvements to their laws,

“But in Zanzibar we have gone further with great hope of success in winning the war on drugs.” “Drugs cost lives, ruin families and the economy,” Zubeir Ali Maulid, Speaker of the Zanzibar House of Representatives, said after the bill is passed, urging Zanzibaris to be enthusiastic and optimistic about this new drug law.

“By law, our president is one of the leaders of the campaign against narcotics. We look forward to the implementation immediately after the president’s approval,” the speaker said, adding that this demonstrated political will.

However, Ms. Panya Ali Abdalla (CCM Special Seats) protested against the clause that makes the President of Zanzibar the Chairman of the Zanzibar National Drug Control and Enforcement Council, arguing that the presidency is the most senior position that should not be in no way be “attached to other functions such as being the chairman of the anti-drug task.”

Dr Saada Mkuya Salum was joined by the defendants, the Minister of Trade and Industrial Development, Mr. Omar Said Shaaban, and the Attorney General, Dr Mwinyi Talib Haji, in defending the role of the President of Zanzibar on the council. anti-drug. “The war on drugs is a war on people, creating obstacles to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals, violating human rights, undermining public health, so we must rejoice that the president leads us in this. combat, and his role as president will not be affected, ”they said.

Zanzibar is already building a modern drug addiction center, and the new law is also intended to help and support young people who quit drugs. A total of 3,161 young people who successfully stayed in sober homes gave up drug use. More than 9,000 young people joined the sober houses between 2009, when the sober houses were created in 2019.

During the period, sober homes lost contact with 271 young people, and 813 young people who had recovered from drug use turned to substitute drugs, while 4,786 young people started using drugs again. (relapsed case). Sober Homes (Sober Homes – SLH), also known as Sober Homes and Sober Living Environments, are facilities that provide safe housing and structured, supportive living conditions for people leaving drug addiction programs. .

President Hussein Ali Mwinyi has repeatedly called on the respective authorities to work tirelessly to ensure that the import, supply and use of illicit drugs is controlled and that almost everyone should be engaged in war. Current drug control measures include increased public awareness, revised laws and commitment that have enabled prompt processing / hearing of reported drug-related cases in a short period of time.

Increased collaboration with the police, the Zanzibar Anticorruption and Economic Crime Authority (ZAECA), better data collection on drug abuse cases and the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) help control “import, the distribution and use of illicit drugs. It is estimated that there are around 200 million drug addicts in the world, while Zanzibar has around 12,000.

The effects of drugs include poverty, domestic conflict, armed robbery, death, accidents, STIs, mental health problems, unwanted pregnancies, and hepatitis B and C, among other health problems. The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) encourages individuals, non-profit organizations, the private sector and member states to get involved in its anti-drugs social media campaign.

Cannabis (bangi) is the most widely consumed substance. Around 275 million people used drugs globally in the past year, while more than 36 million people suffered from drug use disorders, according to the World Drug Report 2021 released by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC).

“The theme for this year’s International Day Against Drug Abuse and Trafficking is’ Share facts about drugs. Saving Lives “, stressing the importance of strengthening the evidence base and raising public awareness, so that the international community, governments, civil society, families and young people can make informed decisions and better target efforts to prevent and treat drug use; and tackle the world’s drug challenges. “


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Historical Investigations at Retta Brown, Country Club Colony neighborhoods in progress https://deepwood.net/historical-investigations-at-retta-brown-country-club-colony-neighborhoods-in-progress/ Fri, 10 Dec 2021 06:04:28 +0000 https://deepwood.net/historical-investigations-at-retta-brown-country-club-colony-neighborhoods-in-progress/ The contract has been signed for the next round of Eligibility Determination (DOE) / Cultural Resource surveys and inventories for city neighborhoods. The work will focus on the neighborhoods of Retta Brown and Country Club Colony (CCC) to determine if the areas are eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). Members […]]]>


The contract has been signed for the next round of Eligibility Determination (DOE) / Cultural Resource surveys and inventories for city neighborhoods.

The work will focus on the neighborhoods of Retta Brown and Country Club Colony (CCC) to determine if the areas are eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP).

Members of the El Dorado Historic District Commission said an agreement for professional services was signed on October 29 by Mayor Veronica Smith-Creer and Cox | McClain Environmental Consulting, Inc., based in Austin, in Texas, which conducts surveys and inventories for the two neighborhoods.

The project is the latest step taken by the EHDC to implement a city-wide historic preservation plan.

Among its recommendations, the plan – which was drafted in 2020, according to a project led by the EHDC – lists Retta Brown and Country Club Colony as priority projects.

At a regular EHDC meeting on Thursday, Elizabeth Eggleston, executive director of the EHDC, said that Terracon Consultant Services, Inc., was completing work on a DOE survey and inventory for Mellor subdivision properties, Bodenhamer, Forest Lawn and Eastridge – another project priority that is cited in the city’s historic preservation plan.

With 326 properties included in the survey area, Elizabeth Eggleston, executive director of the EHDC, said Mellor, et. al, the survey is the largest such project the commission has undertaken.

Terracon is headquartered in Kansas and a team from the company’s Austin, TX office began fieldwork in El Dorado in March.

November 1 was the start date for Cox | McClain to begin his survey and inventory for Retta Brown and Country Club Colony.

The company is expected to submit the first 10 Arkansas Architectural Resource forms for each survey by February 15.

Eggleston said she will contact Cox | McClain for an update on the work the company has done so far.

All surveys are funded by Certified Local Government Grants (CLGs) which are channeled through the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program (AHPP).

GLCs are part of a collaboration between the National Park Service (NPS), AHPP, and local city and county governments to conserve historic resources at the local level.

El Dorado is one of Arkansas’ 21 CLGs and in 2019 and 2020 the city received the two largest CLG grants, $ 42,000 and $ 49,049, respectively, which were awarded by the state.

The bulk of the 2019 grant funded the work required to write the comprehensive historic preservation plan for El Dorado.

The $ 42,000 grant was matched with a $ 10,000 match of the one cent tax, El Dorado Works, which is dedicated to economic development, municipal infrastructure and quality of life projects.

The twinning was not required under the terms of the grant agreement, but Historic District Commissioners said at the time that the $ 10,000 demonstrated the city’s support for the effort and was the balance needed to develop the preservation plan at a cost of $ 46,574.

The grant also covered other elements of EHDC’s operations, including the salary of the executive director, training of commissioners, and membership fees of historic preservation organizations.

In 2020, the city received a larger CLG grant – $ 49,049 – which was used extensively to fund Mellor’s survey and inventory, and. al, subdivisions.

For the 2021-2022 CLG grant cycle, the city initially received a grant of $ 22,648 for the DOE’s investigation of the Retta Brown and Country Club Colony neighborhoods.

In September, Eggleston explained that the DOE’s investigation for Country Club Colony – which is bordered by North West Avenue, 19th Street, Calion Road, and El Dorado Golf and Country Club – was going to cost more than expected.

Therefore, the state directed the grant towards the CCC investigation and asked the EHDC to submit Retta Brown’s proposal in an application for the next round of the CLG grant.

A month later, Eggleston told commissioners the state had again changed the terms of the CLG grant, this time to include more money for the Retta Brown project.

A total of 110 properties, including the former Retta Brown Elementary School, will be included in the DOE’s survey for the Retta Brown and Country Club neighborhoods.

Once the investigations are completed, the information will be presented to the EHDC and AHPP for approval.

The documents will then be forwarded to the State Review Board (SRB) for an assessment and if the SRB accepts it, a nomination to the NRHP will be submitted to the National Park Service for a final vote.

For the CLG 2022 – 2023 grant application, EHDC members agreed to include an African-American context as the next recommended project in the city’s historic preservation plan.

The African American context will identify black notables, businesses, churches, neighborhoods, monuments, etc., in El Dorado.

In other business on Thursday, the EHDC voted to re-appoint commissioners Ken Bridges and Steve Biernacki for another term each on the commission.

Their current terms expire this month.

The commissioners also elected officers for 2022, keeping Bridges as president and voting for commissioner Sara Coffman as vice-president.

The deadline is December 24th to submit a request for a certificate of suitability for the next regular meeting of the EHDC on January 13th.

Certificates of Authenticity are required for most exterior projects offered in the city’s historic commercial district, which largely encompasses downtown El Dorado, and will affect the historical and architectural integrity of the neighborhood.


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